wanderer


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wan·der

 (wŏn′dər)
v. wan·dered, wan·der·ing, wan·ders
v.intr.
1. To move about without a definite destination or purpose.
2. To go by an indirect route or at no set pace; amble: We wandered toward town.
3. To proceed in an irregular course; meander: The path wanders through the park.
4. To behave in a manner that does not conform to morality or norms: wander from the path of righteousness.
5. To turn the attention from one subject to another with little clarity or coherence of thought: I had a point to make, but my mind started wandering.
6. To be directed without an object or in various directions: His eyes wandered to the balcony.
v.tr.
1. To wander across or through: wander the forests and fields.
2. To be directed around or over: Her gaze wandered the docks.
n.
The act or an instance of wandering.

[Middle English wanderen, from Old English wandrian.]

wan′der·er n.
wan′der·ing·ly adv.
Synonyms: wander, ramble, roam, rove1, range, meander, stray, gallivant, gad1
These verbs mean to move about at random or without destination or purpose. Wander and ramble stress the absence of a fixed course or goal: The professor wandered down the hall lost in thought. "They would go off together, rambling along the river" (John Galsworthy).
Roam and rove emphasize freedom of movement, often over a wide area: "Herds of horses and cattle roamed at will over the plain" (George W. Cable). "For ten long years I roved about, living first in one capital, then another" (Charlotte Brontë).
Range suggests wandering in all directions: "a large hunting party known to be ranging the prairie" (Francis Parkman).
Meander suggests leisurely wandering over an irregular or winding course: "He meandered to and fro ... observing the manners and customs of Hillport society" (Arnold Bennett).
Stray refers to deviation from a proper course or area: "The camels strayed to graze on the branches of distant acacias" (Jeffrey Tayler).
Gallivant refers to wandering in search of pleasure: gallivanted all over the city during our visit. Gad suggests restlessness: gadded about unaccompanied in foreign places.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wanderer - someone who leads a wandering unsettled lifewanderer - someone who leads a wandering unsettled life
traveler, traveller - a person who changes location
nomad - a member of a people who have no permanent home but move about according to the seasons
drifter, vagrant, vagabond, floater - a wanderer who has no established residence or visible means of support
2.wanderer - a computer program that prowls the internet looking for publicly accessible resources that can be added to a database; the database can then be searched with a search engine
computer program, computer programme, programme, program - (computer science) a sequence of instructions that a computer can interpret and execute; "the program required several hundred lines of code"

wanderer

Translations
مُتَجَوِّل،هائِم، تائِه
tulák
vandrervandringsmand
vándor
ferîalangur
amaçsız gezip duran kimse

wanderer

[ˈwɒndərəʳ] N (= traveller) → viajero/a m/f (pej) → vagabundo/a m/f; (= tribesman, nomad) → nómada mf
the wanderer returns! (hum) → ¡ha vuelto el viajero!
I've always been a wanderernunca he querido establecerme de fijo en un sitio

wanderer

[ˈwɒndər] nvagabond(e) m/f

wanderer

nWandervogel m; the Masai are wanderersdie Massai sind ein Wanderstamm m; that child is a real wandererdas Kind treibt sich überall herum

wanderer

[ˈwɒndərəʳ] ngiramondo m/f inv

wander

(ˈwondə) verb
1. to go, move, walk etc (about, in or on) from place to place with no definite destination in mind. I'd like to spend a holiday wandering through France; The mother wandered the streets looking for her child.
2. to go astray or move away from the proper place or home. His mind wanders; My attention was wandering.
noun
an act of wandering. He's gone for a wander round the shops.
ˈwanderer noun
ˈwanderlust noun
the wish to travel. He's always travelling – his wanderlust will never be satisfied.
References in classic literature ?
You say truly," replied the other; "I am a stranger, and have been a wanderer, sorely against my will.
Was it that this old carpenter had been a life-long wanderer, whose much rolling, to and fro, not only had gathered no moss; but what is more, had rubbed off whatever small outward clingings might have originally pertained to him?
At the other's request he told his story; how he had come to America, and what had happened to him in the stockyards, and how his family had been broken up, and how he had become a wanderer.
Among such was the delicate woman who sits there by the lamp, dropping slow tears, while she prepares the memorials of her own lost one for the outcast wanderer.
Yet, when this cherished volume was now placed in my hand--when I turned over its leaves, and sought in its marvellous pictures the charm I had, till now, never failed to find--all was eerie and dreary; the giants were gaunt goblins, the pigmies malevolent and fearful imps, Gulliver a most desolate wanderer in most dread and dangerous regions.
I am a wanderer and an exile, entirely through the fault of others.
If one forlorn wanderer then pacing the dark streets, could have heard her innocent disclosure, and could have seen the drops of pity kissed away by her husband from the soft blue eyes so loving of that husband, he might have cried to the night--and the words would not have parted from his lips for the first time--
And you," she said, in a voice of touching interest to a wanderer, "you live abroad still?
But he quarrelled with Senzangacona, and became a wanderer.
Tell me, good fellow,'' said he to Wamba, and seconded his speech by a small piece of silver coin, ``the way to Cedric the Saxon's; you cannot be ignorant of it, and it is your duty to direct the wanderer even when his character is less sanctified than ours.
But," continued the prince, "having obeyed the voice of my conscience, I shall count the moments when, with your gracious permission, I may present myself before the King of Bengal, not as a wanderer, but as a prince, to implore the favour of your hand.
The fugitive goat, scared and frightened, ran towards the company as if seeking their protection and then stood still, and the goatherd coming up seized it by the horns and began to talk to it as if it were possessed of reason and understanding: "Ah wanderer, wanderer, Spotty, Spotty; how have you gone limping all this time?