waxed


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Related to waxed: waxed lyrical, Waze

wax 1

 (wăks)
n.
1.
a. Any of various natural, oily or greasy heat-sensitive substances, consisting of hydrocarbons or esters of fatty acids that are insoluble in water but soluble in nonpolar organic solvents.
b. Beeswax.
c. Earwax.
2.
a. A solid plastic or pliable liquid substance, such as ozocerite or paraffin, originating from petroleum and found in rock layers and used in paper coating, as insulation, in crayons, and often in medicinal preparations.
b. A preparation containing wax used for polishing floors and other surfaces.
3. A resinous mixture used by shoemakers to rub on thread.
4. A cosmetic procedure in which facial or body hair is removed by peeling away a layer of wax that has been allowed to harden.
adj.
Made of wax: a wax candle.
tr.v. waxed, wax·ing, wax·es
1. To coat, treat, or polish with wax.
2.
a. To remove (facial or body hair) by covering the skin with a layer of wax that is peeled off after hardening, uprooting the encased hairs.
b. To remove hair from (a portion of the body) by this method.
Idiom:
on wax
Informal In the medium of phonograph recordings.

[Middle English, from Old English weax.]

wax 2

 (wăks)
intr.v. waxed, wax·ing, wax·es
1. To increase gradually in size, number, strength, or intensity: "His love affair with Mrs. Bernstein waxed and waned and waxed again" (C. Hugh Holman).
2. To show a progressively larger illuminated area, as the moon does in passing from new to full.
3.
a. To grow or become as specified: "His very body had waxed old in lowly service of the Lord" (James Joyce).
b. To speak or write as specified: "[He] warmed to his most favorite of subjects, waxed eloquent, gained in his face a glow of passion" (Paul J. Willis).
Phrasal Verb:
wax on
To speak or write at length about something: "Mason waxed on and on about the old days" (Jennifer Cruisie).

[Middle English waxen, from Old English weaxan; see aug- in Indo-European roots.]

wax 3

 (wăks)
n. Chiefly British
A fit of anger: "All at once you would suddenly find yourself reverting to childish attitudes, flaring up in a wax with some fellow" (Frank O'Connor).

[Perhaps from wax (as in archaic to wax angry, to grow angry).]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.waxed - treated with waxwaxed - treated with wax; "waxed floors"; "waxed mustache"
unwaxed - not waxed; "the unwaxed floor"
Translations
مُشَمَّع، مَطْلي بالشَّمْع
vokspapir
viaszos
vaxborinn
voskovaný
mumluyağlı

waxed

[wækst] ADJ [paper] → encerado; [jacket] → impermeabilizado

waxed

adjgewachst; moustachegewichst; waxed cottongewachster Baumwollstoff; waxed paperWachspapier nt; waxed jacketWachsjacke f

wax1

(wӕks) noun
1. the sticky, fatty substance of which bees make their cells; beeswax.
2. the sticky, yellowish substance formed in the ears.
3. a manufactured, fatty substance used in polishing, to give a good shine. furniture wax.
4. (also adjective) (also ˈcandle-wax) (of) a substance made from paraffin, used in making candles, models etc, that melts when heated. a wax model.
5. sealing-wax.
verb
to smear, polish or rub with wax.
waxed adjective
having a coating of wax. waxed paper.
ˈwaxen, ˈwaxy adjective
ˈwaxwork noun
a wax model (usually of a well-known person).
ˈwaxworks noun plural
an exhibition of such models.
References in classic literature ?
Gaining the more open water, the bracing breeze waxed fresh; the little Moss tossed the quick foam from her bows, as a young colt his snortings.
To the right there is a door from the saloon, with a few loafers in the doorway, and in the corner beyond it a bar, with a presiding genius clad in soiled white, with waxed black mustaches and a carefully oiled curl plastered against one side of his forehead.
But Sir Gawaine, fro it passed nine of the clock, waxed by the space of three hours ever stronger and stronger.
The dispute between us waxed warm, and I finally said, with a pretense of being in earnest:
The summer weeks dragged by, and then the political campaign opened-- opened in pretty warm fashion, and waxed hotter and hotter daily.
Neither of them possessed energy or wit to belabour me soundly, but they insulted me as coarsely as they could in their little way: especially Celine, who even waxed rather brilliant on my personal defects--deformities she termed them.
I suppose Catherine fulfilled her project, for the next sentence took up another subject: she waxed lachrymose.