wax moth

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wax moth

n.
A moth (Galleria mellonella) that lays its eggs in beehives, where the larvae feed on the wax and debris of the honeycombs.

wax moth

n
(Animals) a brown pyralid moth, Galleria mellonella, the larvae of which feed on the combs of beehives. Also called: honeycomb moth or bee moth

bee′ moth`


n.
a moth, Galleria mellonella, the larvae of which feed on honeycombs in beehives. Also called wax moth.
[1820–30, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wax moth - moth whose larvae live in and feed on bee honeycombswax moth - moth whose larvae live in and feed on bee honeycombs
pyralid, pyralid moth - usually tropical slender-bodied long-legged moth whose larvae are crop pests
Galleria, genus Galleria - a genus of Pyralidae
References in periodicals archive ?
Wax moths lay their eggs inside beehives, where the worms hatch and grow on beeswax--whence they get their name.
And beehives are the target of pests such as varroa mites, ants, wax moths, and mice.
During the study, participating beekeepers also reported an off-odor emanating from combs that had been treated for wax moths or small hive beetles and placed back into hive boxes.
Active and strong honey bee colonies can protect themselves from the effects of wax moths; damage caused by the greater wax moth can, however, be very serious, especially in comb stores, weakened or queenless colonies (Mangum 1989; Caron 1992).
Researchers in Scotland played high-pitched tones for greater wax moths (one shown) and used a laser to measure nanometer-sized vibrations of the moths' tympanal membranes, structures similar to human eardrums.
Wax moths are a serious honeybee pest whose larvae consume wax and pollen, often completely destroying honeycomb.
In the light of the above-mentioned, the registration of NeemAzal T/S and Xen Tari for protection of honey bees against wax moths and Varroa mite should be considered.
Varroa, Wax Moths, American foulbrood, Chalkbrood, Cripaviridae & CCD (Colony Collapse Disorder).
Among these are the two wax moths Achroia grisella F.
Wax moths usually appear in weak or sick colonies, but do not directly contribute to bee deaths.
Even typical predators such as wax moths avoid the newly abandoned hives for a week or more, according to a report by the Mid-Atlantic Apicultural Research and Extension Consortium.
Clayton first gave jays larvae of wax moths and had the birds discover that after a certain amount of time the larvae rot.