waive


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waive

 (wāv)
tr.v. waived, waiv·ing, waives
1. To give up (a claim or right, for example) voluntarily; relinquish. See Synonyms at relinquish.
2. To refrain from insisting on or enforcing (a rule, penalty, or requirement, for example); dispense with: "The original ban on private trading had long since been waived" (William L. Schurz).
3. To refrain from engaging in, sometimes temporarily; cancel or postpone: Let's waive our discussion of that problem.
4. Sports To place (a player) on waivers.

[Middle English weiven, to abandon, from Anglo-Norman weyver, from waif, ownerless property; see waif1.]

waive

(weɪv)
vb (tr)
1. to set aside or relinquish: to waive one's right to something.
2. (Law) to refrain from enforcing (a claim) or applying (a law, penalty, etc)
3. to defer
[C13: from Old Northern French weyver, from waif abandoned; see waif]

waive

(weɪv)

v.t. waived, waiv•ing.
1. to refrain from claiming or insisting on; forgo: to waive one's rank.
2. to relinquish (a right) intentionally: to waive an option.
3. to put aside, esp. for the time; defer or dispense with: to waive formalities.
4. to dismiss from consideration or discussion.
[1250–1300; Middle English weyven < Anglo-French weyver to make a waif (of someone) by forsaking or outlawing (him or her)]

waive


Past participle: waived
Gerund: waiving

Imperative
waive
waive
Present
I waive
you waive
he/she/it waives
we waive
you waive
they waive
Preterite
I waived
you waived
he/she/it waived
we waived
you waived
they waived
Present Continuous
I am waiving
you are waiving
he/she/it is waiving
we are waiving
you are waiving
they are waiving
Present Perfect
I have waived
you have waived
he/she/it has waived
we have waived
you have waived
they have waived
Past Continuous
I was waiving
you were waiving
he/she/it was waiving
we were waiving
you were waiving
they were waiving
Past Perfect
I had waived
you had waived
he/she/it had waived
we had waived
you had waived
they had waived
Future
I will waive
you will waive
he/she/it will waive
we will waive
you will waive
they will waive
Future Perfect
I will have waived
you will have waived
he/she/it will have waived
we will have waived
you will have waived
they will have waived
Future Continuous
I will be waiving
you will be waiving
he/she/it will be waiving
we will be waiving
you will be waiving
they will be waiving
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been waiving
you have been waiving
he/she/it has been waiving
we have been waiving
you have been waiving
they have been waiving
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been waiving
you will have been waiving
he/she/it will have been waiving
we will have been waiving
you will have been waiving
they will have been waiving
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been waiving
you had been waiving
he/she/it had been waiving
we had been waiving
you had been waiving
they had been waiving
Conditional
I would waive
you would waive
he/she/it would waive
we would waive
you would waive
they would waive
Past Conditional
I would have waived
you would have waived
he/she/it would have waived
we would have waived
you would have waived
they would have waived
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.waive - do without or cease to hold or adhere to; "We are dispensing with formalities"; "relinquish the old ideas"
kick, give up - stop consuming; "kick a habit"; "give up alcohol"
2.waive - lose (s.th.) or lose the right to (s.th.) by some error, offense, or crime; "you've forfeited your right to name your successor"; "forfeited property"
abandon - forsake, leave behind; "We abandoned the old car in the empty parking lot"
lapse - let slip; "He lapsed his membership"

waive

verb
1. give up, relinquish, renounce, forsake, drop, abandon, resign, yield, surrender, set aside, dispense with, cede, forgo He pled guilty to the charges and waived his right to appeal.
give up claim, demand, press (for), pursue, insist on, profess
2. disregard, ignore, discount, overlook, set aside, pass over, dispense with, brush aside, turn a blind eye to, forgo The council has agreed to waive certain statutory planning regulations.

