was


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was

 (wŭz, wŏz; wəz when unstressed)
v.
First and third person singular past indicative of be. See Note at you-uns.

[Middle English, from Old English wæs; see wes- in Indo-European roots.]

was

(wɒz; unstressed wəz)
vb
1. the past tense (indicative mood) of be1
2. not standard a form of the subjunctive mood used in place of were, esp in conditional sentences: if the film was to be with you, would you be able to process it?.
[Old English wæs, from wesan to be; related to Old Frisian, Old High German was, Old Norse var]

be

(bi; unstressed bi, bɪ)

v. and auxiliary v., pres. sing. 1st pers. am, 2nd are, 3rd is, pres. pl. are; past sing. 1st pers. was, 2nd were, 3rd was, past pl. were; pres. subj. be; past subj. sing. 1st, 2nd, and 3rd pers. were; past subj. pl. were; past part. been; pres. part. be•ing. v.i.
1. to exist or live: Shakespeare's “To be or not to be” is the ultimate question.
2. to take place; occur: The wedding was last week.
3. to occupy a place or position: The book is on the table.
4. to continue or remain as before: Let things be.
5. to belong; attend; befall: May good fortune be with you.
6. (used as a copula to connect the subject with its predicate adjective, or predicate nominative, in order to describe, identify, or amplify the subject): He is tall. She is president.
7. (used as a copula to introduce or form interrogative or imperative sentences): Is that right? Be quiet!
auxiliary verb.
8. (used with the present participle of another verb to form progressive tenses): I am waiting. We were talking.
9. (used with the infinitive of the principal verb to indicate a command, arrangements, or future action): He is to see me today. You are not to leave before six.
10. (used with the past participle of another verb to form the passive voice): The date was fixed.
11. (used in archaic or literary constructions with some intransitive verbs to form perfect tenses): He is come.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English bēon; akin to Old Frisian, Old High German bim (I) am, Latin fuī (I) have been, Greek phýein to grow, become]
usage: See me.

Be


Chem. Symbol.
beryllium.

be-

a prefix with the original sense “about,” “around,” “all over,” hence having an intensive and often disparaging force; used as a verb formative (becloud; besiege), and often serving to form transitive verbs from intransitives or from nouns: belabor; befriend; belittle.
[Middle English, Old English, unstressed form of by1]

B.E.

1. Bachelor of Education.
2. Bachelor of Engineering.
Translations

be

(biː) present tense am (am) are (aː) , is (iz) : past tense was (woz) , were (wəː) : present participle ˈbeing: past participle been (biːn, (American) bin) : subjunctive were (wəː) : short forms I'm (aim) (I am), you're (juə) (you are), he's (hiːz) (he is), she's (ʃiːz) (she is), it's (its) (it is), we're (wiə) (we are), they're (θeə) (they are): negative short forms isn't (ˈiznt) (is not), aren't (aːnt) (are not), wasn't (ˈwoznt) (was not), weren't (wəːnt) (were not) – verb
1. used with a present participle to form the progressive or continuous tenses. I'm reading; I am being followed; What were you saying?.
2. used with a present participle to form a type of future tense. I'm going to London.
3. used with a past participle to form the passive voice. He was shot.
4. used with an infinitive to express several ideas, eg necessity (When am I to leave?), purpose (The letter is to tell us he's coming), a possible future happening (If he were to lose, I'd win) etc.
5. used in giving or asking for information about something or someone. I am Mr Smith; Is he alive?; She wants to be an actress; The money will be ours; They are being silly.
ˈbeing noun
1. existence. When did the Roman Empire come into being?
2. any living person or thing. beings from outer space.
the be-all and end-all
the final aim apart from which nothing is of any real importance. This job isn't the be-all and end-all of existence.

was

pret. of to be.
References in classic literature ?
I was lying when I said just now that I was a spiteful official.
It was Harold who first made us acquainted, when I was dining one night at the Cafe Britannique, in Soho.
Dunster, in his night clothes, was sitting on the side of the bed.
There was once a Darning-needle who thought herself so fine that she believed she was an embroidery-needle.
And last night, when I was in Rataziaev's rooms, one of his friends began to read a scribbled note which I had written to you, and then inadvertently pulled out of my pocket.
And, gathering her work together, she was hastening away, when Elizabeth called out:
He is not my private friend and public patron, as Steerforth was, but I hold him in a reverential respect.
But of the many falsehoods told by them, there was one which quite amazed me;--I mean when they said that you should be upon your guard and not allow yourselves to be deceived by the force of my eloquence.
I was in such an irritated frame of mind that in rude and abrupt fashion I blurted out a question as to "why our Marquis de Griers had ceased to accompany her for strolls, or to speak to her for days together.
At that age I became acquainted with the celebrated poets of our own country; but it was only when it had ceased to be in my power to derive its most important benefits from such a conviction that I perceived the necessity of becoming acquainted with more languages than that of my native country.
Don Antonio, eager to make his acquaintance, entered also; a squire came out to meet him and remove his armour, and he shut himself into a lower room, still attended by Don Antonio, whose bread would not bake until he had found out who he was.
His mother was one of my oldest and dearest friends, and he has inherited many of her engaging and endearing qualities.