wealthy man


Also found in: Thesaurus.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wealthy man - a man who is wealthywealthy man - a man who is wealthy      
nabob - a wealthy man (especially one who made his fortune in the Orient)
have, rich person, wealthy person - a person who possesses great material wealth
nob, toff - informal term for an upper-class or wealthy person
References in classic literature ?
Not envious, let us say, since he has talent; but it annoys him that a wealthy man of the highest society, and a count, too (you know they all detest a title), can, without any particular trouble, do as well, if not better, than he who has devoted all his life to it.
That light is the dower you brought him, and he is a wealthy man if it does not flicker.
The justice of the peace died just as our second prosperous epoch began, and luckily for us, his successor had formerly been a notary in Grenoble who had lost most of his fortune by a bad speculation, though enough of it yet remained to cause him to be looked upon in the village as a wealthy man.
which would have ruined a wealthy man, and which became impossible, utter madness even, for a man so poor as he was.
All that I had heard and seen, and a great part of what he had said himself, led me to suppose that he was a wealthy man.
He is a very wealthy man," continued Marguerite; "the wealthiest, it may be.
I remember her aunt very well, Biddy Henshawe; she married a very wealthy man.
Everywhere there were mingled the luxury of the wealthy man of taste and the careless untidiness of the bachelor.
Rumour reported that Drebber had managed to convert a large part of his property into money, and that he had departed a wealthy man, while his companion, Stangerson, was comparatively poor.
Shuttleworthy was one of the most respectable and, undoubtedly, he was the most wealthy man in Rattleborough, while "Old Charley Goodfellow" was upon as intimate terms with him as if he had been his own brother.
I understood very well why, when he told me that he had joined in the Clyde a small steamer chartered by a relative of his, "a very wealthy man," he observed (probably Lord X, I thought), to carry arms and other supplies to the Carlist army.
It is asking much of a wealthy man to come down and bury himself in a place of this kind, but I need not tell you that it means a very great deal to the countryside.