weaver


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weav·er

 (wē′vər)
n.
1. One that weaves: a weaver of fine rugs.
2. A weaverbird.

weaver

(ˈwiːvə)
n
1. (Textiles) a person who weaves, esp as a means of livelihood
2. (Animals) short for weaverbird

weav•er

(ˈwi vər)

n.
1. a person who weaves.
2. a person whose occupation is weaving.
3. Also called weav′er•bird` (-ˌbɜrd) any of numerous finchlike African and Asian birds of the family Ploceidae, noted for their elaborately woven nests and colonial habits.
[1325–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.weaver - a craftsman who weaves clothweaver - a craftsman who weaves cloth  
artisan, journeyman, artificer, craftsman - a skilled worker who practices some trade or handicraft
2.weaver - finch-like African and Asian colonial birds noted for their elaborately woven nestsweaver - finch-like African and Asian colonial birds noted for their elaborately woven nests
oscine, oscine bird - passerine bird having specialized vocal apparatus
baya, Ploceus philippinus - common Indian weaverbird
whidah, whydah, widow bird - mostly black African weaverbird
Java finch, Java sparrow, Padda oryzivora, ricebird - small finch-like Indonesian weaverbird that frequents rice fields
amadavat, avadavat - red Asian weaverbirds often kept as cage birds
grass finch, grassfinch - usually brightly-colored Australian weaverbirds; often kept as cage birds
Translations
ناسِج، حائِك
væver
takács
vefari
tkáč
tkalec

weaver

[ˈwiːvəʳ] Ntejedor(a) m/f

weaver

[ˈwiːvər] ntisserand(e) m/f

weaver

nWeber(in) m(f)

weaver

[ˈwiːvəʳ] ntessitore/trice

weave

(wiːv) past tense wove (wouv) : past participle woven (ˈwouvən) verb
1. to make by crossing strands in a pattern. to weave cloth.
2. to tell (an interesting story).
3. (past tense, past participle weaved) to move backwards and forwards or from side to side. The cyclist weaved in and out of the traffic.
ˈweaver noun
References in classic literature ?
A thing of stone beside Lake Kouen-ming Has for a thousand autumns borne the name Of the Celestial Weaver.
The questionable sound of Silas's loom, so unlike the natural cheerful trotting of the winnowing-machine, or the simpler rhythm of the flail, had a half-fearful fascination for the Raveloe boys, who would often leave off their nutting or birds'-nesting to peep in at the window of the stone cottage, counterbalancing a certain awe at the mysterious action of the loom, by a pleasant sense of scornful superiority, drawn from the mockery of its alternating noises, along with the bent, tread-mill attitude of the weaver.
This view of Marner's personality was not without another ground than his pale face and unexampled eyes; for Jem Rodney, the mole-catcher, averred that one evening as he was returning homeward, he saw Silas Marner leaning against a stile with a heavy bag on his back, instead of resting the bag on the stile as a man in his senses would have done; and that, on coming up to him, he saw that Marner's eyes were set like a dead man's, and he spoke to him, and shook him, and his limbs were stiff, and his hands clutched the bag as if they'd been made of iron; but just as he had made up his mind that the weaver was dead, he came all right again, like, as you might say, in the winking of an eye, and said "Good-night", and walked off.
Such colloquies have occupied many a pair of pale-faced weavers, whose unnurtured souls have been like young winged things, fluttering forsaken in the twilight.
Neither will the builder make his tools--and he too needs many; and in like manner the weaver and shoemaker.
Yet even if we add neatherds, shepherds, and other herdsmen, in order that our husbandmen may have oxen to plough with, and builders as well as husbandmen may have draught cattle, and curriers and weavers fleeces and hides,--still our State will not be very large.
One day, two rogues, calling themselves weavers, made their appearance.
And he caused large sums of money to be given to both the weavers in order that they might begin their work directly.
So the two pretended weavers set up two looms, and affected to work very busily, though in reality they did nothing at all.
One day two impostors arrived who gave themselves out as weavers, and said that they knew how to manufacture the most beautiful cloth imaginable.
I will send my old and honoured minister to the weavers,' thought the Emperor.
Now we are delighted at that,' said both the weavers, and thereupon they named the colours and explained the make of the texture.