wand


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

wand

 (wŏnd)
n.
1. A thin supple rod, twig, or stick.
2. A slender rod carried as a symbol of office in a procession; a scepter.
3. Music A conductor's baton.
4.
a. A stick or baton used by a magician, conjurer, or diviner.
b. A stick or baton associated with the supernatural as a source of power.
5. A pipelike attachment that lengthens the handle of a device or tool: a vacuum cleaner that has two extension wands.
6. A handheld electronic device, often shaped like a rod, that is used for security purposes to detect metal.
7. Sports A narrow slat used as an archery target.
tr.v. wand·ed, wand·ing, wands
To scan (a person, for example) with an electronic wand.

[Middle English, from Old Norse vöndr.]

wand

(wɒnd)
n
1. a slender supple stick or twig
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a thin rod carried as a symbol of authority
3. (Alternative Belief Systems) a rod used by a magician, water diviner, etc
4. (Music, other) informal a conductor's baton
5. (Archery) archery a marker used to show the distance at which the archer stands from the target
6. (Computer Science) a hand-held electronic device, such as a light pen or bar-code reader, which is pointed at or passed over an item to read the data stored there
[C12: from Old Norse vōndr; related to Gothic wandus and English wend]
ˈwandˌlike adj

wand

(wɒnd)

n.
1. a slender stick or rod, esp. one used by a magician or conjurer.
2. a rod or staff carried as an emblem of one's office or authority.
3. a slender shoot, stem, or branch of a shrub or tree.
4. a small applicator for cosmetics, usu. having a brush at the tip.
5. an archer's target consisting of a slat 6 ft. (183 cm) by 2 in. (5 cm) placed at a distance of 100 yd. (91 m) for men and 60 yd. (55 m) for women.
6. an electronic device, in the form of a hand-held rod, that can optically read coded or printed data, as on a merchandise label or in a document.
[1150–1200; Middle English < Old Norse vǫndr, c. Gothic wandus]

wand

Also called a rod or blasting rod, this is a tool used by witches and magicians for conjuring and directing energy.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wand - a rod used by a magician or water divinerwand - a rod used by a magician or water diviner
rod - a long thin implement made of metal or wood
2.wand - a thin supple twig or rod; "stems bearing slender wands of flowers"
branchlet, sprig, twig - a small branch or division of a branch (especially a terminal division); usually applied to branches of the current or preceding year
3.wand - a ceremonial or emblematic staffwand - a ceremonial or emblematic staff  
staff - a rod carried as a symbol
bauble - a mock scepter carried by a court jester
4.wand - a thin tapered rod used by a conductor to lead an orchestra or choirwand - a thin tapered rod used by a conductor to lead an orchestra or choir
rod - a long thin implement made of metal or wood

wand

noun stick, rod, cane, baton, stake, switch, birch, twig, sprig, withe, withy a magician's wand
Translations
عَصا، قَضيب، صَوْلَجان
tryllestav
sauva
varázspálcavonalkódolvasó
sproti
nūjiņa
kúzelná palička

wand

[wɒnd] N (= magic wand) → varita f mágica; [of office] → bastón m de mando
see also wave B1

wand

[ˈwɒnd] n (also magic wand) → baguette f magique

wand

n (= magic wand)Zauberstab m; (of office)Amtsstab m; (Comput, for bar codes) → Lesestift m

wand

[wɒnd] n (also magic wand) → bacchetta magica; (of usher) → mazza

wand

(wond) noun
a long slender rod eg used as the symbol of magic power by conjurors, fairies etc. In the story, the fairy waved her magic wand and the frog became a prince.
References in classic literature ?
The water you seek springs from a well in an enchanted castle; and, that you may be able to reach it in safety, I will give you an iron wand and two little loaves of bread; strike the iron door of the castle three times with the wand, and it will open: two hungry lions will be lying down inside gaping for their prey, but if you throw them the bread they will let you pass; then hasten on to the well, and take some of the Water of Life before the clock strikes twelve; for if you tarry longer the door will shut upon you for ever.
Mercury presented himself, and striking the Philosopher with his wand, said, "And are you indeed to make yourself a judge of the dealings of Providence, who hast thyself in a similar manner treated these poor Ants?
And as those who came up before her throne greeted her, so she pointed now with the wand of ivory in her right hand, and now with the wand of ebony in her left hand.
A personage, who it appeared afterwards was a physician, placed himself standing by his side with a whalebone wand in his hand.
On the second round, the stranger led off and landed cleverly within the small garland at the top of the wand; but Robin shot far better and clave the wand itself, clean at the middle.
Last eve in dreams, I saw thee stand, Like queenly nymphs from Fairy-land-- Enchantress of the flowery wand, Most beauteous Isadore!
When she had got them into her house, she set them upon benches and seats and mixed them a mess with cheese, honey, meal, and Pramnian wine, but she drugged it with wicked poisons to make them forget their homes, and when they had drunk she turned them into pigs by a stroke of her wand, and shut them up in her pig-styes.
Finally I promised one little girl, who made a long journey to see me and prefer her request, -- and she is a "Dorothy," by the way -- that when a thousand little girls had written me a thousand little letters asking for the Scarecrow and the Tin Woodman I would write the book, Either little Dorothy was a fairy in disguise, and waved her magic wand, or the success of the stage production of "The Wizard of OZ" made new friends for the story, For the thousand letters reached their destination long since -- and many more followed them.
Locksley returned almost instantly with a willow wand about six feet in length, perfectly straight, and rather thicker than a man's thumb.
Neither is the ancient rule amiss, to bend nature, as a wand, to a contrary extreme, whereby to set it right, understanding it, where the contrary extreme is no vice.
Every fairy wand glistened in the air, as with silvery voices they cried, "Love and little Violet.
Their faces were painted in stripes of white and yellow; down their backs hung snake-skins, and round their waists rattled circlets of human bones, while each held a small forked wand in her shrivelled hand.