wareroom

ware·room

 (wâr′ro͞om′, -ro͝om′)
n.
A room used for the storage or display of goods or wares.

wareroom

(ˈwɛəˌrʊm)
n
(Commerce) a room used to store or display goods
References in classic literature ?
The dry-goods stores were not down among the counting-houses, banks, and wholesale warerooms, where gentlemen most do congregate, but Jo found herself in that part of the city before she did a single errand, loitering along as if waiting for someone, examining engineering instruments in one window and samples of wool in another, with most unfeminine interest, tumbling over barrels, being half-smothered by descending bales, and hustled unceremoniously by busy men who looked as if they wondered `how the deuce she got there'.
Moreau can certainly find in his warerooms a bed to match the hangings.
While Tulles lived in Halifax, the phenomenon of the furniture wareroom became established in the city, about a decade after it had reached Boston and Montreal.
We know that Tulles operated his own wareroom, as indicated on his label.
The Warerooms bar and Euro Hostel, in Carliol Square, Newcastle, opened today and will provide 256 beds.