wander


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wan·der

 (wŏn′dər)
v. wan·dered, wan·der·ing, wan·ders
v.intr.
1. To move about without a definite destination or purpose.
2. To go by an indirect route or at no set pace; amble: We wandered toward town.
3. To proceed in an irregular course; meander: The path wanders through the park.
4. To behave in a manner that does not conform to morality or norms: wander from the path of righteousness.
5. To turn the attention from one subject to another with little clarity or coherence of thought: I had a point to make, but my mind started wandering.
6. To be directed without an object or in various directions: His eyes wandered to the balcony.
v.tr.
1. To wander across or through: wander the forests and fields.
2. To be directed around or over: Her gaze wandered the docks.
n.
The act or an instance of wandering.

[Middle English wanderen, from Old English wandrian.]

wan′der·er n.
wan′der·ing·ly adv.
Synonyms: wander, ramble, roam, rove1, range, meander, stray, gallivant, gad1
These verbs mean to move about at random or without destination or purpose. Wander and ramble stress the absence of a fixed course or goal: The professor wandered down the hall lost in thought. "They would go off together, rambling along the river" (John Galsworthy).
Roam and rove emphasize freedom of movement, often over a wide area: "Herds of horses and cattle roamed at will over the plain" (George W. Cable). "For ten long years I roved about, living first in one capital, then another" (Charlotte Brontë).
Range suggests wandering in all directions: "a large hunting party known to be ranging the prairie" (Francis Parkman).
Meander suggests leisurely wandering over an irregular or winding course: "He meandered to and fro ... observing the manners and customs of Hillport society" (Arnold Bennett).
Stray refers to deviation from a proper course or area: "The camels strayed to graze on the branches of distant acacias" (Jeffrey Tayler).
Gallivant refers to wandering in search of pleasure: gallivanted all over the city during our visit. Gad suggests restlessness: gadded about unaccompanied in foreign places.

wander

(ˈwɒndə)
vb (mainly intr)
1. (also tr) to move or travel about, in, or through (a place) without any definite purpose or destination
2. to proceed in an irregular course; meander
3. to go astray, as from a path or course
4. (of the mind, thoughts, etc) to lose concentration or direction
5. to think or speak incoherently or illogically
n
the act or an instance of wandering
[Old English wandrian; related to Old Frisian wandria, Middle Dutch, Middle High German wanderen]
ˈwanderer n
ˈwandering adj, n
ˈwanderingly adv

wan•der

(ˈwɒn dər)

v.i.
1. to ramble without a definite purpose or objective; roam.
2. to go aimlessly or indirectly; meander: The river wanders among the rocks.
3. to extend in an irregular course or direction: Foothills wandered off to the south.
4. to move, pass, or turn idly, as the hand or the eyes.
5. (of the mind, thoughts, desires, etc.) to take one direction or another without conscious control.
6. to stray from a path, place, companions, etc.: The ship wandered from its course.
7. to deviate in conduct, belief, etc.; err; go astray.
v.t.
8. to travel about, on, or through: He wandered the streets.
[before 900; Middle English wandren, Old English wandrian]
wan′der•er, n.

