wayfarer


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way·far·er

 (wā′fâr′ər)
n.
One who travels, especially on foot.

[Middle English weifarere : wei, way; see way + faren, to go on a journey (from Old English faran; see per- in Indo-European roots).]

wayfarer

(ˈweɪˌfɛərə)
n
a person who goes on a journey
ˈwayˌfaring n, adj

way•far•er

(ˈweɪˌfɛər ər)

n.
a traveler, esp. on foot.
[1400–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wayfarer - a pedestrian who walks from place to placewayfarer - a pedestrian who walks from place to place
pedestrian, footer, walker - a person who travels by foot
2.wayfarer - a traveler going on a trip
traveler, traveller - a person who changes location
pilgrim - someone who journeys in foreign lands

wayfarer

noun traveller, walker, trekker, wanderer, journeyer, gypsy, rover, voyager, nomad, itinerant, globetrotter, bird of passage 40,000 motels catering for weary wayfarers
Translations
عابِر السَّبيل
vejfarende
utasemberutazóvándor
ferîamaîur
yaya yolcu

wayfarer

(o.f.) [ˈweɪˌfɛərəʳ] Ncaminante mf, viajero/a m/f

wayfarer

[ˈweɪˌfɛərəʳ] n (old) → viandante m/f

way

(wei) noun
1. an opening or passageway. This is the way in/out; There's no way through.
2. a route, direction etc. Which way shall we go?; Which is the way to Princes Street?; His house is on the way from here to the school; Will you be able to find your/the way to my house?; Your house is on my way home; The errand took me out of my way; a motorway.
3. used in the names of roads. His address is 21 Melville Way.
4. a distance. It's a long way to the school; The nearest shops are only a short way away.
5. a method or manner. What is the easiest way to write a book?; I know a good way of doing it; He's got a funny way of talking; This is the quickest way to chop onions.
6. an aspect or side of something. In some ways this job is quite difficult; In a way I feel sorry for him.
7. a characteristic of behaviour; a habit. He has some rather unpleasant ways.
8. used with many verbs to give the idea of progressing or moving. He pushed his way through the crowd; They soon ate their way through the food.
adverb
(especially American) by a long distance or time; far. The winner finished the race way ahead of the other competitors; It's way past your bedtime.
ˈwayfarer noun
a traveller, especially on foot.
ˈwayside noun
the side of a road, path etc. We can stop by the wayside and have a picnic; (also adjective) a wayside inn.
be/get on one's way
to start or continue a walk, journey etc. Well, thanks for the cup of tea, but I must be on my way now.
by the way
incidentally, in passing, while I remember etc. By the way, did you know he was getting married?
fall by the wayside
(of projects, ideas etc) to be abandoned; to fail.
get/have one's own way
to do, get etc what one wants. You can't always have your own way.
get into / out of the way of (doing) something
to become accustomed to (not) doing; to get into / out of the habit of doing. They got into the way of waking up late when they were on holiday.
go out of one's way
to do more than is really necessary. He went out of his way to help us.
have a way with
to be good at dealing with or managing. She has a way with children.
have it one's own way
to get one's own way. Oh, have it your own way – I'm tired of arguing.
in a bad way
unwell; in poor condition. The patient is in a bad way.
in/out of the/someone's way
(not) blocking someone's progress, or occupying space that is needed by someone. Don't leave your bicycle where it will get in the way of pedestrians; Will I be in the/your way if I work at this table?; `Get out of my way!' he said rudely.
lose one's way
to stop knowing where one is, or in which direction one ought to be going. I lost my way through the city.
make one's way
1. to go. They made their way towards the centre of the town.
2. to get on in the world.
make way (for)
to stand aside and leave room (for). The crowd parted to make way for the ambulance.
under way
moving, in progress etc. Her plans are under way.
way of life
a manner of spending one's life. I enjoy farming – it's a pleasant way of life.
ways and means
methods, especially of providing money.
References in classic literature ?
He was buried at dead of night in his own cathedral and laid by Stella's side, and over his grave were carved words chosen by himself which told the wayfarer that Jonathan Swift had gone "Where savage indignation can no longer tear at his heart.
Burch prayed for grandfather, and called him a man of God, and thanked our Heavenly Father that his spirit was still alive in his descendants (that was you), and that the good old house where so many of the brethren had been cheered and helped, and from which so many had gone out strengthened for the fight, was still hospitably open for the stranger and wayfarer.
The wayfarer smoked his pipe out, put it in his breast, slipped off his great wooden shoes, and lay down on his back on the heap of stones.
What mean ye by running thus over a wayfarer, rough shod?
As if planted on purpose for him, there soon appeared a little tuft of maples, with a delightful recess in the midst, and such a fresh bubbling spring that it seemed never to have sparkled for any wayfarer but David Swan.
I have said good-by to him myself, and all that I hope is that next time you offer a wayfarer the hospitality of St.
A little way past the inn we came upon a notice-board whereon the lord of the manor warned all wayfarers against trespassing on the common by making encampments, lighting fires or cutting firewood thereon, and to this fortunate circumstance I owe the most interesting story my companion had to tell.
Yet from time to time Alleyne met other wayfarers, and more than once was overtaken by strings of pack mules and horsemen journeying in the same direction as himself.
As the two wayfarers came within the precincts of the town, the children of the Puritans looked up from their player what passed for play with those sombre little urchins -- and spoke gravely one to another
I will warrant you against dying of old age, however,'' said the Templar, who now recognised his friend of the forest; ``I will assure you from all deaths but a violent one, if you give such directions to wayfarers, as you did this night to the Prior and me.
To avoid meeting any possible wayfarers he left the high road, and took a footpath under some fir-trees.
The afternoon was already growing dark when the two other wayfarers, Mary and Ralph Denham, came out on the high road beyond the outskirts of Lincoln.