waiver


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waiv·er

 (wā′vər)
n.
1.
a. Intentional relinquishment of a right, claim, or privilege.
b. The document that evidences such relinquishment.
2. A dispensation, as from a rule or penalty.
3. Permission for a professional athletic club to assign a player to the minor leagues or release a player from the club, granted only after all other clubs have been given the opportunity to claim the player and have not done so.
4. A deferment.
tr.v. wai·vered, wai·ver·ing, wai·vers
To provide with a waiver or issue a waiver for.
Idioms:
clear waivers
To be unclaimed by another professional club and therefore liable to be assigned to a minor-league club or released.
on waivers
In a state of being available for claiming by other professional clubs.

[Anglo-Norman weyver, from weyver, to abandon; see waive.]

waiver

(ˈweɪvə)
n
1. (Law) the voluntary relinquishment, expressly or by implication, of some claim or right
2. (Law) the act or an instance of relinquishing a claim or right
3. (Law) a formal statement in writing of such relinquishment
[C17: from Old Northern French weyver to relinquish, waive]

waiv•er

(ˈweɪ vər)

n.
1. the intentional relinquishment of a right.
2. an express or written statement specifying this.
[1620–30; < Anglo-French weyver, n. use of infinitive: to waive; see -er3]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.waiver - a formal written statement of relinquishment
relinquishing, relinquishment - the act of giving up and abandoning a struggle or task etc.
granting immunity, exemption, immunity - an act exempting someone; "he was granted immunity from prosecution"

waiver

waiver

noun
1. A giving up of a possession, claim, or right:
2. The act of putting off or the condition of being put off:
Translations
zrzeczenie się

waiver

[ˈweɪvəʳ] N
1. (= renouncement) [of right, claim, fee] → renuncia f
2. (= exoneration) (from payment) → exoneración f
3. (= suspension) [of regulation, condition, restriction] → exención f
4. (= disclaimer) [of responsibility] → descargo m

waiver

[ˈweɪvər] ndispense f

waiver

n (Jur) → Verzicht m (→ of auf +acc); (= document)Verzichterklärung f; (of law, contract, clause)Außerkraftsetzung f

waiver

[ˈweɪvəʳ] nrinuncia
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