ward off


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Related to ward off: point out, out of commission, wreak havoc

ward

 (wôrd)
n.
1.
a. A room in a hospital usually holding six or more patients.
b. A division in a hospital for the care of a particular group of patients: a maternity ward.
2.
a. A division of a city or town, especially an electoral district, for administrative and representative purposes.
b. A district of some English and Scottish counties corresponding roughly to the hundred or the wapentake.
3. One of the divisions of a penal institution, such as a prison.
4. An open court or area of a castle or fortification enclosed by walls.
5.
a. Law A minor or a person deemed legally incompetent.
b. A person under the protection or care of another.
6. Archaic
a. The act of guarding or protecting; guardianship.
b. The act of keeping watch or being a lookout.
c. The state of being under guard; custody.
7. A defensive movement or attitude, especially in fencing; a guard.
8.
a. The projecting ridge of a lock or keyhole that prevents the turning of a key other than the proper one.
b. The notch cut into a key that corresponds to such a ridge.
tr.v. ward·ed, ward·ing, wards Archaic
To guard; protect.
Phrasal Verb:
ward off
1. To turn aside; parry: ward off an opponent's blows.
2. To try to prevent; avert: took vitamins to ward off head colds.

[Middle English, action of guarding, from Old English weard, a watching, protection; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

ward off

vb
(tr, adverb) to turn aside or repel; avert
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.ward off - prevent the occurrence ofward off - prevent the occurrence of; prevent from happening; "Let's avoid a confrontation"; "head off a confrontation"; "avert a strike"
foreclose, forestall, preclude, prevent, forbid - keep from happening or arising; make impossible; "My sense of tact forbids an honest answer"; "Your role in the projects precludes your involvement in the competitive project"
2.ward off - avert, turn away, or repelward off - avert, turn away, or repel; "Ward off danger"
defend - be on the defensive; act against an attack

ward

noun
1. A person who relies on another for support:
2. The state of being detained by legal authority:
3. The act or a means of defending:
4. A person or special body of persons assigned to provide protection or keep watch over, for example:
verb
1. To keep safe from danger, attack, or harm:
Archaic: fend.
2. To prohibit from occurring by advance planning or action.Also used with off:
phrasal verb
ward off
To turn or drive away:
Translations

w>ward off

vt sep attack, blow, person, evil spiritsabwehren; danger also, recessionabwenden; depressionnicht aufkommen lassen
References in classic literature ?
The use of their pocket electric lights was a great help, and possibly served to ward off the attacks of jungle beasts, for as they tramped along they could hear stealthy sounds in the underbush on either side of the path, as though tigers were stalking them.
Even should I break one of them with my first blow, for I figured that he would attempt to ward off the cudgel, he could reach out and annihilate me with the others before I could recover for a second attack.
How could you, my poor little unfledged nestling, find yourself food, and defend yourself from misfortune, and ward off the wiles of evil men?
The adjutant by his elaborate courtesy appeared to wish to ward off any attempt at familiarity on the part of the Russian messenger.
And to ward off any envious attempts of another Isaac Boxtel, he wrote over his door the lines which Grotius had, on the day of his flight, scratched on the walls of his prison: --
MacConnell put his hand in front of her to ward off some dark object.
But let us consider this further point: Is not he who can best strike a blow in a boxing match or in any kind of fighting best able to ward off a blow?
The shield, long and oval, is utilized more as back-armor than as a defense against frontal attack, for the close-set armlets of gold upon the left forearm are principally depended upon to ward off knife, spear, hatchet, or arrow from in front; but against the greater carnivora and the attacks of several human antagonists, the shield is utilized to its best advantage and carried by loops upon the left arm.
Amy was ordered off at once, and provided with something to ward off danger, she departed in great state, with Jo and Laurie as escort.
Therefore I am going to call down fire and blow up your tower, but it is only fair to give you a chance; now if you think you can break my enchantments and ward off the fires, step to the bat, it's your innings.
Her character will be fixed, and she will, at sixteen, be the most determined flirt that ever made herself or her family ridiculous; a flirt, too, in the worst and meanest degree of flirtation; without any attraction beyond youth and a tolerable person; and, from the ignorance and emptiness of her mind, wholly unable to ward off any portion of that universal contempt which her rage for admiration will excite.
What was to be done to ward off a blow which threatened annihilation?