weedy

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Related to weediness: weeded out, weedier

weed·y

 (wē′dē)
adj. weed·i·er, weed·i·est
1. Full of or consisting of weeds: a weedy lawn.
2. Being, characteristic of, or resembling a weed: a weedy plant.
3. Of a scrawny build; spindly or gawky.

weed′i·ly adv.
weed′i·ness n.

weedy

(ˈwiːdɪ)
adj, weedier or weediest
1. (Botany) full of or containing weeds: weedy land.
2. (Botany) (of a plant) resembling a weed in rapid or straggling growth
3. informal thin or weakly in appearance
ˈweedily adv
ˈweediness n

weed•y

(ˈwi di)

adj. weed•i•er, weed•i•est.
1. consisting of, abounding in, or pertaining to weeds.
2. (of a plant, flower, etc.) growing poorly or in a straggling manner.
3. (of a person or animal) scrawny.
[1375–1425]
weed′i•ly, adv.
weed′i•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.weedy - abounding with or resembling weedsweedy - abounding with or resembling weeds; "a weedy path"; "weedy plants that take over a garden"
weedless - free from weeds; "a weedless garden"
2.weedy - being very thin; "a child with skinny freckled legs"; "a long scrawny neck"
lean, thin - lacking excess flesh; "you can't be too rich or too thin"; "Yon Cassius has a lean and hungry look"-Shakespeare

weedy

adjective weak, thin, frail, skinny, feeble, ineffectual, puny, undersized, weak-kneed (informal), namby-pamby, nerdy or nurdy (slang) a neurotic, weedy little man

weedy

adjective
Having little flesh or fat on the body:
Idioms: all skin and bones, thin as a rail.
Translations

weedy

[ˈwiːdɪ] ADJ (weedier (compar) (weediest (superl)))
1. [ground] → lleno de malas hierbas or hierbajos
2. (Brit) (= scrawny) [person] → debilucho, desmirriado, enclenque

weedy

[ˈwiːdi] adj [person] → gringalet

weedy

adj (+er)
groundunkrautbewachsen, voll(er) Unkraut
(inf) personschmächtig; (in character) → blutarm

weedy

[ˈwiːdɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (fam) (person) → allampanato/a
References in classic literature ?
Palfrey's farmyard doors had the paint all worn off them, and the front garden walks had long been merged in a general weediness.
In 1986, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy published a policy statement on the regulation of biotechnology that focused oversight and regulatory triggers on the risk-related characteristics of products, such as plants' weediness or toxicity.
A 'yes' response favors acceptance (or reduced risk of invasion), under the assumption that domestication generally reduces the inherent weediness of wild types, which are wild plants not selected for production traits (Pheloung et al.
Researchers assess any potential effect on the environment, such as the plant cross-breeding with wild relatives, and potential for weediness or damage to friendly insects.
The statement called for oversight and regulatory triggers to focus on the risk-related characteristics of products, such as plants' weediness or toxicity, rather than on the process used for genetic modification.
They say they are "particularly troubled by proposals to expand EPA's oversight into areas such as virus resistance and weediness that have been adequately addressed by the USDA since 1986.
The CFIA concluded that such crosses would not be invasive, nor result in increased weediness or invasiveness, and could be managed by current agronomic practices.
Washington, September 4 (ANI): A new research has determined that flowering plants originated not as trees, but as relatively non-woody "pre-trees" that could outcompete ancient plants like conifers, thus reinventing the concept of weediness.
Although these domesticated plants are also aliens--tomatoes and corn from Central and South Americas, cotton from what is now Pakistan, safflower and alfalfa from the Near and Middle East, and rice from China, any residual weediness has been eliminated through many years of breeding.