watchword


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Related to watchword: disinter

watch·word

 (wŏch′wûrd′)
n.
1. A prearranged reply to a challenge, as from a guard or sentry; a password.
2. A rallying cry: Let our watchword be freedom.

watchword

(ˈwɒtʃˌwɜːd)
n
1. another word for password
2. a rallying cry or slogan

watch•word

(ˈwɒtʃˌwɜrd)

n.
1. a word or short phrase to be communicated, on challenge, to a sentinel; password.
2. a word or phrase expressive of a principle or rule of action; slogan.
3. a rallying cry of a party, club, team, etc.
[1350–1400]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.watchword - a slogan used to rally support for a cause; "a cry to arms"; "our watchword will be `democracy'"
catchword, motto, shibboleth, slogan - a favorite saying of a sect or political group
2.watchword - a secret word or phrase known only to a restricted groupwatchword - a secret word or phrase known only to a restricted group; "he forgot the password"
arcanum, secret - information known only to a special group; "the secret of Cajun cooking"
positive identification - evidence proving that you are who you say you are; evidence establishing that you are among the group of people already known to the system; recognition by the system leads to acceptance; "a system for positive identification can prevent the use of a single identity by several people"

watchword

noun motto, slogan, maxim, byword, rallying cry, battle cry, catch phrase, tag-line, catchword Caution has always been one of Mr Allan's watchwords.
Translations
كَلِمَة السِّر
slagord
slagorî, einkunnarorî

watchword

[ˈwɒtʃwɜːd] N (Mil, Pol) → contraseña f; (= motto) → lema m, consigna f

watchword

[ˈwɒtʃwɜːrd] n (= motto) → mot m d'ordre

watchword

[ˈwɒtʃˌwɜːd] nparola d'ordine

watch

(wotʃ) noun
1. a small instrument for telling the time by, worn on the wrist or carried in the pocket of a waistcoat etc. He wears a gold watch; a wrist-watch.
2. a period of standing guard during the night. I'll take the watch from two o'clock till six.
3. in the navy etc, a group of officers and men who are on duty at a given time. The night watch come(s) on duty soon.
verb
1. to look at (someone or something). He was watching her carefully; He is watching television.
2. to keep a lookout (for). They've gone to watch for the ship coming in; Could you watch for the postman?
3. to be careful of (someone or something). Watch (that) you don't fall off!; Watch him! He's dangerous.
4. to guard or take care of. Watch the prisoner and make sure he doesn't escape; Please watch the baby while I go shopping.
5. to wait for (a chance, opportunity etc). Watch your chance, and then run.
ˈwatcher noun
ˈwatchful adjective
alert and cautious. watchful eyes; If you are watchful you will not be robbed.
ˈwatchfully adverb
ˈwatchfulness noun
ˈwatchdog noun
a dog which guards someone's property etc. We leave a watchdog in our office at night to scare away thieves.
ˈwatchmaker noun
a person who makes and repairs watches, clocks etc.
ˈwatchman noun
(often ˌnight-ˈwatchman) a man employed to guard a building etc against thieves, especially at night. The bank-robbers shot the (night-)watchman.
ˈwatchtower noun
an old word for a tower on which a lookout is posted.
ˈwatchword noun
a motto or slogan used by members of a group of people who think (or act) alike. Let freedom be our watchword!
keep watch
to be on guard. He kept watch while the other soldiers slept.
watch one's step
to be careful what one does or says. He's in a bad mood, so watch your step and don't say anything wrong!
watch out (with for)
to be careful (of). Watch out for the cars!; Watch out! The police are coming!
watch over
to guard or take care of. The mother bird is watching over her young.
References in classic literature ?
The boys addressed responded the invariable "Yes, Mas'r," for ages the watchword of poor Africa; but it's to be owned they did not look particularly cheerful; they had their various little prejudices in favor of wives, mothers, sisters, and children, seen for the last time,--and though "they that wasted them required of them mirth," it was not instantly forthcoming.
Fight and fall, but fly not," that was our watchword.
Man had been content to live in ease and delight upon the labours of his fellow-man, had taken Necessity as his watchword and excuse, and in the fullness of time Necessity had come home to him.
And the three friends did not exchange another word till they reached their quarters, except to give the watchword to the sentinels.
And he who becomes master of a city accustomed to freedom and does not destroy it, may expect to be destroyed by it, for in rebellion it has always the watchword of liberty and its ancient privileges as a rallying point, which neither time nor benefits will ever cause it to forget.
that is their mean yet mighty byword of reproach -- the watchword with which they assassinated, hanged, and made away with Concini; and if I gave them their way they would assassinate, hang, and make away with me in the same manner, although they have nothing to complain of except a tax or two now and then.
When the sheriff thought time enough had elapsed for the different divisions of his force to arrive at their stations, he raised his voice in the silence of the forest, and shouted the watchword.
The very name of a Sioux became a watchword of terror.
George, from boyhood up, had been raised in that school of thought whose watchword is 'Findings are keepings', and, having ascertained that there was no address attached to the name, he was on the point, I regret to say, of pouching the volume, which already he looked upon as his own, when a figure detached itself from the crowd, and he found himself gazing into a pair of grey and, to his startled conscience, accusing eyes.
They still piled the brushwood round the base of the tower, and gambolled hand in hand around the blaze, screaming out the doggerel lines which had long been the watchword of the Jacquerie:
On that couplet I slept at last, and it was my text and watchword when I awoke in the morning.
Our steamboat came up directly this had left the wharf, and soon bore us to the mouth of the Niagara; where the stars and stripes of America flutter on one side and the Union Jack of England on the other: and so narrow is the space between them that the sentinels in either fort can often hear the watchword of the other country given.