weaver


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weav·er

 (wē′vər)
n.
1. One that weaves: a weaver of fine rugs.
2. A weaverbird.

weaver

(ˈwiːvə)
n
1. (Textiles) a person who weaves, esp as a means of livelihood
2. (Animals) short for weaverbird

weav•er

(ˈwi vər)

n.
1. a person who weaves.
2. a person whose occupation is weaving.
3. Also called weav′er•bird` (-ˌbɜrd) any of numerous finchlike African and Asian birds of the family Ploceidae, noted for their elaborately woven nests and colonial habits.
[1325–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.weaver - a craftsman who weaves clothweaver - a craftsman who weaves cloth  
artisan, journeyman, artificer, craftsman - a skilled worker who practices some trade or handicraft
2.weaver - finch-like African and Asian colonial birds noted for their elaborately woven nestsweaver - finch-like African and Asian colonial birds noted for their elaborately woven nests
oscine, oscine bird - passerine bird having specialized vocal apparatus
baya, Ploceus philippinus - common Indian weaverbird
whidah, whydah, widow bird - mostly black African weaverbird
Java finch, Java sparrow, Padda oryzivora, ricebird - small finch-like Indonesian weaverbird that frequents rice fields
amadavat, avadavat - red Asian weaverbirds often kept as cage birds
grass finch, grassfinch - usually brightly-colored Australian weaverbirds; often kept as cage birds
Translations
ناسِج، حائِك
væver
takács
vefari
tkáč
tkalec

weaver

[ˈwiːvəʳ] Ntejedor(a) m/f

weaver

[ˈwiːvər] ntisserand(e) m/f

weaver

nWeber(in) m(f)

weaver

[ˈwiːvəʳ] ntessitore/trice

weave

(wiːv) past tense wove (wouv) : past participle woven (ˈwouvən) verb
1. to make by crossing strands in a pattern. to weave cloth.
2. to tell (an interesting story).
3. (past tense, past participle weaved) to move backwards and forwards or from side to side. The cyclist weaved in and out of the traffic.
ˈweaver noun
References in classic literature ?
She used the first money she got to buy a loom and became a weaver of carpets, and Alice got a place in Winney's store.
He was a weaver by trade; had been a skilled workman on tapestries and upholstery materials.
The farmer tills the soil, the miner digs in the earth, the weaver tends the loom, the mason carves the stone; the clever man invents, the shrewd man directs, the wise man studies, the inspired man sings--and all the result, the products of the labor of brain and muscle, are gathered into one stupendous stream and poured into their laps
The questionable sound of Silas's loom, so unlike the natural cheerful trotting of the winnowing-machine, or the simpler rhythm of the flail, had a half-fearful fascination for the Raveloe boys, who would often leave off their nutting or birds'-nesting to peep in at the window of the stone cottage, counterbalancing a certain awe at the mysterious action of the loom, by a pleasant sense of scornful superiority, drawn from the mockery of its alternating noises, along with the bent, tread-mill attitude of the weaver.
The subject might be placed in several other lights that would all lead to the same result; and in particular it might be asked, What greater affinity or relation of interest can be conceived between the carpenter and blacksmith, and the linen manufacturer or stocking weaver, than between the merchant and either of them?
A thing of stone beside Lake Kouen-ming Has for a thousand autumns borne the name Of the Celestial Weaver.
Pshaw, my dear fellow, what do the public, the great unobservant public, who could hardly tell a weaver by his tooth or a compositor by his left thumb, care about the finer shades of analysis and deduction
Neither will the builder make his tools--and he too needs many; and in like manner the weaver and shoemaker.
Perhaps some beloved female subscriber has arrayed an ass in the splendour and glory of her imagination; admired his dulness as manly simplicity; worshipped his selfishness as manly superiority; treated his stupidity as majestic gravity, and used him as the brilliant fairy Titania did a certain weaver at Athens.
Helene," he said quietly, "I suppose that you, who knew nothing of me till you left school, have looked upon me always as a selfish, passionless creature - a weaver of plots, perhaps sometimes a dreamer of dreams, but a person wholly self-centred, always self-engrossed?
He was a good power-loom weaver, and a man of perfect integrity.
One day two impostors arrived who gave themselves out as weavers, and said that they knew how to manufacture the most beautiful cloth imaginable.