wander


Past participle: wandered
Gerund: wandering

Imperative
wander
wander
Present
I wander
you wander
he/she/it wanders
we wander
you wander
they wander
Preterite
I wandered
you wandered
he/she/it wandered
we wandered
you wandered
they wandered
Present Continuous
I am wandering
you are wandering
he/she/it is wandering
we are wandering
you are wandering
they are wandering
Present Perfect
I have wandered
you have wandered
he/she/it has wandered
we have wandered
you have wandered
they have wandered
Past Continuous
I was wandering
you were wandering
he/she/it was wandering
we were wandering
you were wandering
they were wandering
Past Perfect
I had wandered
you had wandered
he/she/it had wandered
we had wandered
you had wandered
they had wandered
Future
I will wander
you will wander
he/she/it will wander
we will wander
you will wander
they will wander
Future Perfect
I will have wandered
you will have wandered
he/she/it will have wandered
we will have wandered
you will have wandered
they will have wandered
Future Continuous
I will be wandering
you will be wandering
he/she/it will be wandering
we will be wandering
you will be wandering
they will be wandering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been wandering
you have been wandering
he/she/it has been wandering
we have been wandering
you have been wandering
they have been wandering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been wandering
you will have been wandering
he/she/it will have been wandering
we will have been wandering
you will have been wandering
they will have been wandering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been wandering
you had been wandering
he/she/it had been wandering
we had been wandering
you had been wandering
they had been wandering
Conditional
I would wander
you would wander
he/she/it would wander
we would wander
you would wander
they would wander
Past Conditional
I would have wandered
you would have wandered
he/she/it would have wandered
we would have wandered
you would have wandered
they would have wandered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.wander - move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employmentwander - move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employment; "The gypsies roamed the woods"; "roving vagabonds"; "the wandering Jew"; "The cattle roam across the prairie"; "the laborers drift from one town to the next"; "They rolled from town to town"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
maunder - wander aimlessly
gad, gallivant, jazz around - wander aimlessly in search of pleasure
drift, err, stray - wander from a direct course or at random; "The child strayed from the path and her parents lost sight of her"; "don't drift from the set course"
wander - go via an indirect route or at no set pace; "After dinner, we wandered into town"
2.wander - be sexually unfaithful to one's partner in marriagewander - be sexually unfaithful to one's partner in marriage; "She cheats on her husband"; "Might her husband be wandering?"
cozen, deceive, delude, lead on - be false to; be dishonest with
two-time - carry on a romantic relationship with two people at the same time
play around, fool around - commit adultery; "he plays around a lot"
3.wander - go via an indirect route or at no set pace; "After dinner, we wandered into town"
rove, stray, roam, vagabond, wander, swan, ramble, range, drift, tramp, cast, roll - move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employment; "The gypsies roamed the woods"; "roving vagabonds"; "the wandering Jew"; "The cattle roam across the prairie"; "the laborers drift from one town to the next"; "They rolled from town to town"
meander, thread, wind, wander, weave - to move or cause to move in a sinuous, spiral, or circular course; "the river winds through the hills"; "the path meanders through the vineyards"; "sometimes, the gout wanders through the entire body"
go forward, proceed, continue - move ahead; travel onward in time or space; "We proceeded towards Washington"; "She continued in the direction of the hills"; "We are moving ahead in time now"
4.wander - to move or cause to move in a sinuous, spiral, or circular coursewander - to move or cause to move in a sinuous, spiral, or circular course; "the river winds through the hills"; "the path meanders through the vineyards"; "sometimes, the gout wanders through the entire body"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
snake - move along a winding path; "The army snaked through the jungle"
wander - go via an indirect route or at no set pace; "After dinner, we wandered into town"
5.wander - lose clarity or turn aside especially from the main subject of attention or course of argument in writing, thinking, or speaking; "She always digresses when telling a story"; "her mind wanders"; "Don't digress when you give a lecture"
tell - let something be known; "Tell them that you will be late"

wander

verb
1. roam, walk, drift, stroll, range, cruise, stray, ramble, prowl, meander, rove, straggle, traipse (informal), go walkabout (Austral.), mooch around (slang), stravaig (Scot. & Northern English dialect), knock about or around, peregrinate He wandered aimlessly around the garden.
2. stray, roam, digress, get sidetracked, go off at a tangent She allowed her mind to wander to other things.
noun
1. excursion, turn, walk, stroll, cruise, ramble, meander, promenade, traipse (informal), mosey (informal), peregrination Let's go for a wander round the shops.
wander off stray, roam, go astray, lose your way, drift, depart, rove, straggle The child wandered off and got lost.
wander off something deviate from, diverge from, veer from, swerve from, digress from, go off at a tangent from, go off course from, lapse from He has a tendency to wander off the point when he's talking.

