washhouse


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Related to washhouse: Laundromat

washhouse

(ˈwɒʃˌhaʊs)
n
(Building) (formerly) a building or outbuilding in which laundry was done
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.washhouse - a building or outbuilding where laundry is donewashhouse - a building or outbuilding where laundry is done
laundry - workplace where clothes are washed and ironed
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References in classic literature ?
There were no pots and pans; there was no copper in the washhouse, nor even an ironing-board in the maids' room.
In addition to cooking and working as a nurse, she also kept a washhouse, which she advertised in a local newspaper.
In 1961 my mother had just returned from two hours at the sweatshop that was her local washhouse on Netherfield Road.
He also performed routine maintenance, such as policing the grounds for trash, cleaning a washhouse, landscaping, cleaning building exteriors, raking leaves, and taking out and retrieving recycling bins.
What on Earth was one supposed to do with a goldfish as the folks who lived around, I doubt, had anything that resembled an aquarium - just a jamjar to sit on the washhouse shelf was enough I suppose, but at least it was some kind of a pet.
In the summer the street forms a kind of general washhouse and women, in a semi-state of nudity, whose clothes are often nothing but a collection of dirty rags with old earthenware pans placed on broken chairs occupy the day, give an appearance of cleanness to their children's clothing.
I, like my father was born and bred in Sandyford and can remember well people going to the washhouse as they did not have the facilities at home.
One day the lady in the washhouse tell me Rake a sick man, sure to die.
To the rear is an elevated grass garden with flower and shrub borders, a stone and part brick former washhouse and adjoining orchard and a former external wc.
D]own at our Mill we had our Washhouse and a detachment of women had at their turn, as it was our rule to do, been engaged in Washing, and were just on their way home when this accident occurred.
Rumour has it that recently he [James Field] got up in his sleep and adjourned to the washhouse from which there presently came a sound of chanting accompanied with vigorous stamping of feet; and on the astonished Night Operator going to see what was the matter, he found the Pontiff [Gillen], artistically decorated with Day and Martin [sic], and with fancy patterns in Postage Stamp selvage bestowed over his ample person, corroboreeing away like an Aroondah [Arrernte] warrior
from mountain trails up to lost gold or silver mines to an old washhouse built on a hot spring, now half tumbled on to the banks of the Rio Grande.