wedge


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wedge

wedge

 (wĕj)
n.
1. A piece of material, such as metal or wood, thick at one edge and tapered to a thin edge at the other for insertion in a narrow crevice, used for splitting, tightening, securing, or levering.
2.
a. Something shaped like a wedge: a wedge of pie.
b. A wedge-shaped formation, as in ground warfare.
3.
a. Something that intrudes and causes division or disruption: His nomination drove a wedge into party unity.
b. Something that forces an opening or a beginning: a wedge in the war on poverty.
4. Meteorology See ridge.
5. Sports An iron golf club with a very slanted face, used to lift the ball sharply upward, as from sand.
6. A shoe having a heel that extends across the shank to the half sole, forming a continuous undersurface. Also called wedgie.
7. Downstate New York See submarine sandwich.
8. One of the various triangular marks that are the basic structural elements of cuneiform writing symbols.
9. Sports In snow skiing, the snowplow.
tr.v. wedged, wedg·ing, wedg·es
1. To split or force apart with or as if with a wedge: wedged the board away from the stud; neighbors who were wedged apart by a dispute.
2. To fix in place or tighten with a wedge: wedged the window frame to be level.
3. To crowd or squeeze into a limited space: wedged the books into the backpack.

[Middle English wegge, from Old English wecg.]

wedge

(wɛdʒ)
n
1. a block of solid material, esp wood or metal, that is shaped like a narrow V in cross section and can be pushed or driven between two objects or parts of an object in order to split or secure them
2. any formation, structure, or substance in the shape of a wedge: a wedge of cheese.
3. something such as an idea, action, etc, that tends to cause division
4. (Clothing & Fashion) a shoe with a wedge heel
5. (Golf) golf a club with a face angle of more than 50°, used for bunker shots (sand wedge) or pitch shots (pitching wedge)
6. (Physical Geography) a wedge-shaped extension of the high pressure area of an anticyclone, narrower than a ridge
7. (Mountaineering) mountaineering a wedge-shaped device, formerly of wood, now usually of hollow steel, for hammering into a crack to provide an anchor point
8. (Letters of the Alphabet (Foreign)) any of the triangular characters used in cuneiform writing
9. (Military) (formerly) a body of troops formed in a V-shape
10. (Photography) photog a strip of glass coated in such a way that it is clear at one end but becomes progressively more opaque towards the other end: used in making measurements of transmission density
11. slang Brit a bribe
12. thin end of the wedge anything unimportant in itself that implies the start of something much larger
vb
13. (tr) to secure with or as if with a wedge
14. to squeeze or be squeezed like a wedge into a narrow space
15. (tr) to force apart or divide with or as if with a wedge
[Old English wecg; related to Old Saxon weggi, Old High German wecki, Old Norse veggr wall]
ˈwedgeˌlike adj
ˈwedgy adj

wedge

(wɛdʒ)

n., v. wedged, wedg•ing. n.
1. a piece of hard material with two principal faces meeting in a sharply acute angle, for raising, holding, or splitting objects by applying a pounding or driving force. Compare machine (def. 2b).
2. a piece of anything of like shape: a wedge of pie.
3. a cuneiform character or stroke of this shape.
4. something that serves to part, split, divide, etc.: The quarrel drove a wedge between them.
5. an iron-headed golf club with a nearly horizontal face, used for lofting the ball.
6. a wedge heel or shoe with such a heel.
7. a V-shaped formation of infantry or cavalry, with the point directed toward the enemy.
9. Chiefly Coastal Connecticut and Rhode Island. a hero sandwich.
v.t.
10. to separate or split with or as if with a wedge (often fol. by open, apart, etc.).
11. to insert or fix with a wedge.
12. to pack or fix tightly; stuff.
13. to thrust, drive, fix, etc., like a wedge.
v.i.
14. to force a way like a wedge (usu. fol. by in, into, through, etc.).
[before 900; Middle English wegge (n.), Old English wecg, c. Old Saxon weggi, Old High German wecki, Old Norse veggr]

