way of life


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ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.way of life - a course of conductway of life - a course of conduct; "the path of virtue"; "we went our separate ways"; "our paths in life led us apart"; "genius usually follows a revolutionary path"
course of action, course - a mode of action; "if you persist in that course you will surely fail"; "once a nation is embarked on a course of action it becomes extremely difficult for any retraction to take place"
ambages - (archaic) roundabout or mysterious ways of action
primrose path - a life of ease and pleasure
straight and narrow, strait and narrow - the way of proper and honest behavior; "he taught his children to keep strictly to the straight and narrow"
Sunna, Sunnah, hadith - (Islam) the way of life prescribed as normative for Muslims on the basis of the teachings and practices of Muhammad and interpretations of the Koran
warpath - a course leading to warfare or battle
Translations
طَريقَة حَياه
livmåde at leve på
lífsmáti
spôsob života

way

(wei) noun
1. an opening or passageway. This is the way in/out; There's no way through.
2. a route, direction etc. Which way shall we go?; Which is the way to Princes Street?; His house is on the way from here to the school; Will you be able to find your/the way to my house?; Your house is on my way home; The errand took me out of my way; a motorway.
3. used in the names of roads. His address is 21 Melville Way.
4. a distance. It's a long way to the school; The nearest shops are only a short way away.
5. a method or manner. What is the easiest way to write a book?; I know a good way of doing it; He's got a funny way of talking; This is the quickest way to chop onions.
6. an aspect or side of something. In some ways this job is quite difficult; In a way I feel sorry for him.
7. a characteristic of behaviour; a habit. He has some rather unpleasant ways.
8. used with many verbs to give the idea of progressing or moving. He pushed his way through the crowd; They soon ate their way through the food.
adverb
(especially American) by a long distance or time; far. The winner finished the race way ahead of the other competitors; It's way past your bedtime.
ˈwayfarer noun
a traveller, especially on foot.
ˈwayside noun
the side of a road, path etc. We can stop by the wayside and have a picnic; (also adjective) a wayside inn.
be/get on one's way
to start or continue a walk, journey etc. Well, thanks for the cup of tea, but I must be on my way now.
by the way
incidentally, in passing, while I remember etc. By the way, did you know he was getting married?
fall by the wayside
(of projects, ideas etc) to be abandoned; to fail.
get/have one's own way
to do, get etc what one wants. You can't always have your own way.
get into / out of the way of (doing) something
to become accustomed to (not) doing; to get into / out of the habit of doing. They got into the way of waking up late when they were on holiday.
go out of one's way
to do more than is really necessary. He went out of his way to help us.
have a way with
to be good at dealing with or managing. She has a way with children.
have it one's own way
to get one's own way. Oh, have it your own way – I'm tired of arguing.
in a bad way
unwell; in poor condition. The patient is in a bad way.
in/out of the/someone's way
(not) blocking someone's progress, or occupying space that is needed by someone. Don't leave your bicycle where it will get in the way of pedestrians; Will I be in the/your way if I work at this table?; `Get out of my way!' he said rudely.
lose one's way
to stop knowing where one is, or in which direction one ought to be going. I lost my way through the city.
make one's way
1. to go. They made their way towards the centre of the town.
2. to get on in the world.
make way (for)
to stand aside and leave room (for). The crowd parted to make way for the ambulance.
under way
moving, in progress etc. Her plans are under way.
way of life
a manner of spending one's life. I enjoy farming – it's a pleasant way of life.
ways and means
methods, especially of providing money.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cooper claims, correctly in my view, that in the modern and contemporary philosophical traditions philosophy cannot be a way of life since these traditions do not share these assumptions (14-15).
With Pierre Hadot, Cooper explores the transformation of philosophy as a way of life into what it is today--a subject of theoretical study.
THE threat to Welsh beef farmers is the latest attack by supermarkets on the Welsh way of life.