walk off


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walk

 (wôk)
v. walked, walk·ing, walks
v.intr.
1. To move over a surface by taking steps with the feet at a pace slower than a run: a baby learning to walk; a horse walking around a riding ring.
2.
a. To go or travel on foot: walked to the store.
b. To go on foot for pleasure or exercise; stroll: walked along the beach looking for shells.
c. To move in a manner suggestive of walking: saw a woodpecker walking up the tree trunk.
3. To conduct oneself or behave in a particular manner; live: walks in majesty and pride.
4. To appear as a supernatural being: The specter of famine walks through the land.
5. Informal
a. To go out on strike.
b. To resign from one's job abruptly; quit.
c. To be acquitted: The alleged killer walked.
6.
a. Baseball To go to first base after the pitcher has thrown four pitches ruled as balls.
b. Basketball To move illegally while holding the ball; travel.
7. Obsolete To be in constant motion.
v.tr.
1. To go or pass over, on, or through by walking: walk the financial district of a city.
2. To bring to a specified condition by walking: They walked me to exhaustion.
3. To cause to walk or proceed at a walk: walk a horse uphill.
4. To accompany in walking; escort on foot: walk the children home; walked me down the hall.
5. To traverse on foot in order to survey or measure; pace off: walked the bounds of the property.
6. To move (a heavy or cumbersome object) in a manner suggestive of walking: walked the bureau into the hall.
7. Baseball
a. To allow (a batter) to go to first base by throwing four pitches ruled as balls.
b. To cause (a run) to score by walking a batter. Often used with in.
n.
1.
a. The gait of a human or other biped in which the feet are lifted alternately with one part of a foot always on the ground.
b. The gait of a quadruped in which at least two feet are always touching the ground, especially the gait of a horse in which the feet touch the ground in the four-beat sequence of near hind foot, near forefoot, off hind foot, off forefoot.
c. The self-controlled extravehicular movement in space of an astronaut.
2. The act or an instance of walking, especially a stroll for pleasure or exercise.
3.
a. The rate at which one walks; a walking pace.
b. The characteristic way in which one walks.
4. The distance covered or to be covered in walking.
5. A place, such as a sidewalk or promenade, on which one may walk.
6. A route or circuit particularly suitable for walking: one of the prettiest walks in the area.
7.
a. Baseball A base on balls.
b. Basketball The act or an instance of moving illegally with the ball; traveling.
8. Sports
a. A track event in which contestants compete in walking a specified distance.
b. Racewalking.
9. An enclosed area designated for the exercise or pasture of livestock.
10.
a. An arrangement of trees or shrubs planted in widely spaced rows.
b. The space between such rows.
Phrasal Verbs:
walk out
1. To go on strike.
2. To leave suddenly, often as a signal of disapproval.
walk over Informal
1. To treat badly or contemptuously.
2. To gain an easy or uncontested victory over.
walk through
To perform (a play, for example) in a perfunctory fashion, as at a first rehearsal.
Idioms:
walk away from
1. To outdo, outrun, or defeat with little difficulty: walked away from the competition.
2. To survive (an accident) with very little injury.
3. To refuse to accept (an offer, for example).
4. To decline to continue participation in (a job, relationship, or activity, for example), often abruptly or nonchalantly.
5. To abandon (a property) on which one owes a mortgage, as when the principal of the mortgage exceeds the market value of the house.
walk in the park
Something that is easy to do or accomplish.
walk off/away with
1. To win easily or unexpectedly.
2. To steal.
walk of shame
Slang The walk home from a place where one unexpectedly spent the night engaged in activity, especially casual sex, considered embarrassing or shameful.
walk on air
To feel elated.
walk out on
To desert or abandon.
walk (someone) through
To guide (someone) deliberately through (a process), one step at a time: She walked me through the installation of new software.
walk the plank
To be forced, as by pirates, to walk off a plank extended over the side of a ship so as to drown.
walk the walk
1. To have skill, ability, or experience in a given activity or field.
2. To do what one claims one will do; deliver on one's promises.

[Middle English walken, from Old English wealcan, to roll; see wel- in Indo-European roots.]

walk′a·bil′i·ty n.
walk′a·ble adj.

walk off

vb
1. (intr) to depart suddenly
2. (tr, adverb) to get rid of by walking: to walk off an attack of depression.
3. (Physiology) walk a person off his or her feet to make someone walk so fast or far that he or she is exhausted
4. walk off with
a. to steal
b. to win, esp easily
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.walk off - take without permissionwalk off - take without permission; "he walked off with my wife!"; "The thief walked off with my gold watch"
steal - take without the owner's consent; "Someone stole my wallet on the train"; "This author stole entire paragraphs from my dissertation"
2.walk off - go away fromwalk off - go away from; "The actor walked off before he got his cue"; "I got annoyed and just walked off"
go forth, leave, go away - go away from a place; "At what time does your train leave?"; "She didn't leave until midnight"; "The ship leaves at midnight"
Translations

w>walk off

vt sep poundsablaufen (inf); I’m going out to try and walk off this headache/hangoverich gehe jetzt an die Luft, um meine Kopfschmerzen/meinen Kater loszuwerden; we walked off our lunch with a stroll in the parknach dem Mittagessen haben wir einen Verdauungsspaziergang im Park gemacht
viweggehen; he walked off in the opposite directioner ging in die andere Richtung davon
References in classic literature ?
At the end of half an hour one man stated that his dog could start a sled with five hundred pounds and walk off with it; a second bragged six hundred for his dog; and a third, seven hundred.
And break it out, and walk off with it for a hundred yards," John Thornton said coolly.
He slept in a stable--generally on horseback--and so terrified a Newfoundland dog by his preternatural sagacity, that he has been known, by the mere superiority of his genius, to walk off unmolested with the dog's dinner, from before his face.
No, no; it was no stroke that would let a man stand on his legs, like a horse between the shafts, and then walk off as soon as you can say "Gee
Rose tried to walk off with her usual free tread, but the under-skirt got in her way, the over-skirt was so tight she could not take a long step, and her boots made it impossible to carry herself perfectly erect.
You can run away from the mad dogs, and walk off at a smart pace without tumbling on your nose, now, I fancy?
For example, the calories in a can of fizzy drink take a person of average age and weight about 26 minutes to walk off," Ms Cramer said.
six, from Norris Green, walked away with the PS1,000 cash prize at the final of the Liverpool Walk Off at the Hilton hotel in Liverpool.
JUST turn up and walk off Christmas - that's the message from Knowle & Dorridge Lions who are inviting everyone to pull on their boots for their 22nd anniversary festive walk on Sunday, December 28, from Baddesley Clinton NT House, make a donation to charity and walk off the Christmas pudding.
Just Walk: Walk Off Fat Fast is an exercise DVD accessible to people of all ages and fitness levels.
X FACTOR judge Cheryl Fernandez-Versini has scoffed at ratings rival Strictly by saying her contestants walk off with life-changing opportunities - rather than just a glitterball.
He was attended to by the medical staff but was able to walk off the field under his own power.