weald


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weald

 (wēld)
n. Chiefly British
1. A woodland.
2. An area of open rolling upland.

[From Weald, a once-forested area in southeast England, from Old English wald, weald, forest.]

weald

(wiːld)
n
(Physical Geography) archaic Brit open or forested country
[Old English; related to Old Saxon, Old High German wald, Old Norse vollr, probably related to wild]

Weald

(wiːld)
n
(Placename) the Weald a region of SE England, in Kent, Surrey, and East and West Sussex between the North Downs and the South Downs: formerly forested

weald

(wild)

n.
wooded or uncultivated country.
[before 1150; Middle English weeld, Old English (West Saxon) weald forest; see wold1]

Weald

(wild)

n.
The, a region in SE England, in Kent, Surrey, and Essex counties: once a forest area; now an agricultural region.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.weald - an area of open or forested country
rural area, country - an area outside of cities and towns; "his poetry celebrated the slower pace of life in the country"
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
References in classic literature ?
About five miles from Dorking, looking over the Weald.
Soon he got up again and stared for a long time it the sinking world below, at white cliffs to the east and flattening marsh to the left, at a minute wide prospect of weald and downland, at dim towns and harbours and rivers and ribbon-like roads, at ships and ships, decks and foreshortened funnels upon the ever-widening sea, and at the great mono-rail bridge that straddled the Channel from Folkestone to Boulogne, until at last, first little wisps and then a veil of filmy cloud hid the prospect from his eyes.
Challenger's house was on the very edge of the hill, and from its southern face, in which was the study window, one looked across the vast stretch of the weald to where the gentle curves of the South Downs formed an undulating horizon.
William Caxton, as he himself tells us, was born in Kent in the Weald.
For in France was I never, and was born and learned my English in Kent, in the Weald, where I doubt not is spoken as broad and rude English as in any place in England.
Though it must be admitted that the denudation of the Weald has been a mere trifle, in comparison with that which has removed masses of our palaeozoic strata, in parts ten thousand feet in thickness, as shown in Prof.
The light-witted birds of the air, the beasts of the weald and the wood
These woods are locally supposed to be the extreme fringe of the great Weald forest, which thins away until it reaches the northern chalk downs.
Further afield are the rolling green fields of the Kentish Weald.
Contract Awarded to Build a new school at Alconbury Weald.
Landscapes in the Brecon Beacons National Park and High Weald, North Wessex Downs and Tamar Valley AONBs were not prioritised for a share of the PS500m allowance made available by regulator Ofgem up to 2021.
993 billion barrels has been independently calculated by Schlumberger to lie within the 55 square miles of the PEDL137 and PEDL246 Horse Hill licences ("the Licence Area") in the Weald Basin, located in the South East of England.