weigh


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Related to weigh: weigh anchor, weigh down, Weight Watchers

weigh 1

 (wā)
v. weighed, weigh·ing, weighs
v.tr.
1.
a. To determine the weight of, as with a scale: weighed the tomatoes before buying them.
b. To measure or apportion (a certain quantity) by weight. Often used with out: weighed out a pound of cheese.
2.
a. To balance in the mind in order to make a choice; ponder or evaluate: weighed the alternatives and decided to stay.
b. To choose carefully or deliberately: weigh one's words.
3. Nautical To raise (anchor).
v.intr.
1. To be of a specific weight: The dog weighs nearly 50 pounds.
2. To have consequence or importance: The decision weighed heavily against us.
3.
a. To cause to bend heavily by added weight. Used with on or upon: a coating of ice that weighed on the slender branches.
b. To be burdensome or oppressive. Used with on or upon: These concerns have been weighing on us for weeks.
4. Nautical To raise anchor.
Phrasal Verbs:
weigh down
1. To cause to bend down with added weight: vines that were weighed down with grapes.
2. To give great worry or difficulty to; burden: The responsibilities of the new job weighed him down.
weigh in
1. Sports To be weighed at a weigh-in.
2. To have one's baggage weighed, as at an airport.
3. To be of a specified weight: The new book weighs in at 7 pounds.
4. Slang To join in a discussion; utter a remark: She weighed in with some pertinent facts.

[Middle English weien, from Old English wegan; see wegh- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

weigh′a·ble adj.
weigh′er n.

weigh 2

 (wā)
n. Nautical
Way. Used in the phrase under weigh.

[Variant (influenced by weigh, as in weigh anchor) of way.]

weigh

(weɪ)
vb
1. (tr) to measure the weight of
2. (intr) to have weight or be heavy: she weighs more than her sister.
3. (often foll by: out) to apportion according to weight
4. (tr) to consider carefully: to weigh the facts of a case.
5. (intr) to be influential: his words weighed little with the jury.
6. (often foll by: on) to be oppressive or burdensome (to)
7. obsolete to regard or esteem
8. (Nautical Terms) weigh anchor to raise a vessel's anchor or (of a vessel) to have its anchor raised preparatory to departure
[Old English wegan; related to Old Frisian wega, Old Norse vega, Gothic gawigan, German wiegen]
ˈweighable adj
ˈweigher n

weigh

(weɪ)
n
under weigh a variant spelling of under way
[C18: variation due to the influence of phrases such as to weigh anchor]

weigh

(weɪ)

v.t.
1. to determine or ascertain the force that gravitation exerts upon (a person or thing) by use of a balance, scale, or other mechanical device.
2. to measure or apportion (a certain quantity of something) according to weight (usu. fol. by out): weighed out five pounds of sugar.
3. to make heavy; increase the weight or bulk of; weight.
4. to evaluate in the mind; consider carefully in order to reach an opinion, decision, or choice: Let's weigh the facts.
v.i.
5. to have weight or a specified amount of weight: to weigh less; to weigh a ton.
6. to have importance, moment, or consequence.
7. to bear down as a weight or burden (usu. fol. by on or upon): Responsibility weighed upon her.
8. to consider carefully or judicially: to weigh well before deciding.
9. weigh down,
a. to cause to become bowed under a weight.
b. to lower the spirits of; burden; depress.
10. weigh in,
a. (of a boxer or wrestler) to be weighed by a medical examiner on the day of a bout.
b. (of a jockey) to be weighed with the saddle and weights after a race.
c. to be of the weight determined by such a weighing.
11. weigh out, (of a jockey)
a. to be weighed with the saddle and weights before a race.
b. to be of the weight determined by such a weighing.
Idioms:
weigh anchor, to heave up a ship's anchor in preparation for getting under way.
[before 900; Middle English weghen, Old English wegan to carry, weigh, c. Old Saxon, Old High German wegan to move, weigh, Old Norse vega to move, Gothic gawigan to move, shake; akin to way1, wain]
weigh′a•ble, adj.
weigh′er, n.

