wandering


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Related to wandering: wondering

wan·der

 (wŏn′dər)
v. wan·dered, wan·der·ing, wan·ders
v.intr.
1. To move about without a definite destination or purpose.
2. To go by an indirect route or at no set pace; amble: We wandered toward town.
3. To proceed in an irregular course; meander: The path wanders through the park.
4. To behave in a manner that does not conform to morality or norms: wander from the path of righteousness.
5. To turn the attention from one subject to another with little clarity or coherence of thought: I had a point to make, but my mind started wandering.
6. To be directed without an object or in various directions: His eyes wandered to the balcony.
v.tr.
1. To wander across or through: wander the forests and fields.
2. To be directed around or over: Her gaze wandered the docks.
n.
The act or an instance of wandering.

[Middle English wanderen, from Old English wandrian.]

wan′der·er n.
wan′der·ing·ly adv.
Synonyms: wander, ramble, roam, rove1, range, meander, stray, gallivant, gad1
These verbs mean to move about at random or without destination or purpose. Wander and ramble stress the absence of a fixed course or goal: The professor wandered down the hall lost in thought. "They would go off together, rambling along the river" (John Galsworthy).
Roam and rove emphasize freedom of movement, often over a wide area: "Herds of horses and cattle roamed at will over the plain" (George W. Cable)."For ten long years I roved about, living first in one capital, then another" (Charlotte Brontë).
Range suggests wandering in all directions: "a large hunting party known to be ranging the prairie" (Francis Parkman).
Meander suggests leisurely wandering over an irregular or winding course: "He meandered to and fro ... observing the manners and customs of Hillport society" (Arnold Bennett).
Stray refers to deviation from a proper course or area: "The camels strayed to graze on the branches of distant acacias" (Jeffrey Tayler).
Gallivant refers to wandering in search of pleasure: gallivanted all over the city during our visit. Gad suggests restlessness: gadded about unaccompanied in foreign places.

wan•der•ing

(ˈwɒn dər ɪŋ)

adj.
1. moving from place to place without a fixed plan; roaming.
2. having no permanent residence; nomadic.
3. meandering; winding: a wandering river.
n.
4. an aimless roving about; leisurely traveling from place to place: a summer of delightful wandering through Italy.
5. Usu., wanderings.
a. aimless travels; meanderings.
b. disordered thoughts or utterances; incoherencies
[before 1000]
wan′der•ing•ly, adv.

wandering

  • evagation - Means mental wandering or digression, also a digression in speech or writing.
  • mundivagant - Means "wandering around the world."
  • vagation - The action of wandering, straying, or departing from the proper or regular course.
  • wanderjahr - Literally German for "wander year," it refers to a year of wandering or travel.

Wandering

 of tinkers—Lipton.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wandering - travelling about without any clear destinationwandering - travelling about without any clear destination; "she followed him in his wanderings and looked after him"
travel, traveling, travelling - the act of going from one place to another; "he enjoyed selling but he hated the travel"
drifting - aimless wandering from place to place
Adj.1.wandering - migratory; "a restless mobile society"; "the nomadic habits of the Bedouins"; "believed the profession of a peregrine typist would have a happy future"; "wandering tribes"
unsettled - not settled or established; "an unsettled lifestyle"
2.wandering - of a path e.g.wandering - of a path e.g.; "meandering streams"; "rambling forest paths"; "the river followed its wandering course"; "a winding country road"
indirect - not direct in spatial dimension; not leading by a straight line or course to a destination; "sometimes taking an indirect path saves time"; "you must take an indirect course in sailing"
3.wandering - having no fixed course; "an erratic comet"; "his life followed a wandering course"; "a planetary vagabond"
unsettled - not settled or established; "an unsettled lifestyle"

wandering

wandering

adjective
1. Traveling about, especially in search of adventure:
2. Without a fixed or regular course:
Translations

wandering

[ˈwɒndərɪŋ] ADJ [person] → errante; [tribe] → nómada, errante; [minstrel] → itinerante; [path, river] → sinuoso; [eyes, mind] → distraído
he suffers from wandering hands (hum) → es un sobón

wandering

[ˈwɒndərɪŋ] adj
[tribe] → nomade
[minstrel, actor] → ambulant(e)

wandering

adj tribesman, refugeesumherziehend; minstrelfahrend; thoughts(ab)schweifend; gazeschweifend; pathgewunden; the old man’s wandering minddie wirren Gedanken des Alten; to have wandering hands (hum)seine Finger nicht bei sich (dat)behalten können; the Wandering Jewder Ewige Jude

wandering

[ˈwɒndrɪŋ]
1. adj (tribe) → nomade; (minstrel, actor) → girovago/a; (path, river) → tortuoso/a; (mind) → distratto/a
2. wanderings nplperegrinazioni fpl, vagabondaggi mpl

wan·der·ing

a. errante, errático-a; desviado-a;
___ cellcélula;
___ goiterbocio móvil;
___ paindolor ___;
___ toothdiente desviado.
References in classic literature ?
He read a long debate with the most amiable readiness and then explained it in his most lucid manner, while Meg tried to look deeply interested, to ask intelligent questions, and keep her thoughts from wandering from the state of the nation to the state of her bonnet.
She dreamed of joining some company and wandering over the world, seeing always new faces and giving some- thing out of herself to all people.
Up under the wooden ceiling there were little half-windows with white curtains, and pots of geraniums and wandering Jew in the deep sills.
They're making you a little kinder than usual; but some way I feel as if they were wandering, as if they were not here with me.
If he possessed the power to arrest any wandering eye when exhibiting the glories of his altitude on foot, his equestrian graces were still more likely to attract attention.
Don't you remember, we used to see him before breakfast wandering around the grounds picking flowers?
About this time my brother, Squire Boon, with another adventurer, who came to explore the country shortly after us, was wandering through the forest, determined to find me, if possible, and accidentally found our camp.
Wandering gusts laden with the deep resinous odors of the wood found their way through the imperfect jointure of the two cabins, swept her cheek and even stirred her long, wide-open lashes.
With this thought in her mind, she unbolted a door, cobwebbed and long disused, but which had served as a former medium of communication between her own part of the house and the gable where the wandering daguerreotypist had now established his temporary home.
And here, some six months ago -- pacing from corner to corner, or lounging on the long-legged tool, with his elbow on the desk, and his eyes wandering up and down the columns of the morning newspaper -- you might have recognised, honoured reader, the same individual who welcomed you into his cheery little study, where the sunshine glimmered so pleasantly through the willow branches on the western side of the Old Manse.
Little Sebastijonas, aged three, had been wandering about oblivious to all things, holding turned up over his mouth a bottle of liquid known as "pop," pink-colored, ice-cold, and delicious.
Clare, his eyes wandering dreamily, and speaking to himself.