wanton


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wan·ton

 (wŏn′tən)
adj.
1.
a. Lascivious or promiscuous. Used especially of women.
b. Exciting or expressing sexual desire: a wanton pose.
2. Marked by unprovoked, gratuitous maliciousness; capricious and unjust: wanton destruction.
3. Unrestrainedly excessive: wanton extravagance.
4. Luxuriant; overabundant: wanton tresses.
5. Frolicsome; playful: a wanton fawn.
6. Obsolete Rebellious; refractory.
intr.v. wan·toned, wan·ton·ing, wan·tons
1. To behave in a wanton manner; act lasciviously.
2. To move idly or playfully.
n.
One, especially a woman, who is licentious or promiscuous.

[Middle English wantowen : wan-, not, lacking (from Old English; see euə- in Indo-European roots) + towen, past participle of teen, to bring up (from Old English tēon, to lead, draw; see deuk- in Indo-European roots).]

wan′ton·ly adv.
wan′ton·ness n.

wanton

(ˈwɒntən)
adj
1. dissolute, licentious, or immoral
2. without motive, provocation, or justification: wanton destruction.
3. maliciously and unnecessarily cruel or destructive
4. unrestrained: wanton spending.
5. archaic or poetic playful or capricious
6. archaic (of vegetation, etc) luxuriant or superabundant
n
7. a licentious person, esp a woman
8. a playful or capricious person
vb
9. (intr) to behave in a wanton manner
10. (tr) to squander or waste
[C13 wantowen (in the obsolete sense: unmanageable, unruly): from wan- (prefix equivalent to un-1; related to Old English wanian to wane) + -towen, from Old English togen brought up, from tēon to bring up]
ˈwantonly adv
ˈwantonness n

wan•ton

(ˈwɒn tn)

adj.
1. done maliciously or unjustifiably: wanton cruelty.
2. deliberate and without motive; unprovoked: a wanton attack.
3. without regard for what is right, just, etc.; reckless: wanton assassination of a person's character.
4. sexually unrestrained; lascivious; lewd: wanton behavior.
5. extravagant or excessive: living in wanton luxury.
6. luxuriant, as vegetation.
7. Archaic.
a. sportive or frolicsome, as children or young animals.
b. having free play: wanton breezes.
c. cruelly playful; mischievous: wanton schoolboys.
n.
8. a wanton or lascivious person, esp. a woman.
v.i.
9. to behave in a wanton manner.
v.t.
10. to squander (often fol. by away): to wanton away one's inheritance.
[1250–1300; Middle English wantowen literally, undisciplined, ill-reared, Old English wan- not + togen past participle of tēon to discipline, rear, c. German ziehen, Latin dūcere to lead; akin to tow1]
wan′ton•ly, adv.
wan′ton•ness, n.

wanton


Past participle: wantoned
Gerund: wantoning

Imperative
wanton
wanton
Present
I wanton
you wanton
he/she/it wantons
we wanton
you wanton
they wanton
Preterite
I wantoned
you wantoned
he/she/it wantoned
we wantoned
you wantoned
they wantoned
Present Continuous
I am wantoning
you are wantoning
he/she/it is wantoning
we are wantoning
you are wantoning
they are wantoning
Present Perfect
I have wantoned
you have wantoned
he/she/it has wantoned
we have wantoned
you have wantoned
they have wantoned
Past Continuous
I was wantoning
you were wantoning
he/she/it was wantoning
we were wantoning
you were wantoning
they were wantoning
Past Perfect
I had wantoned
you had wantoned
he/she/it had wantoned
we had wantoned
you had wantoned
they had wantoned
Future
I will wanton
you will wanton
he/she/it will wanton
we will wanton
you will wanton
they will wanton
Future Perfect
I will have wantoned
you will have wantoned
he/she/it will have wantoned
we will have wantoned
you will have wantoned
they will have wantoned
Future Continuous
I will be wantoning
you will be wantoning
he/she/it will be wantoning
we will be wantoning
you will be wantoning
they will be wantoning
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been wantoning
you have been wantoning
he/she/it has been wantoning
we have been wantoning
you have been wantoning
they have been wantoning
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been wantoning
you will have been wantoning
he/she/it will have been wantoning
we will have been wantoning
you will have been wantoning
they will have been wantoning
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been wantoning
you had been wantoning
he/she/it had been wantoning
we had been wantoning
you had been wantoning
they had been wantoning
Conditional
I would wanton
you would wanton
he/she/it would wanton
we would wanton
you would wanton
they would wanton
Past Conditional
I would have wantoned
you would have wantoned
he/she/it would have wantoned
we would have wantoned
you would have wantoned
they would have wantoned
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wanton - lewd or lascivious womanwanton - lewd or lascivious woman    
sensualist - a person who enjoys sensuality
light-of-love, light-o'-love - a woman inconstant in love
Verb1.wanton - waste timewanton - waste time; spend one's time idly or inefficiently
expend, spend, drop - pay out; "spend money"
2.wanton - indulge in a carefree or voluptuous way of lifewanton - indulge in a carefree or voluptuous way of life
live - lead a certain kind of life; live in a certain style; "we had to live frugally after the war"
3.wanton - spend wastefullywanton - spend wastefully; "wanton one's money away"
expend, spend, drop - pay out; "spend money"
4.wanton - become extravagant; indulge (oneself) luxuriously
ware, squander, consume, waste - spend extravagantly; "waste not, want not"
5.wanton - engage in amorous play
chat up, coquet, coquette, flirt, mash, philander, romance, dally, butterfly - talk or behave amorously, without serious intentions; "The guys always try to chat up the new secretaries"; "My husband never flirts with other women"
6.wanton - behave extremely cruelly and brutally
behave, act, do - behave in a certain manner; show a certain behavior; conduct or comport oneself; "You should act like an adult"; "Don't behave like a fool"; "What makes her do this way?"; "The dog acts ferocious, but he is really afraid of people"
Adj.1.wanton - occurring without motivation or provocationwanton - occurring without motivation or provocation; "motiveless malignity"; "unprovoked and dastardly attack"- F.D.Roosevelt
unmotivated - without motivation
2.wanton - casual and unrestrained in sexual behaviorwanton - casual and unrestrained in sexual behavior; "her easy virtue"; "he was told to avoid loose (or light) women"; "wanton behavior"
unchaste - not chaste; "unchaste conduct"