weigh

  • dispense - Ultimately from Latin dispendere, "weigh out."
  • expend - Comes from ex-, "out," and pendere, "weigh; pay"; originally, it referred to spending money, with the root sense being "to weigh out money."
  • preponderate - Once meant "weigh more" and "have greater intellectual weight."
  • spend - A blend of Latin pendere, "pay, weigh," and expendere, "pay out."

weigh


Past participle: weighed
Gerund: weighing

Imperative
weigh
weigh
Present
I weigh
you weigh
he/she/it weighs
we weigh
you weigh
they weigh
Preterite
I weighed
you weighed
he/she/it weighed
we weighed
you weighed
they weighed
Present Continuous
I am weighing
you are weighing
he/she/it is weighing
we are weighing
you are weighing
they are weighing
Present Perfect
I have weighed
you have weighed
he/she/it has weighed
we have weighed
you have weighed
they have weighed
Past Continuous
I was weighing
you were weighing
he/she/it was weighing
we were weighing
you were weighing
they were weighing
Past Perfect
I had weighed
you had weighed
he/she/it had weighed
we had weighed
you had weighed
they had weighed
Future
I will weigh
you will weigh
he/she/it will weigh
we will weigh
you will weigh
they will weigh
Future Perfect
I will have weighed
you will have weighed
he/she/it will have weighed
we will have weighed
you will have weighed
they will have weighed
Future Continuous
I will be weighing
you will be weighing
he/she/it will be weighing
we will be weighing
you will be weighing
they will be weighing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been weighing
you have been weighing
he/she/it has been weighing
we have been weighing
you have been weighing
they have been weighing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been weighing
you will have been weighing
he/she/it will have been weighing
we will have been weighing
you will have been weighing
they will have been weighing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been weighing
you had been weighing
he/she/it had been weighing
we had been weighing
you had been weighing
they had been weighing
Conditional
I would weigh
you would weigh
he/she/it would weigh
we would weigh
you would weigh
they would weigh
Past Conditional
I would have weighed
you would have weighed
he/she/it would have weighed
we would have weighed
you would have weighed
they would have weighed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.weigh - have a certain weightweigh - have a certain weight    
measure - have certain dimensions; "This table surfaces measures 20inches by 36 inches"
librate, weigh - determine the weight of; "The butcher weighed the chicken"
2.weigh - show consideration forweigh - show consideration for; take into account; "You must consider her age"; "The judge considered the offender's youth and was lenient"
3.weigh - determine the weight ofweigh - determine the weight of; "The butcher weighed the chicken"
measure, quantify - express as a number or measure or quantity; "Can you quantify your results?"
heft - test the weight of something by lifting it
weigh - have a certain weight
4.weigh - have weightweigh - have weight; have import, carry weight; "It does not matter much"
be - have the quality of being; (copula, used with an adjective or a predicate noun); "John is rich"; "This is not a good answer"
press, weigh - to be oppressive or burdensome; "weigh heavily on the mind", "Something pressed on his mind"
5.weigh - to be oppressive or burdensomeweigh - to be oppressive or burdensome; "weigh heavily on the mind", "Something pressed on his mind"
matter, count, weigh - have weight; have import, carry weight; "It does not matter much"

