weal


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Related to weal: public weal

weal 1

 (wēl)
n.
1. Prosperity; happiness: in weal and woe.
2. The welfare of the community; the general good: the public weal.

[Middle English wele, from Old English wela; see wel- in Indo-European roots.]

weal 2

 (wēl)
n.
A ridge on the flesh raised by a blow; a welt.

[Alteration (influenced by wheal) of wale.]

weal

(wiːl)
n
(Pathology) a raised mark on the surface of the body produced by a blow. Also called: wale, welt or wheal
[C19: variant of wale1, influenced in form by wheal]

weal

(wiːl)
n
1. archaic prosperity or wellbeing (now esp in the phrases the public weal, the common weal)
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) obsolete the state
3. (Banking & Finance) obsolete wealth
[Old English wela; related to Old Saxon welo, Old High German wolo]

weal1

(wil)

n.
1. well-being, prosperity, or happiness: the public weal.
2. Obs. wealth or riches.
3. Obs. the body politic; the state.
[before 900; Middle English wele, Old English wela; akin to well1]

weal2

(wil)

n.
[variant of wale, with ea of wheal]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.weal - a raised mark on the skin (as produced by the blow of a whip); characteristic of many allergic reactions
harm, hurt, injury, trauma - any physical damage to the body caused by violence or accident or fracture etc.

weal

noun mark, scar, welt, ridge, streak, stripe, wheal, wale, contusion the red weals left across his chest by the whip

weal 1

noun
A state of health, happiness, and prospering:

weal 2

noun
A ridge or bump raised on the flesh, as by a lash or blow:
Translations

weal

1 [wiːl] N (esp Brit) (= wound) → verdugón m

weal

2 (archaic) [wiːl] N (= well-being) → bienestar m
the common wealel bien común

weal

[ˈwiːl] n (British) (= welt) → marque f

weal

1
n (liter)Wohl nt; the common/public wealdas allgemeine/öffentliche Wohl, das Allgemeinwohl; weal and woeWohl und Wehe nt

weal

2
n (= welt)Striemen m

weal

[wiːl] n (welt) → piaga
References in classic literature ?
Wery good thing is weal pie, when you know the lady as made it, and is quite sure it ain't kittens; and arter all though, where's the odds, when they're so like weal that the wery piemen themselves don't know the difference?
They're all made o' them noble animals," says he, a-pointin' to a wery nice little tabby kitten, "and I seasons 'em for beefsteak, weal or kidney, 'cording to the demand.
I TAKE goodness in this sense, the affecting of the weal of men, which is that the Grecians call philanthropia; and the word humanity (as it is used) is a little too light to express it.
So man's insanity is heaven's sense; and wandering from all mortal reason, man comes at last to that celestial thought, which, to reason, is absurd and frantic; and weal or woe, feels then uncompromised, indifferent as his God.
The scheme of separate confederacies, which will always nultiply the chances of ambition, will be a never failing bait to all such influential characters in the State administrations as are capable of preferring their own emolument and advancement to the public weal.
Shall I, or shall I not (come weal, come woe) take myself off?
Our difference of opinion amounts to this, that you make the mainspring self-interest, while I suppose that interest in the common weal is bound to exist in every man of a certain degree of advancement.
The old woman took kindly to the blits; they enchant Dulcinea, and whip me in order to disenchant her; Altisidora dies of ailments God was pleased to send her, and to bring her to life again they must give me four-and-twenty smacks, and prick holes in my body with pins, and raise weals on my arms with pinches
To judge from the weals which he counted, their number, he said, amounted to forty-one; but at last, in order, as he declared, not to be less generous than his Highness the Stadtholder, he consented to make his peace.
Think tank Common Weal has suggested that an independent Scotland should have its own central bank, which would create hundreds of jobs and pay for itself within a few years.
Common Weal put forward a six-point plan to reinvigorate the SNP Government, including scrapping their proposal to cut air passenger duty and reinvesting the cash in childcare.
It looked like the period would end with a tie score, but Weal took advantage of a turnover by Taylor Doherty deep in the Worcester end.