wander

verb
1. To move about at random, especially over a wide area:
2. To walk at a leisurely pace:
Informal: mosey.
3. To turn aside, especially from the main subject in writing or speaking:
Idiom: go off at a tangent.
noun
An act of walking, especially for pleasure:
amble, meander (often used in plural), perambulation, promenade, ramble, saunter, stroll, walk.
Translations
تَجْوال، تَطْوافيَتَجَوَّليَتَجَوَّلُيَهيم، يَشْرُد
potulovat setoulka
vandre omkringflakkeslentretur
harhailla
lutati
vándorlás
göngutúrráfa, flækjastreika, vera á reiki
歩き回る
배회하다
vagari
keliavimaskelionių aistraklajojimasklajoti poklejoti
aizklīstaizmaldītiesceļojumsceļotklaiņojums
blúdiť
potikati se
vandra omkringvanka
เดินไปโดยไม่มีจุดหมาย
dolaşmakkaymakdağılmakdolanıp durmakdolanma
đi lang thang

wander

[ˈwɒndəʳ]
A. Npaseo m
to go for or have a wanderpasearse, dar un paseo, dar una vuelta
B. VI
1. (for pleasure) → pasear; (aimlessly) → deambular, vagar, errar
we spent the morning wandering round the old townpasamos la mañana paseando por el casco antiguo
they wandered aimlessly through the streetsiban deambulando or vagando por las calles
to wander round the shopscuriosear or pasearse por las tiendas
2. (= stray) to wander from the pathdesviarse or alejarse del camino
the sheep had wandered into the next fieldlas ovejas se habían metido en el prado de al lado
3. (fig) [person] (in speech) → divagar
to wander from or off the pointsalirse del tema
to let one's mind wanderdejar vagar la imaginación
his eyes wandered round the roompaseó la mirada por la habitación
his attention wandered for a moment and the milk boiled overse distrajo or despistó un momento y se le salió la leche
my attention wandered a bit in the second half of the filmperdí un poco la concentración or me distraje or me despisté en la segunda mitad de la película
C. VT [+ streets, hills] → recorrer, vagar por
to wander the worldrecorrer el mundo entero
he had wandered the seven seas in search of it (liter) → había surcado los siete mares en su busca (liter)
wander about wander around VI + ADVdeambular
wander off
A. VI + ADV the children wandered off into the woodslos niños se alejaron sin rumbo y entraron en el bosque
don't go wandering offno te alejes demasiado
B. VI + PREP
see wander B3

wander

[ˈwɒndər]
vi
(= walk without purpose) → errer
(= stroll) → flâner
to wander around → flâner
I just wandered around for a while → J'ai flâné un peu.
to wander off → partir en vadrouille
[thoughts, mind] → s'égarer
His mind began to wander → Son esprit commença à s'égarer.
My thoughts kept wandering back to that night
BUT Mes pensées revenaient sans cesse à cette nuit.
to wander to [thoughts, mind] → se détourner vers
vt [+ streets, town] → errer dans
nflânerie f
to go for a wander → aller flâner

wander

nSpaziergang m; (through town, park also) → Bummel m; I’m going for a wander (a)round the shopsich mache einen Ladenbummel
vt hills, worlddurchstreifen (geh); to wander the streetsdurch die Straßen wandern or (looking for sb/sth also) → irren
vi
(= walk around casually)herumlaufen; (more aimlessly) → umherwandern (→ through, about in +dat); (leisurely) → schlendern; (to see the shops) → bummeln; he wandered past me in a dreamer ging wie im Traum an mir vorbei; he wandered over to speak to meer kam zu mir herüber, um mit mir zu reden; his hands wandered over the keysseine Hände wanderten über die Tasten; the bus wandered along the lanes for a couple of hoursder Bus zuckelte ein paar Stunden durch die Sträßchen; the river wandered through the valleyder Fluss zog sich durch das Tal; I enjoy just wandering aroundich bummele gerne einfach nur herum; if his hands start wandering … (hum)wenn er seine Finger nicht bei sich (dat)behalten kann …
(= go off, stray) to wander from the pathvom Wege or Pfad abkommen; the cattle must not be allowed to wanderdas Vieh darf nicht einfach so herumlaufen; he wandered too near the edge of the cliffer geriet zu nahe an den Rand des Abhangs; I accidentally wandered into Squire Thomas’ propertyich bin aus Versehen in das Gelände von Squire Thomas geraten; the children had wandered out onto the streetdie Kinder waren auf die Straße gelaufen; the needle tends to wander a bitder Zeiger schwankt ein bisschen
(fig: thoughts, eye) → schweifen, wandern; to let one’s mind wanderseine Gedanken schweifen lassen; during the lecture his mind wandered a bitwährend der Vorlesung wanderten seine Gedanken umher or schweiften seine Gedanken ab; the old man’s mind is beginning to wander a bitder alte Mann wird ein wenig wirr; to wander from the straight and narrowvom Pfad der Tugend abirren or abkommen; to wander off a point/the subjectvon einem Punkt/vom Thema abschweifen or abkommen

