wallow

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wal·low

 (wŏl′ō)
intr.v. wal·lowed, wal·low·ing, wal·lows
1. To roll the body about or lie relaxed in water or mud.
2. To indulge oneself to a great degree in something: wallow in self-righteousness.
3. To be plentifully supplied: wallowing in money.
4. To move with difficulty in a clumsy or rolling manner; flounder: "The car wallowed back through the slush, with ribbons of bright water trickling down the windshield from the roof" (Anne Tyler).
n.
1. The act or an instance of wallowing.
2.
a. A pool of water or mud where animals go to wallow.
b. The depression, pool, or pit produced by wallowing animals.

[Middle English walowen, from Old English wealwian; see wel- in Indo-European roots.]

wal′low·er n.

wallow

(ˈwɒləʊ)
vb (intr)
1. (Zoology) (esp of certain animals) to roll about in mud, water, etc, for pleasure
2. to move about with difficulty
3. to indulge oneself in possessions, emotion, etc: to wallow in self-pity.
4. (of smoke, waves, etc) to billow
n
5. the act or an instance of wallowing
6. (Zoology) a muddy place or depression where animals wallow
[Old English wealwian to roll (in mud); related to Latin volvere to turn, Greek oulos curly, Russian valun round pebble]
ˈwallower n

wal•low

(ˈwɒl oʊ)

v.i.
1. to roll about or lie in water, mud, dust, etc., as for refreshment: goats wallowing in the dust.
2. to indulge oneself; luxuriate; revel: to wallow in luxury; to wallow in sentimentality.
3. to flounder about; move or proceed clumsily.
4. to billow forth, as smoke.
n.
5. an act or instance of wallowing.
6. a place in which animals wallow.
[before 900; Middle English walwen, Old English wealwian to roll, c. Gothic af-walwjan to roll away; akin to Latin volvere to roll]
wal′low•er, n.

wallow


Past participle: wallowed
Gerund: wallowing

Imperative
wallow
wallow
Present
I wallow
you wallow
he/she/it wallows
we wallow
you wallow
they wallow
Preterite
I wallowed
you wallowed
he/she/it wallowed
we wallowed
you wallowed
they wallowed
Present Continuous
I am wallowing
you are wallowing
he/she/it is wallowing
we are wallowing
you are wallowing
they are wallowing
Present Perfect
I have wallowed
you have wallowed
he/she/it has wallowed
we have wallowed
you have wallowed
they have wallowed
Past Continuous
I was wallowing
you were wallowing
he/she/it was wallowing
we were wallowing
you were wallowing
they were wallowing
Past Perfect
I had wallowed
you had wallowed
he/she/it had wallowed
we had wallowed
you had wallowed
they had wallowed
Future
I will wallow
you will wallow
he/she/it will wallow
we will wallow
you will wallow
they will wallow
Future Perfect
I will have wallowed
you will have wallowed
he/she/it will have wallowed
we will have wallowed
you will have wallowed
they will have wallowed
Future Continuous
I will be wallowing
you will be wallowing
he/she/it will be wallowing
we will be wallowing
you will be wallowing
they will be wallowing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been wallowing
you have been wallowing
he/she/it has been wallowing
we have been wallowing
you have been wallowing
they have been wallowing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been wallowing
you will have been wallowing
he/she/it will have been wallowing
we will have been wallowing
you will have been wallowing
they will have been wallowing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been wallowing
you had been wallowing
he/she/it had been wallowing
we had been wallowing
you had been wallowing
they had been wallowing
Conditional
I would wallow
you would wallow
he/she/it would wallow
we would wallow
you would wallow
they would wallow
Past Conditional
I would have wallowed
you would have wallowed
he/she/it would have wallowed
we would have wallowed
you would have wallowed
they would have wallowed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wallow - a puddle where animals go to wallowwallow - a puddle where animals go to wallow
mud puddle - a puddle of mud; "the children loved a mud puddle"
2.wallow - an indolent or clumsy rolling aboutwallow - an indolent or clumsy rolling about; "a good wallow in the water"
axial motion, axial rotation, roll - rotary motion of an object around its own axis; "wheels in axial rotation"
Verb1.wallow - devote oneself entirely to somethingwallow - devote oneself entirely to something; indulge in to an immoderate degree, usually with pleasure; "Wallow in luxury"; "wallow in your sorrows"
indulge - give free rein to; "The writer indulged in metaphorical language"
2.wallow - roll around, "pigs were wallowing in the mud"wallow - roll around, "pigs were wallowing in the mud"
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
3.wallow - rise up as if in waveswallow - rise up as if in waves; "smoke billowed up into the sky"
soar, soar up, soar upwards, surge, zoom - rise rapidly; "the dollar soared against the yen"
cloud - billow up in the form of a cloud; "The smoke clouded above the houses"
4.wallow - be ecstatic with joywallow - be ecstatic with joy      
be on cloud nine, exult, jump for joy, walk on air - feel extreme happiness or elation
5.wallow - delight greatly in; "wallow in your success!"
revel, delight, enjoy - take delight in; "he delights in his granddaughter"

wallow

verb
1. revel, indulge, relish, savour, delight, glory, thrive, bask, take pleasure, luxuriate, indulge yourself All he wants to do is wallow in self-pity.
revel avoid, give up, do without, refrain from, abstain, eschew, forgo
2. roll about, lie, tumble, wade, slosh, welter, splash around Hippos love to wallow in mud.