Wedge

 anything in the form of a wedge, e.g., a body of troops; a group of animals or birds; silver plate collectively, 1725.
Examples: wedge of cheese, 1835; of wild fowl, 1869; of clangorous geese, 1889; of wild geese, 1725; of horse, 1615; of men, 1614; of policemen, 1887; of standing people, 1913; of swans; of troops.

wedge


Past participle: wedged
Gerund: wedging

Imperative
wedge
wedge
Present
I wedge
you wedge
he/she/it wedges
we wedge
you wedge
they wedge
Preterite
I wedged
you wedged
he/she/it wedged
we wedged
you wedged
they wedged
Present Continuous
I am wedging
you are wedging
he/she/it is wedging
we are wedging
you are wedging
they are wedging
Present Perfect
I have wedged
you have wedged
he/she/it has wedged
we have wedged
you have wedged
they have wedged
Past Continuous
I was wedging
you were wedging
he/she/it was wedging
we were wedging
you were wedging
they were wedging
Past Perfect
I had wedged
you had wedged
he/she/it had wedged
we had wedged
you had wedged
they had wedged
Future
I will wedge
you will wedge
he/she/it will wedge
we will wedge
you will wedge
they will wedge
Future Perfect
I will have wedged
you will have wedged
he/she/it will have wedged
we will have wedged
you will have wedged
they will have wedged
Future Continuous
I will be wedging
you will be wedging
he/she/it will be wedging
we will be wedging
you will be wedging
they will be wedging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been wedging
you have been wedging
he/she/it has been wedging
we have been wedging
you have been wedging
they have been wedging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been wedging
you will have been wedging
he/she/it will have been wedging
we will have been wedging
you will have been wedging
they will have been wedging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been wedging
you had been wedging
he/she/it had been wedging
we had been wedging
you had been wedging
they had been wedging
Conditional
I would wedge
you would wedge
he/she/it would wedge
we would wedge
you would wedge
they would wedge
Past Conditional
I would have wedged
you would have wedged
he/she/it would have wedged
we would have wedged
you would have wedged
they would have wedged

wedge

1. A narrow area of high pressure between two depressions.
2. Wedge-shaped club used for lofting the ball.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wedge - any shape that is triangular in cross sectionwedge - any shape that is triangular in cross section
triangle, trigon, trilateral - a three-sided polygon
2.wedge - a large sandwich made of a long crusty roll split lengthwise and filled with meats and cheese (and tomato and onion and lettuce and condiments)wedge - a large sandwich made of a long crusty roll split lengthwise and filled with meats and cheese (and tomato and onion and lettuce and condiments); different names are used in different sections of the United States
sandwich - two (or more) slices of bread with a filling between them
3.wedge - a diacritical mark (an inverted circumflex) placed above certain letters (such as the letter c) to indicate pronunciation
diacritic, diacritical mark - a mark added to a letter to indicate a special pronunciation
4.wedge - a heel that is an extension of the sole of the shoewedge - a heel that is an extension of the sole of the shoe
heel - the bottom of a shoe or boot; the back part of a shoe or boot that touches the ground and provides elevation
wedgie - a shoe with a wedge heel
5.wedge - (golf) an iron with considerable loft and a broad sole
golf, golf game - a game played on a large open course with 9 or 18 holes; the object is use as few strokes as possible in playing all the holes
iron - a golf club that has a relatively narrow metal head
pitching wedge - a wedge used to loft the golf ball over obstacles
sand wedge - a wedge used to get out of sand traps
6.wedge - something solid that is usable as an inclined plane (shaped like a V) that can be pushed between two things to separate them
ax head, axe head - the cutting head of an ax
colter, coulter - a sharp steel wedge that precedes the plow and cuts vertically through the soil
inclined plane - a simple machine for elevating objects; consists of plane surface that makes an acute angle with the horizontal
moldboard, mouldboard - wedge formed by the curved part of a steel plow blade that turns the furrow
ploughshare, plowshare, share - a sharp steel wedge that cuts loose the top layer of soil
coign, coigne, quoin - expandable metal or wooden wedge used by printers to lock up a form within a chase
shim - a thin wedge of material (wood or metal or stone) for driving into crevices
7.wedge - a block of wood used to prevent the sliding or rolling of a heavy objectwedge - a block of wood used to prevent the sliding or rolling of a heavy object
block - a solid piece of something (usually having flat rectangular sides); "the pyramids were built with large stone blocks"
sprag - a chock or bar wedged under a wheel or between the spokes to prevent a vehicle from rolling down an incline
Verb1.wedge - put, fix, force, or implant; "lodge a bullet in the table"; "stick your thumb in the crack"
fasten, fix, secure - cause to be firmly attached; "fasten the lock onto the door"; "she fixed her gaze on the man"
redeposit - deposit anew; "The water had redeposited minerals on the rocks"
2.wedge - squeeze like a wedge into a tight spacewedge - squeeze like a wedge into a tight space; "I squeezed myself into the corner"
impact - press or wedge together; pack together
compress, pack together, compact - make more compact by or as if by pressing; "compress the data"
move, displace - cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense; "Move those boxes into the corner, please"; "I'm moving my money to another bank"; "The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant"

