weather-beaten


Also found in: Thesaurus.

weath·er-beat·en

(wĕth′ər-bēt′n)
adj.
1. Damaged or worn by exposure to the weather.
2. Lined or coarsened from being outdoors: a weather-beaten face.

weather-beaten

adj
1. showing signs of exposure to the weather
2. tanned or hardened by exposure to the weather

weath′er-beat`en



adj.
1. worn or damaged as a result of exposure to the weather.
2. tanned, hardened, or otherwise affected by exposure to weather: a weather-beaten face.
[1520–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.weather-beaten - tanned and coarsened from being outdoorsweather-beaten - tanned and coarsened from being outdoors; "a weather-beaten face"
toughened, tough - physically toughened; "the tough bottoms of his feet"
2.weather-beaten - worn by exposure to the weatherweather-beaten - worn by exposure to the weather; "a house of weathered shingles"
worn - affected by wear; damaged by long use; "worn threads on the screw"; "a worn suit"; "the worn pockets on the jacket"
Translations

weather-beaten

[ˈweðəˌbiːtn] ADJ [skin, face] → curtido; [wood] → deteriorado; [stone] → erosionado
the houses have a weather-beaten looken las casas se nota el efecto de los elementos

weather-beaten

[ˈwɛðəˌbiːtn] adj (rocks, building) → logorato/a dalle intemperie; (person, skin) → segnato/a dal tempo
References in classic literature ?
Here Meg meant to have a fountain, shrubbery, and a profusion of lovely flowers, though just at present the fountain was represented by a weather-beaten urn, very like a dilapidated slopbowl, the shrubbery consisted of several young larches, undecided whether to live or die, and the profusion of flowers was merely hinted by regiments of sticks to show where seeds were planted.
The long line of little gray, weather-beaten houses nestled peacefully among the orange trees.
The strong glare of the fire fell full upon his sturdy, weather-beaten countenance and forest attire, lending an air of romantic wildness to the aspect of an individual, who, seen by the sober light of day, would have exhibited the peculiarities of a man remarkable for the strangeness of his dress, the iron-like inflexibility of his frame, and the singular compound of quick, vigilant sagacity, and of exquisite simplicity, that by turns usurped the possession of his muscular features.
On my occasional visits to the town aforesaid, I seldom failed to turn down Pyncheon Street, for the sake of passing through the shadow of these two antiquities, --the great elm-tree and the weather-beaten edifice.
It pained, and at the same time amused me, to behold the terrors that attended my advent, to see a furrowed cheek, weather-beaten by half a century of storm, turn ashy pale at the glance of so harmless an individual as myself; to detect, as one or another addressed me, the tremor of a voice which, in long-past days, had been wont to bellow through a speaking-trumpet, hoarsely enough to frighten Boreas himself to silence.
This lonely spot, once used for an extempore burying-place, after a sanguinary BATTUE between the French and Austrians, is the perfection of desolation; there is nothing in sight to mark the hand of man, except the line of weather-beaten whitened posts, set up to indicate the direction of the pass in the OWDAWAKK of winter.
And at the zenith of his fame, how he would suddenly appear at the old village and stalk into church, brown and weather-beaten, in his black velvet doublet and trunks, his great jack-boots, his crimson sash, his belt bristling with horse-pistols, his crime-rusted cut- lass at his side, his slouch hat with waving plumes, his black flag unfurled, with the skull and crossbones on it, and hear with swelling ecstasy the whisperings, "It's Tom Sawyer the Pirate
To her surprise the surly old weather-beaten face actually changed its expression.
Kirke, with a shade of disappointment on his dark, weather-beaten face; "I never heard the name before.
The carol of the birds was loud and high, and, on the weather-beaten sill of the great window of the bed- chamber of Monsieur the Marquis, one little bird sang its sweetest song with all its might.
I stared at her weather-beaten side heeling steeply towards me; and then she passed out of my range of view.
No one would have thought in looking at this old, weather-beaten, floral-decked tower (which might be likened to an elderly dame dressed up to receive her grandchildren at a birthday feast) that it would have been capable of telling strange things, if, -- in addition to the menacing ears which the proverb says all walls are provided with, -- it had also a voice.