ways


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way

 (wā)
n.
1.
a. A road, path, or highway affording passage from one place to another.
b. An opening affording passage: This door is the only way into the attic.
2.
a. Space to proceed: cleared the way for the parade.
b. Opportunity to advance: opened the way to peace.
3.
a. A course that is or may be used in going from one place to another: tried to find the shortest way home.
b. Progress or travel along a certain route or in a specific direction: on her way north.
c. often ways (Used with a sing. verb) Informal Distance: The travelers have come a long way. That village is a good ways off.
4.
a. A course of conduct or action: tried to take the easy way out of the mess he was in.
b. A manner or method of doing something: several ways of solving this problem; had no way to reach her. See Synonyms at method.
c. Used with a personal pronoun as the object of various verbs to indicate progress toward an objective: elbowed his way through the crowd; talked my way into the club; worked his way into a better job.
d. A usual or habitual manner or mode of being, living, or acting: the American way of life.
e. An individual or personal manner of behaving, acting, or doing: Have it your own way.
5.
a. A specific direction: He glanced my way.
b. A participant. Often used in combination: a three-way conversation.
6.
a. An aspect, particular, or feature: resembles his father in many ways; in no way comparable.
b. Nature or category: not much in the way of a plot.
7. Freedom to do as one wishes: if I had my way.
8. An aptitude or facility: She certainly does have a way with words.
9. A state or condition: He is in a bad way financially.
10. Vicinity: Drop in when you're out our way.
11. often ways A longitudinal strip on a surface that serves to guide a moving machine part.
12. ways (used with a sing. or pl. verb) Nautical The structure on which a ship is built and from which it slides when launched.
adv.
1. Informal By a great distance or to a great degree; far: way off base; way too expensive.
2. Slang Very; extremely: "Can they really make a car that's way cool?" (Fortune).
3. Informal From this place; away: Go way.
4. Informal Used in response to no way to indicate affirmation contradicting a negative assertion.
Idioms:
all the way
From beginning to end; completely: drove all the way from Detroit to Pittsburgh.
by the way
Incidentally: By the way, you forgot to cash that check.
by way of
1. Through; via: flew to the Far East by way of the polar route.
2. As a means of: made no comment by way of apology.
go out of (one's)/the way
To inconvenience oneself in doing something beyond what is required.
in a way
1. To a certain extent; with reservations: I like the new styles, in a way.
2. From one point of view: In a way, you're right.
in the way
In a position to obstruct, hinder, or interfere.
no way Informal
Certainly not: Did you like that movie?—No way! It was boring.
on (one's)/the way
In the process of coming, going, or traveling: She is on her way out the door. Winter is on the way.
on the way
On the route of a journey: met him on the way to town; ran into them on the way.
out of the way
1. In such a position as not to obstruct, hinder, or interfere.
2. Taken care of; disposed of: some details to get out of the way first.
3. In a remote location.
4. Of an unusual character; remarkable.
5. Improper; amiss: said nothing out of the way.
the way
In the manner that: The way he talks, you'd think he ran the company.
under way
1. In motion or operation.
2. In ongoing development; in progress.

[Middle English, from Old English weg; see wegh- in Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: Way has long been an intensifying adverb meaning "to a great degree," as in way over budget. This usage is both acceptable and common but has an informal ring. Way is also used as a general intensifier, as in way cool and way depressing. This usage remains a hallmark of casual speech and is not appropriate for formal contexts. · In American English ways is often used as an equivalent of way in phrases such as a long ways to go. This usage is considered nonstandard by most editors, though it appears occasionally in less formal texts.

ways

(weɪz)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
[Middle English weyes, Old English weges, genitive singular of weg way1]

-ways

a suffix appearing in adverbs: always; sideways.
[Middle English]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ways - structure consisting of a sloping way down to the water from the place where ships are built or repaired
shipyard - a workplace where ships are built or repaired
structure, construction - a thing constructed; a complex entity constructed of many parts; "the structure consisted of a series of arches"; "she wore her hair in an amazing construction of whirls and ribbons"
References in classic literature ?
I I like your nice manners and refined ways of speaking, when you don't try to be elegant.
A great restlessness was in her and it expressed itself in two ways.
We can go in two ways, and perhaps we shall find it to our advantage to use both means," said Professor Bumper.
There may have been--there must have been--influences, both subtle and apparent, working in their several ways to induce her to do this; but the most obvious was the influence of Adele Ratignolle.
I am not a prejudiced man, nor one who vaunts himself on his natural privileges, though the worst enemy I have on earth, and he is an Iroquois, daren't deny that I am genuine white," the scout replied, surveying, with secret satisfaction, the faded color of his bony and sinewy hand, "and I am willing to own that my people have many ways, of which, as an honest man, I can't approve.
It is a big, airy room, the whole floor nearly, with windows that look all ways, and air and sunshine galore.
There, again, she has upset a tumbler of marbles, all of which roll different ways, and each individual marble, devil-directed, into the most difficult obscurity that it can find.
The age had not so much refinement, that any sense of impropriety restrained the wearers of petticoat and farthingale from stepping forth into the public ways, and wedging their not unsubstantial persons, if occasion were, into the throng nearest to the scaffold at an execution.
That all this might not be too onerous on the purses of his rustic patrons, who are apt to considered the costs of schooling a grievous burden, and schoolmasters as mere drones he had various ways of rendering himself both useful and agreeable.
While in various silent ways the seamen of the Pequod were evincing their observance of this ominous incident at the first mere mention of the White Whale's name to another ship, Ahab for a moment paused; it almost seemed as though he would have lowered a boat to board the stranger, had not the threatening wind forbade.
I liked the old ways best, but I was getting so I liked the new ones, too, a little bit.
In several ways his opinions were totally changed, and would never go back to what they were before, but the main structure of his character was not changed, and could not be changed.