wedge

verb
1. squeeze, force, lodge, jam, crowd, block, stuff, pack, thrust, ram, cram, stow He wedged himself between the door and the radiator.
noun
1. block, segment, lump, chunk, triangle, slab, hunk, chock, wodge (Brit. informal) a wedge of cheese
Translations
إسْفينشَيءٌ على شَكْل إسْفينينْحَشِر، يَعْلَق
klín
kilekile faststykke
kiila
klinkriška
ékék alakú szeletbeékel
fleygurgeiriverîa blÿfastur
cuneus
pleištastrikampis gabaliukasvagis
gabaliņšieķīlētieķīlētiesiespriestiesķīlis
klinový
kil
kamakama şeklinde parçasıkış maktakoz

wedge

[wedʒ]
A. N
1. (for keeping in position) → cuña f, calza f
to drive a wedge between two peopleabrir una brecha entre dos personas
this is the thin end of the wedgeesto puede ser el principio de muchos males
2. (= piece) [of cheese, cake] → porción f, pedazo m (grande)
3. (Golf) → wedge m, cucharilla f
B. VT to wedge sth in placeasegurar algo
to wedge a door openmantener abierta una puerta con una cuña or una calza
I was wedged between two other passengersme estuve apretado or inmovilizado entre otros dos pasajeros
it's wedgedno se puede mover
C. CPD wedge heel Ntacón m de cuña
wedge in VT + ADV the car was wedged in between two lorriesel coche quedó encajado entre dos camiones
a short documentary wedged in between sports programmesun documental corto encasillado entre programas deportivos

wedge

[ˈwɛdʒ]
n
[wood] → coin m; (under door)cale f
[cake, cheese] → part f
to drive a wedge between sb and sb → creuser un fossé entre qn et qn
the thin end of the wedge → le commencement des ennuis
vt
(= fix) → caler
to wedge sth open → caler qch en position ouverte
(= push) → enfoncer, coincer
to wedge sth in sth → enfoncer qch dans qch
to be wedged between → être coincé(e) entrewedge-heeled shoes [ˈwɛdʒhiːld] nplchaussures fpl à semelles compenséeswedge-shaped [ˈwɛdʒʃeɪpt] adjen forme de coin