wanton

noun
1. slut, tart, whore, slag (Brit. slang), swinger (informal), harlot, slapper (Brit. slang), loose woman, scrubber (Brit. & Austral. slang), strumpet, trollop, woman of easy virtue His wife had shown herself to be a shameless wanton.

wanton

adjective
2. Marked by an absence of conventional restraint in sexual behavior; sexually unrestrained:
3. Not required, necessary, or warranted by the circumstances of the case:
noun
1. An immoral or licentious person:
2. A vulgar promiscuous woman who flouts propriety:
Slang: floozy.
Translations
طائِش، مُتَهَوِّر،جائِر، لا مُبَرِّر لَهلَعوب، داعِر، لا أخْلاقي
formålsløshensynsløs
ledér
ástæîulauslostafullur, léttúîugur
beprasmiškumas
bezatbildīgsbezjēdzīgsizlaidīgsneprātīgsnetikls
nepočestný
ahlâksıznedensiz

wanton

[ˈwɒntən] ADJ
1. (= wilful, gratuitous) [neglect] → displicente; [destruction] → sin sentido, gratuito; [violence] → gratuito
2. (o.f., pej) (= dissolute) [woman] → lascivo, libertino; [behaviour] → disipado, inmoral
3. (= unrestrained) [spending] → desenfrenado

wanton

[ˈwɒntən] adj [act, destruction, vandalism] → gratuit(e)

wanton

adj
(= licentious) lifeliederlich; behaviour, woman, pleasuresschamlos; looks, thoughtslüstern; Cupid, that wanton boy (liter)Amor, dieser kleine Lüstling
(= wilful) cruelty, destructionmutwillig; disregard, negligencesträflich, völlig unverantwortlich; wastesträflich, kriminell (inf); to spend money with wanton extravaganceGeld mit sträflichem Leichtsinn ausgeben; decorated with wanton extravaganceüppig und verschwenderisch eingerichtet
(poet: = capricious) personsübermütig, mutwillig (poet)
n (old: = immoral woman) → Dirne f

wanton

[ˈwɒntən] adj (wilful) → gratuito/a, ingiustificato/a; (shameless, woman) → scostumato/a

wanton

(ˈwontən) adjective
1. without reason; motiveless. wanton cruelty; the wanton destruction of property.
2. (of a person) immoral. wanton young women.
ˈwantonly adverb
ˈwantonness noun
References in classic literature ?
Though the arts of peace were unknown to this fatal region, its forests were alive with men; its shades and glens rang with the sounds of martial music, and the echoes of its mountains threw back the laugh, or repeated the wanton cry, of many a gallant and reckless youth, as he hurried by them, in the noontide of his spirits, to slumber in a long night of forgetfulness.
For it was set apart and sanctified to one awe-striking end; and however wanton in their sailor ways, one and all, the mariners revered it as the white whale's talisman.
I was very sorry for her -- indeed, any one would have been, for she was really suffering; so I was willing to do anything that was reasonable, and had no desire to carry things to wanton extremities.
He brought home with him a suit of clothes of such exquisite style and cut in fashion-- Eastern fashion, city fashion--that it filled everybody with anguish and was regarded as a peculiarly wanton affront.
Do not think yourself excused by any weakness, any natural defect of understanding on her side, in the wanton cruelty so evident on yours.
There were ruddy, brown-faced, broad-girthed Spanish Friars, and winking from their shelves in wanton slyness at the girls as they went by, and glanced demurely at the hung-up mistletoe.
To have imposed any derogatory work upon him, would have been to inflict a wanton insult on the feelings of a most respectable man.
I care not for those ladies Who must be wooed and prayed; Give me kind Amaryllis, The wanton country-maid.
PEOR his other Name, when he entic'd ISRAEL in SITTIM on their march from NILE To do him wanton rites, which cost them woe.
In this manner did Prince John endeavour to lay the foundation of a popularity, which he was perpetually throwing down by some inconsiderate act of wanton aggression upon the feelings and prejudices of the people.
Sometimes when he was down at his great house in Nottinghamshire, entertaining the fashionable young men of his own rank who were his chief companions, and astounding the county by the wanton luxury and gorgeous splendour of his mode of life, he would suddenly leave his guests and rush back to town to see that the door had not been tampered with and that the picture was still there.
Men of prudence and discretion, Courtiers gay and gallant knights, With the wanton damsels dally, But the modest take to wife.