wander

[ˈwɒndəʳ]
1. n to go for a wander around the shops/the townfare un giro per i negozi/in città
2. vi (person) → gironzolare, girare senza meta; (river, road) → serpeggiare; (stray, from path) → allontanarsi; (thoughts, eyes) → vagare
to wander back/out → tornare indietro/uscire con calma
don't go wandering off → non allontanarti
to wander from or off the point → divagare
to let one's mind or attention wander → distrarsi
3. vt (streets, hills) → girovagare per
to wander the world → girare il mondo

wander

(ˈwondə) verb
1. to go, move, walk etc (about, in or on) from place to place with no definite destination in mind. I'd like to spend a holiday wandering through France; The mother wandered the streets looking for her child.
2. to go astray or move away from the proper place or home. His mind wanders; My attention was wandering.
noun
an act of wandering. He's gone for a wander round the shops.
ˈwanderer noun
ˈwanderlust noun
the wish to travel. He's always travelling – his wanderlust will never be satisfied.

wander

يَتَجَوَّلُ potulovat se vandre omkring umherwandern περιφέρομαι deambular harhailla errer lutati girovagare 歩き回る 배회하다 rondzwerven vandre wędrować vaguear бродить vandra omkring เดินไปโดยไม่มีจุดหมาย dolaşmak đi lang thang 漫步

wander

v. vagar; [to lose one's way] desviarse, perderse, extraviarse.
References in classic literature ?
The dim, dusty room, with the busts staring down from the tall bookcases, the cozy chairs, the globes, and best of all, the wilderness of books in which she could wander where she liked, made the library a region of bliss to her.
The two girls would wander for miles along the edge of the cornfields, hunting for ground-cherries.
The voice of the sea is seductive; never ceasing, whispering, clamoring, murmuring, inviting the soul to wander for a spell in abysses of solitude; to lose itself in mazes of inward contemplation.
If anything could add to my own base love of life," said Heyward, suffering his unconscious eyes to wander to the youthful form of the silent Alice, "it would be so kind an assurance.
It was on the first of May, in the year 1769, that I resigned my domestic happiness for a time, and left my family and peaceable habitation on the Yadkin River, in North-Carolina, to wander through the wilderness of America, in quest of the country of Kentucke, in company with John Finley, John Stewart, Joseph Holden, James Monay, and William Cool.
But it was a comfort that there could be no uneasiness in a connection with anything so beatific as the radiant image of my little girl, the vision of whose angelic beauty had probably more than anything else to do with the restlessness that, before morning, made me several times rise and wander about my room to take in the whole picture and prospect; to watch, from my open window, the faint summer dawn, to look at such portions of the rest of the house as I could catch, and to listen, while, in the fading dusk, the first birds began to twitter, for the possible recurrence of a sound or two, less natural and not without, but within, that I had fancied I heard.
I told him that I never liked to sleep two in a bed; that if I should ever do so, it would depend upon who the harpooneer might be, and that if he (the landlord) really had no other place for me, and the harpooneer was not decidedly objectionable, why rather than wander further about a strange town on so bitter a night, I would put up with the half of any decent man's blanket.
Some of the men gather about the bar; some wander about, laughing and singing; here and there will be a little group, chanting merrily, and in sublime indifference to the others and to the orchestra as well.
When I wander, her gentler spirit ever restores me, and keeps before my eyes the Christian calling and mission of our race.
My idea was to disguise myself as a freeman of peasant degree and wander through the country a week or two on foot.
I am privileged, because I am known to be honorable and trustworthy, and because I have a distinguished record in the service; so they don't hobble me nor tie me to stakes or shut me tight in stables, but let me wander around to suit myself.
So he used to wander to the neighborhood of the Lei, evenings, with his Zither and "Express his Longing in low Singing," as Garnham says.