waive

verb
1. To give up a possession, claim, or right:
2. To put off until a later time:
Informal: wait.
Idiom: put on ice.
Translations
يَتَنَازَلُ عَنْيَتَنازَل، يَتَخَلّى عَنيُسْقِطُ حَقّا
zříci se
frafaldegive afkald på
verzichten aufabbedingen
olla soveltamatta
odreći se
afsala sér, falla fráfalla frá, vísa frá
放棄する
포기하다
nereikalauti
atceltatsauktatteikties no tiesībām
upustiťvzduť sa
avstå från
สละสิทธิ์
từ bỏ

waive

[weɪv] VT
1. (= not claim) [+ right, claim, fee] → renunciar a
2. (= exonerate from) [+ payment of loan, interest] → exonerar de
3. (= suspend) [+ regulation] → no aplicar; [+ condition, restriction] → no exigir

waive

[ˈweɪv] vt
(= forgo) [+ right] → renoncer à; [+ charge, fee] → faire grâce de
to waive admission charges [gallery, museum] → ouvrir gratuitement ses portes
(= lift) [+ immunity, restrictions, ban] → lever

waive

vt
(= not insist on) rights, claim, feeverzichten auf (+acc); principles, rules, age limit etcaußer Acht lassen
(= put aside, dismiss) question, objectionabtun

waive

[weɪv] vt (claim) → rinunciare a; (rule, age limit) → non tener conto di

waive

(weiv)
1. to give up or not insist upon (eg a claim or right). He waived his claim to all the land north of the river.
2. not to demand or enforce (a fine, penalty etc). The judge waived the sentence and let him go free.

waive

يَتَنَازَلُ عَنْ zříci se give afkald på verzichten auf παραιτούμαι από απαίτηση descartar olla soveltamatta supprimer odreći se rinunciare 放棄する 포기하다 afzien van gi avkall på odstąpić renunciar отказываться avstå från สละสิทธิ์ vazgeçmek từ bỏ 放弃

waive

v. diferir, posponer.
References in classic literature ?
The scout nodded his head in assent, though he seemed anxious to waive the further discussion of a subject that appeared painful.
But while they freely waive a ceremonial like this, they do by no means renounce their claim to more solid tribute.
If my esteemed neighbor, the State's ambassador, who will devote his days to the settlement of the question of human rights in the Council Chamber, instead of being threatened with the prisons of Carolina, were to sit down the prisoner of Massachusetts, that State which is so anxious to foist the sin of slavery upon her sister--though at present she can discover only an act of inhospitality to be the ground of a quarrel with her--the Legislature would not wholly waive the subject of the following winter.
Of course, it would have been best, all round, for Merlin to waive etiquette and quit and call it half a day, since he would never be able to start that water, for he was a true magician of the time; which is to say, the big miracles, the ones that gave him his repu- tation, always had the luck to be performed when nobody but Merlin was present; he couldn't start this well with all this crowd around to see; a crowd was as bad for a magician's miracle in that day as it was for a spiritualist's miracle in mine; there was sure to be some skeptic on hand to turn up the gas at the crucial moment and spoil everything.
Jaggers, which you desired me to waive for a moment.
Nevertheless, if you will promise to be more careful in future, I will waive all past cause of complaint, and at the end of the term I shall be able to judge as to your continuing among us.
Then with that assurance and your highness's good leave," said Don Quixote, "I hereby for this once waive my privilege of gentle blood, and come down and put myself on a level with the lowly birth of the wrong-doer, making myself equal with him and enabling him to enter into combat with me; and so, I challenge and defy him, though absent, on the plea of his malfeasance in breaking faith with this poor damsel, who was a maiden and now by his misdeed is none; and say that he shall fulfill the promise he gave her to become her lawful husband, or else stake his life upon the question.
In matters of contribution, it is the practice to waive the articles of the constitution.
We have purchased permission to waive the usual delay; and at half-past two o'clock the mayor of Marseilles will be waiting for us at the city hall.
Grief is such a leveller, with its own dignity and its own humility, that the noble and the peasant, the beggar and the monarch, will waive their pretensions to external rank without the officiousness of interference on our part.
She had set herself to stand or fall by her qualities, and to waive such merely technical claims upon a strange family as had been established for her by the flimsy fact of a member of that family, in a season of impulse, writing his name in a church-book beside hers.
She believed she must waive the subject altogether.