wedge

n
(of wood etc, fig) → Keil m; rubber wedgeGummibolzen m; it’s the thin end of the wedgeso fängts immer an; that would be the thin end of the wedgedas wäre der Anfang von Ende; she is driving a wedge between ussie treibt einen Keil zwischen uns
(= triangular shape) (of cake etc)Stück nt; (of cheese)Ecke f; a wedge of landein keilförmiges Stück Land; the seats were arranged in a wedgedie Sitzreihen waren keilförmig angeordnet
(= shoe)Schuh mmit Keilabsatz; (also wedge heel)Keilabsatz m
vt
(= fix with a wedge)verkeilen, (mit einem Keil) festklemmen; to wedge a door/window open/shuteine Tür/ein Fenster festklemmen or verkeilen
(fig: = pack tightly) to wedge oneself/somethingsich/etw zwängen (→ in in +acc); to be wedged between two things/peoplezwischen zwei Dingen/Personen eingekeilt or eingezwängt sein; the fat man sat wedged in his chairder dicke Mann saß in seinen Stuhl gezwängt; we were all wedged together in the back of the carwir saßen alle zusammengepfercht or eingezwängt im Fond des Wagens; try wedging the cracks with newspaperversuchen Sie, die Spalten mit Zeitungspapier zuzustopfen

wedge

[wɛdʒ]
1. n (under door) → zeppa; (for splitting sth) → cuneo; (piece, of cheese, cake) → fetta
it's the thin end of the wedge (fig) → è l'inizio della fine
to drive a wedge between two people → intaccare il rapporto tra due persone
2. vtmettere una zeppa sotto or in
to wedge a door open → tenere aperta una porta con un fermo
the car was wedged between two lorries → la macchina era incastrata tra due camion

wedge

(wedʒ) noun
1. a piece of wood or metal, thick at one end and sloping to a thin edge at the other, used in splitting wood etc or in fixing something tightly in place. She used a wedge under the door to prevent it swinging shut.
2. something similar in shape. a wedge of cheese.
verb
to fix or become fixed by, or as if by, a wedge or wedges. He is so fat that he got wedged in the doorway.

wedge

n. cuña.
References in classic literature ?
Men of his strength of purpose and customary sagacity, if they chance to adopt a mistaken opinion in practical matters, so wedge it and fasten it among things known to be true, that to wrench it out of their minds is hardly less difficult than pulling up an oak.
A quoin is a solid which differs from a wedge in having its sharp end formed by the steep inclination of one side, instead of the mutual tapering of both sides.
The boy wondered and grieved that she could not eat; and when, putting his arms round her neck, he tried to wedge some of his cake into her mouth, it seemed to her that the rising in her throat would choke her.
The broad base of this monster wedge is planted upon a grand glacier-paved Alpine platform whose elevation is ten thousand feet above sea-level; as the wedge itself is some five thousand feet high, it follows that its apex is about fifteen thousand feet above sea-level.
Why, you two was scuffling, and he fetched you one with the headboard and you fell flat; and then up you come, all reeling and staggering like, and snatched the knife and jammed it into him, just as he fetched you another awful clip -- and here you've laid, as dead as a wedge til now.
The brick house did not speedily become a sort of wayside inn, a place of innocent revelry and joyous welcome; but the missionary company was an entering wedge, and Miranda allowed one spare bed to be made up "in case anything should happen," while the crystal glasses were kept on the second from the top, instead of the top shelf, in the china closet.
Insert the wedge into the Prerogative Office, and the country would cease to be glorious.
In all his ways of sitting and standing, and eating and drinking - of brooding about, in a high-shouldered reluctant style - of taking out his great horn-handled jack-knife and wiping it on his legs and cutting his food - of lifting light glasses and cups to his lips, as if they were clumsy pannikins - of chopping a wedge off his bread, and soaking up with it the last fragments of gravy round and round his plate, as if to make the most of an allowance, and then drying his finger-ends on it, and then swallowing it - in these ways and a thousand other small nameless instances arising every minute in the day, there was Prisoner, Felon, Bondsman, plain as plain could be.
For if a Soldier is a wedge, a Woman is a needle; being, so to speak, ALL point, at least at the two extremities.
The Nautilus entered the brittle mass like a wedge, and split it with frightful crackings.
Beyond the pit stood the little wedge of people with the white flag at its apex, arrested by these phenomena, a little knot of small vertical black shapes upon the black ground.
Those who were called skillful leaders of old knew how to drive a wedge between the enemy's front and rear; to prevent co-operation between his large and small divisions; to hinder the good troops from rescuing the bad, the officers from rallying their men.