weal


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Related to weal: public weal

weal 1

 (wēl)
n.
1. Prosperity; happiness: in weal and woe.
2. The welfare of the community; the general good: the public weal.

[Middle English wele, from Old English wela; see wel- in Indo-European roots.]

weal 2

 (wēl)
n.
A ridge on the flesh raised by a blow; a welt.

[Alteration (influenced by wheal) of wale.]

weal

(wiːl)
n
(Pathology) a raised mark on the surface of the body produced by a blow. Also called: wale, welt or wheal
[C19: variant of wale1, influenced in form by wheal]

weal

(wiːl)
n
1. archaic prosperity or wellbeing (now esp in the phrases the public weal, the common weal)
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) obsolete the state
3. (Banking & Finance) obsolete wealth
[Old English wela; related to Old Saxon welo, Old High German wolo]

weal1

(wil)

n.
1. well-being, prosperity, or happiness: the public weal.
2. Obs. wealth or riches.
3. Obs. the body politic; the state.
[before 900; Middle English wele, Old English wela; akin to well1]

weal2

(wil)

n.
[variant of wale, with ea of wheal]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.weal - a raised mark on the skin (as produced by the blow of a whip); characteristic of many allergic reactions
harm, hurt, injury, trauma - any physical damage to the body caused by violence or accident or fracture etc.

weal

noun mark, scar, welt, ridge, streak, stripe, wheal, wale, contusion the red weals left across his chest by the whip

weal 1

noun
A state of health, happiness, and prospering:

weal 2

noun
A ridge or bump raised on the flesh, as by a lash or blow:
Translations

weal

1 [wiːl] N (esp Brit) (= wound) → verdugón m

weal

2 (archaic) [wiːl] N (= well-being) → bienestar m
the common wealel bien común

weal

[ˈwiːl] n (British) (= welt) → marque f

weal

1
n (liter)Wohl nt; the common/public wealdas allgemeine/öffentliche Wohl, das Allgemeinwohl; weal and woeWohl und Wehe nt

weal

2
n (= welt)Striemen m

weal

[wiːl] n (welt) → piaga
References in classic literature ?
Four little chests all in a row, Dim with dust, and worn by time, Four women, taught by weal and woe To love and labor in their prime.
So man's insanity is heaven's sense; and wandering from all mortal reason, man comes at last to that celestial thought, which, to reason, is absurd and frantic; and weal or woe, feels then uncompromised, indifferent as his God.
In the one case a man lies dead-alive four genera- tions -- mummified in ignorance and sloth -- and that qualifies him to command live people, and take their weal and woe into his impotent hands; and in the other case, a man lies bedded with death and worms four generations, and that qualifies him for office in the celestial camp.
Then come what will of weal or woe (Since all gold hath alloy), Thou 'lt bloom unwithered in this heart, My Rose of Joy!
Young gentlemen is generally tired of beef and mutton: have a weal cutlet
Be strong, live happie, and love, but first of all Him whom to love is to obey, and keep His great command; take heed least Passion sway Thy Judgement to do aught, which else free Will Would not admit; thine and of all thy Sons The weal or woe in thee is plac't; beware.
Remain at home, then, ungrateful lady,'' answered Cedric; ``thine is the hard heart, which can sacrifice the weal of an oppressed people to an idle and unauthorized attachment.
But they thought the want of moral virtues was so far from being supplied by superior endowments of the mind, that employments could never be put into such dangerous hands as those of persons so qualified; and, at least, that the mistakes committed by ignorance, in a virtuous disposition, would never be of such fatal consequence to the public weal, as the practices of a man, whose inclinations led him to be corrupt, and who had great abilities to manage, to multiply, and defend his corruptions.
This simple proposition will teach us how little reason there is to expect, that the persons intrusted with the administration of the affairs of the particular members of a confederacy will at all times be ready, with perfect good-humor, and an unbiased regard to the public weal, to execute the resolutions or decrees of the general authority.
It swept across the river to Shepperton, and the water in its track rose in a boiling weal crested with steam.
Mother," answered Telemachus, "let the bard sing what he has a mind to; bards do not make the ills they sing of; it is Jove, not they, who makes them, and who sends weal or woe upon mankind according to his own good pleasure.
Shall I, or shall I not (come weal, come woe) take myself off?