wayward


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

way·ward

 (wā′wərd)
adj.
1. Deviating from what is desired, expected, or required, especially in being disobedient or in gratifying one's own inclinations: "a teacher taking pains with a wayward but promising child" (George Orwell).
2. Difficult or impossible to manage, control, or keep in order: a wayward strand of hair.
3. Going somewhere not intended or desired: a wayward golf shot; a wayward courier.
4. Following no clear pattern; unpredictable: "events that were often thought to be wayward, capricious, and inexplicable" (Marq de Villiers).

[Middle English, short for awaiward, turned away, perverse : awai, away; see away + -ward, -ward.]

way′ward·ly adv.
way′ward·ness n.

wayward

(ˈweɪwəd)
adj
1. wanting to have one's own way regardless of the wishes or good of others
2. capricious, erratic, or unpredictable
[C14: changed from awayward turned or turning away]
ˈwaywardly adv
ˈwaywardness n

way•ward

(ˈweɪ wərd)

adj.
1. disregarding or rejecting what is right or proper; willful; disobedient.
2. prompted by caprice; capricious: a wayward impulse.
3. changing unpredictably; erratic: a wayward breeze.
[1350–1400; Middle English; aph. variant of awayward. See away, -ward]
way′ward•ly, adv.
way′ward•ness, n.
syn: See willful.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.wayward - resistant to guidance or discipline; "Mary Mary quite contrary"; "an obstinate child with a violent temper"; "a perverse mood"; "wayward behavior"
disobedient - not obeying or complying with commands of those in authority; "disobedient children"

wayward

wayward

adjective
Given to acting in opposition to others:
Translations
عاصٍ، صَعْب المِراس، مُتَمَرِّد
egenrådiguberegnelig
akaratos
einòykkur, òrjóskur, ódæll
neklusnus
ietiepīgskaprīzs
dik başlıisyankâr

wayward

[ˈweɪwəd] ADJ
1. (= wilful) [person] → rebelde; [behaviour] → díscolo, rebelde; [horse] → caprichoso, rebelde
she separated from her wayward husbandse separó del rebelde de su marido
2. (gen hum) (= unmanageable) [hair] → rebelde; [satellite, missile] → rebelde, incontrolable

wayward

[ˈweɪwərd] adjcapricieux/euse, entêté(e)

wayward

adj (= self-willed) child, horse, dispositioneigenwillig, eigensinnig; (= capricious) fancy, request, passionabwegig; (liter) stream, breezeunberechenbar, launisch (liter); their wayward sonihr ungeratener Sohn

wayward

[ˈweɪwəd] adj (self-willed) → ribelle, capriccioso/a

wayward

(ˈweiwəd) adjective
(of a child etc) self-willed and rebellious.
References in classic literature ?
Cora was seated nigh them, a calm and amused looker-on; regarding the wayward movements of her more youthful sister with that species of maternal fondness which characterized her love for Alice.
Dear Clifford," said Hepzibah, in the tone with which one soothes a wayward infant, "this is our cousin Phoebe,--little Phoebe Pyncheon,--Arthur's only child, you know.
That odd sort of wayward mood I am speaking of, comes over a man only in some time of extreme tribulation; it comes in the very midst of his earnestness, so that what just before might have seemed to him a thing most momentous, now seems but a part of the general joke.
It is as if heaven had an especial band of angels, whose office it was to sojourn for a season here, and endear to them the wayward human heart, that they might bear it upward with them in their homeward flight.
yet are they clearly wholesome, the more espe- cially when one doth assuage the asperities of their nature by admixture of the tranquilizing juice of the wayward cabbage --"
He took to Heathcliff strangely, believing all he said (for that matter, he said precious little, and generally the truth), and petting him up far above Cathy, who was too mischievous and wayward for a favourite.
Moreover, she was rather what might be called wayward - I'll go so far as to say what I should call wayward myself,' said Mr.
For, if you reflect a moment, you will see that, while it is easy to choose what virtues we would have our wife possess, it is all but impossible to imagine those faults we would desire in her, which I think most lovers would admit add piquancy to the loved one, that fascinating wayward imperfection which paradoxically makes her perfect.
At a given moment in his wayward progress, an icy draft struck him in the face.
Let him who calls me wild beast and basilisk, leave me alone as something noxious and evil; let him who calls me ungrateful, withhold his service; who calls me wayward, seek not my acquaintance; who calls me cruel, pursue me not; for this wild beast, this basilisk, this ungrateful, cruel, wayward being has no kind of desire to seek, serve, know, or follow them.
It may appear strange that Alice Vane should have been there at such a time; but there was something so childlike, so wayward, in her singular character, so apart from ordinary rules, that her presence did not surprise the few who noticed it.
His wife and daughter saw the dismal pageant from a distance, and alarmed the neighborhood with their cries; they thought the poor man had suddenly settled the great debt of nature in one of his wayward moods.