weigh

verb
1. have a weight of, tip the scales at (informal) His wife weighs over 22 stone.
2. measure the weight of, put someone or something on the scales, measure how heavy someone or something is They counted and weighed the fruits.
3. (often with up) consider, study, examine, contemplate, evaluate, ponder, mull over, think over, eye up, reflect upon, give thought to, meditate upon, deliberate upon He is weighing the possibility of filing charges against the doctor.
4. compare, balance, contrast, juxtapose, place side by side We must weigh the pros and cons of each method.
5. matter, carry weight, cut any ice (informal), impress, tell, count, have influence, be influential His opinion doesn't weigh much with me, I'm afraid.
weigh on someone oppress, burden, depress, distress, plague, prey, torment, hang over, bear down, gnaw at, cast down, take over The separation weighed on both of them.
weigh someone down
1. burden, overload, encumber, overburden, tax, weight, strain, handicap, saddle, hamper The soldiers were weighed down by their heavy packs.
weigh someone up assess, judge, gauge, appraise, eye someone up, size someone up (informal) As soon as I walked into his office I could see him weighing me up.
weigh something out measure, dole out, apportion, deal out I weighed out portions of tea and sugar.

weigh

verb
1. To be of significance or importance:
phrasal verb
weigh down
To make sad or gloomy:
phrasal verb
weigh on or upon
To come to mind continually:
Translations
يَزِنيَزِنُيكونُ حِملا ثَقيلا
vážit
vejefå vejet
painaapunnitapuntaroidaarvioidamitata
težiti
nyomroskadozik
íòyngjavegavega, vigta
重さが・・・ある
무게를 달다
besvorisnesvarumaspadidinti svorįpakelti inkarąpasisverti
apkrautnokrautnospiestnosvērtsvērt
vážiť
tehtati
väga
ชั่งน้ำหนัก
ağırlığında olmakbelini bükmekbunaltmakçekmekgelmek/çekmek
cân

weigh

[weɪ]
A. VT
1. (= measure weight of) → pesar
to weigh o.s.pesarse
2. (= consider) [+ evidence, options, risks] → sopesar, considerar
the advantages of surgery have to be weighed against possible riskslas ventajas de la cirugía se tienen que contraponer a los posibles riesgos
to weigh the pros and cons (of sth)sopesar or considerar los pros y los contras (de algo)
see also word A1
3. to weigh anchorlevar anclas
B. VI
1. (= tip the scales at) → pesar
it weighs four kilospesa cuatro kilos
how much or what do you weigh?¿cuánto pesas?
this weighs a ton!¡esto pesa un quintal!
2. (fig)
2.1. (= be influential) → influir
to weigh against sth/sbser un factor en contra de algo/algn
there are many factors weighing against the meeting happeninghay muchos factores en contra de que tenga lugar la reunión
to weigh in favour of sth/sbser un factor a favor de algo/algn, inclinar la balanza a favor de algo/algn
all these factors will weigh heavily with voterstodos estos factores influirán mucho en los votantes
2.2. (= be a burden) to weigh on sbagobiar a algn
her absence began to weigh on mesu ausencia comenzó a agobiarme
to weigh on sb's consciencepesar sobre la conciencia de algn
it weighs (heavily) on her mindle preocupa (mucho)
eat something that won't weigh on your stomachcome algo que no te resulte pesado al estómago
weigh down
A. VT + ADV
1. (lit)
1.1. (= hold down) → sujetar (con un peso/una piedra )
1.2. (= encumber) don't take anything with you that will weigh you downno te lleves nada que te suponga demasiado peso
she was weighed down with parcelsiba muy cargada de paquetes
a branch weighed down with fruituna rama muy cargada de fruta
2. (fig) → agobiar, abrumar (more liter)
to be weighed down with or by sorrowestar abrumado por la pena
he felt weighed down with or by responsibilitiesse sentía agobiado por las responsabilidades
I was weighed down by guiltme pesaba el sentimiento de culpabilidad
the government is weighed down with or by debtel gobierno está cargado de deudas
B. VI + ADV to weigh down on sbagobiar a algn, abrumar a algn (more liter)
sorrow weighed down on herla pena la abrumaba
weigh in
A. VI + ADV
1. [boxer, jockey] → pesarse
to weigh in at 65 kilospesar 65 kilos
2. (at airport desk) → facturar el equipaje
3. (= contribute) → intervenir
he weighed in with his opinionintervino con or expresando su opinión
he weighed in with the argument thatintervino afirmando que ...
B. VT + ADV
1. [+ boxer, jockey] → pesar
2. [+ luggage] → pesar, facturar
weigh out VT + ADV [+ goods, ingredients, kilo] → pesar
weigh up (esp Brit) VT + ADV [+ situation, risks, alternatives, evidence] → sopesar, considerar; [+ person] → sondear, tantear
we looked at each other, weighing each other upnos miramos, sondeándonos or tanteándonos el uno al otro
I'm weighing up whether to go or notestoy considerando si ir o no

