wear down


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Related to wear down: wear off, wear out, stick to, bumped into

wear

 (wâr)
v. wore (wôr), worn (wôrn), wear·ing, wears
v.tr.
1. To carry or have on one's person as covering, adornment, or protection: wearing a jacket; must wear a seat belt.
2. To carry or have habitually on one's person, especially as an aid: wears glasses.
3. To display in one's appearance: always wears a smile.
4. To bear, carry, or maintain in a particular manner: wears her hair long.
5. To fly or display (colors). Used of a ship, jockey, or knight.
6. To damage, diminish, erode, or consume by long or hard use, attrition, or exposure. Often used with away, down, or off: rocks worn away by the sea; shoes worn down at the heels.
7. To produce by constant use, attrition, or exposure: eventually wore hollows in the stone steps.
8. To bring to a specified condition by long use or attrition: wore the clothes to rags; pebbles worn smooth.
9. To fatigue, weary, or exhaust: Your incessant criticism has worn my patience.
10. Nautical To make (a sailing ship) come about with the wind aft.
v.intr.
1.
a. To last under continual or hard use: a fabric that will wear.
b. To last through the passage of time: a friendship that wears well.
2. To break down or diminish through use or attrition: The rear tires began to wear.
3. To pass gradually or tediously: The hours wore on.
4. Nautical To come about with stern to windward.
n.
1. The act of wearing or the state of being worn; use: This shirt is ideal for wear in sultry climates.
2. Clothing, especially of a particular kind or for a particular use. Often used in combination: rainwear; footwear.
3. Damage resulting from use or age: The rug shows plenty of wear.
4. The ability to withstand impairment from use or attrition: The engine has plenty of wear left.
Phrasal Verbs:
wear down
To break down or exhaust by relentless pressure or resistance: The child's pleading finally wore her parents down.
wear off
To diminish gradually in effect: The drug wore off.
wear out
1. To make or become unusable through long or heavy use: wore out a pair of hockey skates; a vacuum that finally wore out.
2. To exhaust; tire: Raking the leaves wore me out.
3. To use up or consume gradually: His complaining finally wore out my patience.
Idioms:
wear the pants/trousers Informal
To exercise controlling authority in a household.
wear thin
1. To be weakened or eroded gradually: Her patience is wearing thin.
2. To become less convincing, acceptable, or popular, as through repeated use: excuses that are wearing thin.

[Middle English weren, from Old English werian; see wes- in Indo-European roots.]

wear′er n.

wear down

vb (adverb)
1. to consume or be consumed by long or constant wearing, rubbing, etc
2. to overcome or be overcome gradually by persistent effort
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.wear down - exhaust or get tired through overuse or great strain or stresswear down - exhaust or get tired through overuse or great strain or stress; "We wore ourselves out on this hike"
indispose - cause to feel unwell; "She was indisposed"
exhaust, tucker, tucker out, wash up, beat - wear out completely; "This kind of work exhausts me"; "I'm beat"; "He was all washed up after the exam"
overfatigue, overtire, overweary - tire excessively
2.wear down - deteriorate through use or stresswear down - deteriorate through use or stress; "The constant friction wore out the cloth"
deteriorate - become worse or disintegrate; "His mind deteriorated"
ablate - wear away through erosion or vaporization
scuff - get or become scuffed; "These patent leather shoes scuffed"

wear

verb
1. To consume gradually, as by chemical reaction or friction:
2. To diminish the strength and energy of:
phrasal verb
wear away
To consume gradually, as by chemical reaction or friction:
phrasal verb
wear down
To diminish the strength and energy of:
phrasal verb
wear out
1. To make extremely tired:
Informal: knock out, tucker (out).
Slang: do in, poop (out).
Idioms: run ragged, take it out of.
2. To diminish the strength and energy of:
Translations

w>wear down

vt sep
(= reduce by friction)abnutzen; heelablaufen, abtreten; tyre treadabfahren; lipstickverbrauchen; pencilverschreiben
(fig) opposition, strength etczermürben; person (= make more amenable)mürbe- or weichmachen (inf); (= tire out, depress)fix und fertig machen (inf)
visich abnutzen; (heels)sich ablaufen or abtreten; (tyre tread)sich abfahren; (lipstick etc)sich verbrauchen; (pencil)sich verschreiben
References in classic literature ?
Joe's task was to wear down that strength, not with one blow, nor ten, but with blow after blow, without end, until that enormous strength should be beaten sheer out of its body.
In tricks and skill and experience he was the master, and though he could land nothing vital, he proceeded scientifically to chop and wear down his opponent.
He would jump up to rush on deck and tramp, tramp up and down that poop till he felt ready to drop, without being able to wear down the agitation of his soul, generous indeed, but weighted by its envelope of blood and muscle and bone; handicapped by the brain creating precise images and everlastingly speculating, speculating--looking out for signs, watching for symptoms.
And the key is that when you get in you've got to stay in and wear down the opposition.
Named to the magazine's annual Best of What's New list in the Automotive category, the revolutionary MICHELIN Premier A/S tire with EverGrip(TM) features an evolving tread design and high-traction rubber compound to deliver exceptional levels of wet grip providing enhanced safety even as the tires wear down.
EAST LOS ANGELES -- Banning of Wilmington tried to wear down the Sylmar girls' soccer team with its physical play.