wear thin


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Related to wear thin: worn thin

wear

 (wâr)
v. wore (wôr), worn (wôrn), wear·ing, wears
v.tr.
1. To carry or have on one's person as covering, adornment, or protection: wearing a jacket; must wear a seat belt.
2. To carry or have habitually on one's person, especially as an aid: wears glasses.
3. To display in one's appearance: always wears a smile.
4. To bear, carry, or maintain in a particular manner: wears her hair long.
5. To fly or display (colors). Used of a ship, jockey, or knight.
6. To damage, diminish, erode, or consume by long or hard use, attrition, or exposure. Often used with away, down, or off: rocks worn away by the sea; shoes worn down at the heels.
7. To produce by constant use, attrition, or exposure: eventually wore hollows in the stone steps.
8. To bring to a specified condition by long use or attrition: wore the clothes to rags; pebbles worn smooth.
9. To fatigue, weary, or exhaust: Your incessant criticism has worn my patience.
10. Nautical To make (a sailing ship) come about with the wind aft.
v.intr.
1.
a. To last under continual or hard use: a fabric that will wear.
b. To last through the passage of time: a friendship that wears well.
2. To break down or diminish through use or attrition: The rear tires began to wear.
3. To pass gradually or tediously: The hours wore on.
4. Nautical To come about with stern to windward.
n.
1. The act of wearing or the state of being worn; use: This shirt is ideal for wear in sultry climates.
2. Clothing, especially of a particular kind or for a particular use. Often used in combination: rainwear; footwear.
3. Damage resulting from use or age: The rug shows plenty of wear.
4. The ability to withstand impairment from use or attrition: The engine has plenty of wear left.
Phrasal Verbs:
wear down
To break down or exhaust by relentless pressure or resistance: The child's pleading finally wore her parents down.
wear off
To diminish gradually in effect: The drug wore off.
wear out
1. To make or become unusable through long or heavy use: wore out a pair of hockey skates; a vacuum that finally wore out.
2. To exhaust; tire: Raking the leaves wore me out.
3. To use up or consume gradually: His complaining finally wore out my patience.
Idioms:
wear the pants/trousers Informal
To exercise controlling authority in a household.
wear thin
1. To be weakened or eroded gradually: Her patience is wearing thin.
2. To become less convincing, acceptable, or popular, as through repeated use: excuses that are wearing thin.

[Middle English weren, from Old English werian; see wes- in Indo-European roots.]

wear′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.wear thin - deteriorate through use or stresswear thin - deteriorate through use or stress; "The constant friction wore out the cloth"
deteriorate - become worse or disintegrate; "His mind deteriorated"
ablate - wear away through erosion or vaporization
scuff - get or become scuffed; "These patent leather shoes scuffed"
References in periodicals archive ?
30pm BBC Two) LAST week, we saw how, after four years, the allure of living in a tin shack with no power, no toilet, no fridge and a plague of mice was starting to wear thin for Brolga, below.
The fabricated conflict begins to wear thin almost immediately, but practically speaking, it's hard to go wrong with Southern miscreants these days--unless that happens to be "Buckwild.
Team Sky's patience is beginning to wear thin and team principal Sir Dave Brailsford may invite the World Anti-Doping Agency to come and give their verdict on whether Froome's results are credible.
The warm words about UK manufacturing we have been hearing over the past two years are starting to wear thin.
For the countless women who have wanted to see skinny minnie Gwyneth Paltrow with a bit of meat on her bones - albeit thanks to a fatsuit - it's heavenly, but the jokes about the consequences of being overweight may wear thin for some.