weigh

[ˈweɪ]
vt
[+ person, food] → peser
First, weigh the flour → Tout d'abord, pesez la farine.
to weigh oneself → se peser
(= consider) [+ evidence, options] → considérer
to weigh the pros and cons → peser le pour et le contre
to weigh anchor → lever l'ancre
vipeser
How much do you weigh? → Combien est-ce que tu pèses?
She weighs 50kg → Elle pèse 50 kg.
weigh down
vt sep
[snow] [+ branch] → alourdir
[load] [+ person] → alourdir
[worry, problem] [+ person] → accabler
to be weighed down with sth → être accablé(e) par qch
weigh on
vt fus [problem, worry] → peser à
The separation weighed on both of them → La séparation leur pesait à tous deux.
to weigh on sb's mind → peser à qn
weigh out
vt sep [+ goods, ingredients] → peser
weigh up
vt sep [+ advantages, alternatives] → peser; [+ person] → jauger
I weighed up the pros and cons → J'ai pesé le pour et le contre.

weigh

vt
(lit) goods, person, oneself etcwiegen; could you weigh these bananas/this piece of cheese for me?könnten Sie mir diese Bananen/dieses Stück Käse abwiegen or auswiegen?
(fig) words, problem, merits etcabwägen; to weigh something in one’s mindetw erwägen; to weigh A against BA gegen B abwägen, A und B gegeneinander abwägen
(Naut) to weigh anchorden Anker lichten
vi
(lit)wiegen; to weigh heavy/light (scales)zu viel/zu wenig anzeigen; (inf: material) → schwer/leicht wiegen
(fig: = be a burden) → lasten (→ on auf +dat)
(fig: = be important) → gelten; to weigh with somebodyGewicht bei jdm haben, jdm etwas gelten; his age weighed against himsein Alter wurde gegen ihn in die Waagschale geworfen

weigh

:
weighbridge
weigh-in
n (Sport) → Wiegen nt

weigh

[weɪ]
1. vt
a. (also) (fig) → pesare
it weighs a ton (also) (fig) → pesa una tonnellata
to weigh sth in one's hand → soppesare qc
to weigh sth in one's mind → soppesare mentalmente qc
to weigh the pros and cons → valutare i pro e i contro
b. to weigh anchor (Naut) → salpare, levare l'ancora
2. vi (fig) (be a worry) to weigh on sbpesare su qn
to weigh with sb → avere importanza or contare per qn
it weighs on her mind → la preoccupa
that didn't weigh with him → quello per lui non aveva importanza
weigh down vt + adv (branches) → piegare; (person, with worry) → opprimere
to be weighed down by sth → curvarsi sotto il peso di qc
to be weighed down with sorrows → essere oppresso/a dai dispiaceri
weigh in vi + adv (Sport) → pesarsi (prima di una gara)
he weighed in at 60 kilos → al controllo del peso era 60 chili
weigh out vt + adv (goods) → pesare
weigh up vt + adv (alternatives, situation) → pesare, valutare

