wear out


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wear

 (wâr)
v. wore (wôr), worn (wôrn), wear·ing, wears
v.tr.
1. To carry or have on one's person as covering, adornment, or protection: wearing a jacket; must wear a seat belt.
2. To carry or have habitually on one's person, especially as an aid: wears glasses.
3. To display in one's appearance: always wears a smile.
4. To bear, carry, or maintain in a particular manner: wears her hair long.
5. To fly or display (colors). Used of a ship, jockey, or knight.
6. To damage, diminish, erode, or consume by long or hard use, attrition, or exposure. Often used with away, down, or off: rocks worn away by the sea; shoes worn down at the heels.
7. To produce by constant use, attrition, or exposure: eventually wore hollows in the stone steps.
8. To bring to a specified condition by long use or attrition: wore the clothes to rags; pebbles worn smooth.
9. To fatigue, weary, or exhaust: Your incessant criticism has worn my patience.
10. Nautical To make (a sailing ship) come about with the wind aft.
v.intr.
1.
a. To last under continual or hard use: a fabric that will wear.
b. To last through the passage of time: a friendship that wears well.
2. To break down or diminish through use or attrition: The rear tires began to wear.
3. To pass gradually or tediously: The hours wore on.
4. Nautical To come about with stern to windward.
n.
1. The act of wearing or the state of being worn; use: This shirt is ideal for wear in sultry climates.
2. Clothing, especially of a particular kind or for a particular use. Often used in combination: rainwear; footwear.
3. Damage resulting from use or age: The rug shows plenty of wear.
4. The ability to withstand impairment from use or attrition: The engine has plenty of wear left.
Phrasal Verbs:
wear down
To break down or exhaust by relentless pressure or resistance: The child's pleading finally wore her parents down.
wear off
To diminish gradually in effect: The drug wore off.
wear out
1. To make or become unusable through long or heavy use: wore out a pair of hockey skates; a vacuum that finally wore out.
2. To exhaust; tire: Raking the leaves wore me out.
3. To use up or consume gradually: His complaining finally wore out my patience.
Idioms:
wear the pants/trousers Informal
To exercise controlling authority in a household.
wear thin
1. To be weakened or eroded gradually: Her patience is wearing thin.
2. To become less convincing, acceptable, or popular, as through repeated use: excuses that are wearing thin.

[Middle English weren, from Old English werian; see wes- in Indo-European roots.]

wear′er n.

wear out

vb (adverb)
1. to make or become unfit or useless through wear
2. (tr) to exhaust or tire
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.wear out - exhaust or get tired through overuse or great strain or stresswear out - exhaust or get tired through overuse or great strain or stress; "We wore ourselves out on this hike"
indispose - cause to feel unwell; "She was indisposed"
exhaust, tucker, tucker out, wash up, beat - wear out completely; "This kind of work exhausts me"; "I'm beat"; "He was all washed up after the exam"
overfatigue, overtire, overweary - tire excessively
2.wear out - go to pieces; "The lawn mower finally broke"; "The gears wore out"; "The old chair finally fell apart completely"
decay, dilapidate, crumble - fall into decay or ruin; "The unoccupied house started to decay"
fray, frazzle - wear away by rubbing; "The friction frayed the sleeve"
bust, break - ruin completely; "He busted my radio!"
3.wear out - deteriorate through use or stresswear out - deteriorate through use or stress; "The constant friction wore out the cloth"
deteriorate - become worse or disintegrate; "His mind deteriorated"
ablate - wear away through erosion or vaporization
scuff - get or become scuffed; "These patent leather shoes scuffed"

wear

verb
1. To consume gradually, as by chemical reaction or friction:
2. To diminish the strength and energy of:
phrasal verb
wear away
To consume gradually, as by chemical reaction or friction:
phrasal verb
wear down
To diminish the strength and energy of:
phrasal verb
wear out
1. To make extremely tired:
Informal: knock out, tucker (out).
Slang: do in, poop (out).
Idioms: run ragged, take it out of.
2. To diminish the strength and energy of:
Translations
يَبْلى، يَصْبِحُ غَيْر مُلائِم للإرتِداء
elkopik
gatslíta
obnosiť
eskimekyıpranmak

w>wear out

vt sep
(lit)kaputt machen; carpetabtreten; clothes, shoeskaputt tragen; record, machineryabnutzen
(fig: = exhaust) (physically) → erschöpfen, erledigen (inf); (mentally) → fertigmachen (inf); to be worn outerschöpft or erledigt sein; (mentally) → am Ende sein (inf); to wear oneself outsich überanstrengen, sich kaputtmachen (inf)
vikaputtgehen; (clothes, curtains, carpets)verschleißen; his patience has worn out/is rapidly wearing outseine Geduld ist erschöpft or am Ende/erschöpft sich zusehends

wear

(weə) past tense wore (woː) ; past participle worn (woːn) verb
1. to be dressed in or carry on (a part of) the body. She wore a white dress; Does she usually wear spectacles?
2. to arrange (one's hair) in a particular way. She wears her hair in a pony-tail.
3. to have or show (a particular expression). She wore an angry expression.
4. to (cause to) become thinner etc because of use, rubbing etc. This carpet has worn in several places; This sweater is wearing thin at the elbows.
5. to make (a bare patch, a hole etc) by rubbing, use etc. I've worn a hole in the elbow of my jacket.
6. to stand up to use. This material doesn't wear very well.
noun
1. use as clothes etc. I use this suit for everyday wear; Those shoes won't stand much wear.
2. articles for use as clothes. casual wear; sportswear; leisure wear.
3. (sometimes wear and tear) damage due to use. The hall carpet is showing signs of wear.
4. ability to withstand use. There's plenty of wear left in it yet.
ˈwearable adjective
(negative unwearable) fit to be worn. My only wearable coat is at the cleaners.
ˈwearer noun
a dress that makes the wearer feel elegant.
ˈwearing adjective
exhausting. I've had rather a wearing day.
worn (woːn) adjective
damaged as a result of use. a badly-worn carpet.
wear away
to make or become damaged, thinner, smoother etc through use, rubbing etc. The steps have (been) worn away in places.
wear off
to become less. The pain is wearing off.
wear out
to (cause to) become unfit for further use. My socks have worn out; I've worn out my socks.
worn out
1. so damaged by use as to be unfit for further use. These shoes are worn out; a worn-out sweater.
2. very tired. His wife is worn out after looking after the children.
References in classic literature ?
Do not reason about it, my philosphical reader, and say that Hetty, being very pretty, must have known that it did not signify whether she had on any ornaments or not; and that, moreover, to look at ear- rings which she could not possibly wear out of her bedroom could hardly be a satisfaction, the essence of vanity being a reference to the impressions produced on others; you will never understand women's natures if you are so excessively rational.
They would be just the thing to take a long walk in, for they could not wear out.
For example, a programmable power key allows consumers to turn all their equipment on and off with the press of one button, and the remote's "non-volatile memory" guarantees that device codes are never lost when batteries are removed or wear out.