wallow

verb
1. To take extravagant pleasure:
2. To move about in an indolent or clumsy manner:
Translations
تَقَلُّب، تَمَرُّغيَتَقَلَّب مَسْرورا
vælten sig
fetrengéshentereg
velta sér, veltastvelta, veltingur
voliojimasisvoliotis
vārtīšanāsvārtīties
prevaľovanieváľať sa

wallow

[ˈwɒləʊ]
A. N I had a good wallow in the bathdescansé bañándome largamente
B. VI (in water, mud) → revolcarse (in en) [boat] → bambolearse
to wallow in guiltregodearse or deleitarse en el remordimiento
to wallow in luxury/moneynadar en la opulencia/abundancia

wallow

[ˈwɒləʊ] vi
(in mud)se vautrer
to wallow in misery, to wallow in one's grief → se complaire dans son malheur

wallow

n (= act)Bad nt; (= place)Suhle f
vi
(lit) (animal)sich wälzen, sich suhlen; (boat)rollen
(fig) to wallow in luxury/self-pity etcim Luxus/Selbstmitleid etc schwelgen; to wallow in money (inf)im Geld schwimmen (inf)

wallow

[ˈwɒləʊ] vi to wallow (in) (in water, mud) → rotolarsi (in); (in bath) → sguazzare (in)
to wallow in one's grief → crogiolarsi nel proprio dolore
to wallow in luxury → nuotare nell'oro

wallow

(ˈwoləu) verb
to roll about with enjoyment. This hippopotamus wallowed in the mud.
noun
an act of wallowing.
References in classic literature ?
But, on the other hand, they connect diagonally, and the sprawling outlines run off in great slanting waves of optic horror, like a lot of wallowing seaweeds in full chase.
Though not one of the oarsmen was then facing the life and death peril so close to them ahead, yet with their eyes on the intense countenance of the mate in the stern of the boat, they knew that the imminent instant had come; they heard, too, an enormous wallowing sound as of fifty elephants stirring in their litter.
They could tell the whole hateful story of it, set forth the inner soul of a city in which justice and honor, women's bodies and men's souls, were for sale in the marketplace, and human beings writhed and fought and fell upon each other like wolves in a pit; in which lusts were raging fires, and men were fuel, and humanity was festering and stewing and wallowing in its own corruption.
All literature which describes life as it existed in England, France, and Germany up to the close of the last century, is filled with pictures of coaches and carriages wallowing through these three countries in mud and slush half-wheel deep; but after Napoleon had floundered through a conquered kingdom he generally arranged things so that the rest of the world could follow dry-shod.
So, when the holidays ended, we staggered up from the filth of our wallowing, took a long breath, and marched to the field,--feeling, upon the whole, rather glad to go, from what our master had deceived us into a belief was freedom, back to the arms of slavery.
The case is so hopeless, and I feel that I am wallowing in such a bog of nonsense, that I give up all idea of getting out, and abandon myself to my fate.
But I could have easily vindicated humankind from the imputation of singularity upon the last article, if there had been any swine in that country (as unluckily for me there were not), which, although it may be a sweeter quadruped than a YAHOO, cannot, I humbly conceive, in justice, pretend to more cleanliness; and so his honour himself must have owned, if he had seen their filthy way of feeding, and their custom of wallowing and sleeping in the mud.
The buffaloes generally keep to the pools and muddy places, where they lie wallowing or basking in the warm mud for hours.
There were fifty pigs wallowing in each stye, all of them breeding sows; but the boars slept outside and were much fewer in number, for the suitors kept on eating them, and the swineherd had to send them the best he had continually.
His enemies had a ridiculous story that Master Pigsnort was accustomed to spend a whole hour after prayer time, every morning and evening, in wallowing naked among an immense quantity of pine-tree shillings, which were the earliest silver coinage of Massachusetts.
Now it was the shape of a man in a long robe, the fleecy whiteness of which was made out of the fountain's spray; now it was a lion, or a tiger, or a wolf, or an ass, or, as often as anything else, a hog, wallowing in the marble basin as if it were his sty.
And, wallowing as if she meant to turn over with us, the barque, her decks full of water, her gear flying in bights, ran at some ten knots an hour.