weigh

(wei) verb
1. to find the heaviness of (something) by placing it on a scale. He weighed himself on the bathroom scales; You must have your luggage weighed at the airport.
2. to be equal to in heaviness. This parcel weighs one kilo; How much / What does this box weigh?
3. to be a heavy burden to. She was weighed down with two large suitcases.
weight (weit) noun
1. the amount which a person or thing weighs. He's put on a lot of weight (= got much fatter) over the years.
2. a piece of metal etc of a standard weight. seven-pound weight.
3. a heavy object, especially one for lifting as a sport. He lifts weights to develop his muscles.
4. burden; load. You have taken a weight off my mind.
5. importance. Her opinion carries a lot of weight.
verb
1. to attach, or add, a weight or weights to. The plane is weighted at the nose so that it balances correctly in flight.
2. to hold down by attaching weights. They weighted the balloon to prevent it from flying away.
ˈweightless adjective
not affected by the earth's gravity pull. The astronauts became weightless on going into orbit round the earth.
ˈweightlessness noun
ˈweighty adjective
1. important. a weighty reason.
2. heavy.
ˈweightily adverb
ˈweightiness noun
ˈweighing-machine noun
a (public) machine for weighing people, loads etc; a scale. I weighed myself on the weighing-machine at the railway station.
ˈweightlifting noun
the sport of lifting weights.
weigh anchor
to lift a ship's anchor in preparation for sailing.
weigh in to find one's weight before a fight, after a horse-race etc ( ˈweigh-in) noun
weigh out
to measure out by weighing. He weighed out six kilos of sand.
weigh up
to calculate, estimate; to consider. He weighed up his chances of success.

weigh

يَزِنُ vážit veje wiegen ζυγίζω pesar painaa peser težiti pesare 重さが・・・ある 무게를 달다 wegen veie zważyć pesar взвешивать väga ชั่งน้ำหนัก çekmek cân 称重量

weigh

vt, vi pesar; The nurse will weigh you..La enfermera lo va a pesar...How much do you weigh?..¿Cuánto pesa?
References in classic literature ?
Meg had told her adventures gayly and said over and over what a charming time she had had, but something still seemed to weigh upon her spirits, and when the younger girls were gone to bed, she sat thoughtfully staring at the fire, saying little and looking worried.
But the main fact is that it is made of solid gold, and may weigh anywhere from one to two tons.
There are many physical as well as moral facts which corroborate this opinion, and some few that would seem to weigh against it.
It does weigh on me so not to do my duty in any way!
May Heaven forgive you, Hepzibah," said Judge Pyncheon, --reverently lifting his eyes towards that high court of equity to which he appealed,--"if you suffer any ancient prejudice or animosity to weigh with you in this matter.
The wiser effort would have been to diffuse thought and imagination through the opaque substance of to-day, and thus to make it a bright transparency; to spiritualise the burden that began to weigh so heavily; to seek, resolutely, the true and indestructible value that lay hidden in the petty and wearisome incidents, and ordinary characters with which I was now conversant.
He appeared to weigh my question, but in a manner quite detached and almost helpless.
But then, the idea was, that his presence was by no means necessary in getting the ship under weigh, and steering her well out to sea.
She works in a canning factory, and all day long she handles cans of beef that weigh fourteen pounds.
Being myself one of the laziest of mortals, I had altogether too much fellow-feeling for the lazy; and when poor, shiftless dogs put stones at the bottom of their cotton-baskets to make them weigh heavier, or filled their sacks with dirt, with cotton at the top, it seemed so exactly like what I should do if I were they, I couldn't and wouldn't have them flogged for it.
When I trotted, I rattled like a crate of dishes, and that annoyed me; and moreover I couldn't seem to stand that shield slatting and banging, now about my breast, now around my back; and if I dropped into a walk my joints creaked and screeched in that wearisome way that a wheelbarrow does, and as we didn't create any breeze at that gait, I was like to get fried in that stove; and besides, the quieter you went the heavier the iron set- tled down on you and the more and more tons you seemed to weigh every minute.
I have spent my life under his saddle - with him in it, too, and he is good for two hundred pounds, without his clothes; and there is no telling how much he does weigh when he is out on the war-path and has his batteries belted on.