weaving


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weave

 (wēv)
v. wove (wōv), wo·ven (wō′vən), weav·ing, weaves
v.tr.
1.
a. To make (cloth) by interlacing the threads of the weft and the warp on a loom.
b. To interlace (threads, for example) into cloth.
2. To construct by interlacing or interweaving strips or strands of material: weave a basket.
3.
a. To interweave or combine (elements) into a complex whole: wove the incidents into a story.
b. To contrive (something complex or elaborate) in this way: weave a tale.
4. To introduce (another element) into a complex whole; work in: wove folk tunes into the symphony.
5. To attach hair extensions to (hair).
6. To spin (a web, for example).
7. past tense & past participle often weaved To make (a path or way) by winding in and out or from side to side: weaved our way through the heavy traffic.
v.intr.
1.
a. To engage in weaving; make cloth.
b. To work at a loom.
2. past tense and past participle often weaved To move in and out or sway from side to side.
n.
1. The pattern, method of weaving, or construction of a fabric: a twill weave; a loose weave.
2. A hairstyle in which hair extensions are attached to existing strands of hair.

[Middle English weven, from Old English wefan; see webh- in Indo-European roots.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.weaving - creating fabricweaving - creating fabric      
handicraft - a craft that requires skillful hands
netting - creating nets
Translations

weaving

[ˈwiːvɪŋ]
A. Ntejido m
basket weavingcestería f
B. CPD weaving machine Ntelar m
weaving mill Ntejeduría f

weaving

[ˈwiːvɪŋ] ntissage m

weaving

nWeberei f; (as craft) → Webkunst f

weaving

[ˈwiːvɪŋ] ntessitura
References in classic literature ?
Queequeg and I were mildly employed weaving what is called a sword-mat, for an additional lashing to our boat.
The Emperor soon sent another worthy statesman to see how the weaving was getting on, and whether the cloth would soon be finished.
With a great crowd of select followers, amongst whom were both the worthy statesmen who had already been there before, he went to the cunning impostors, who were now weaving with all their might, but without fibre or thread.
Through the lacings of the leaves, the great sun seemed a flying shuttle weaving the unwearied verdure.
Possibly in ten or twenty generations we might have worked up to the weaving of baskets.
to prepare flax for weaving as linen it is softened(technically, "retted") by soaking in water, separated from its woody fibers by beating ("scutched"--this seems to be what Cooper means by "crackling"), and finally combed ("hatcheled")}
But whether old or new, Spenser's power of using words and of weaving them together was wonderful.
It was a slow, clumsy, and costly way of weaving cloth, this cottage system of manufacture.
The shepherd himself, though he had good reason to believe that the bag held nothing but flaxen thread, or else the long rolls of strong linen spun from that thread, was not quite sure that this trade of weaving, indispensable though it was, could be carried on entirely without the help of the Evil One.
As the Phaeacians are the best sailors in the world, so their women excel all others in weaving, for Minerva has taught them all manner of useful arts, and they are very intelligent.
All threading and knitting and weaving do their fingers understand: thus do they make the hose of the spirit!
But, as it is not unreasonable to suppose that I may have held its threads with a more continuous attention than anyone else can have given them during its desultory publication, it is not unreasonable to ask that the weaving may be looked at in its completed state, and with the pattern finished.