weighty


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weight·y

 (wā′tē)
adj. weight·i·er, weight·i·est
1. Having considerable weight; heavy. See Synonyms at heavy.
2. Burdensome; oppressive: weighty problems. See Synonyms at burdensome.
3. Of great consequence; serious or momentous: the weighty matters before the delegates at the peace talks.
4. Having great power or influence: a weighty argument.

weight′i·ly adv.
weight′i·ness n.

weighty

(ˈweɪtɪ)
adj, weightier or weightiest
1. having great weight
2. important or momentous
3. causing anxiety or worry
ˈweightily adv
ˈweightiness n

weight•y

(ˈweɪ ti)

adj. weight•i•er, weight•i•est.
1. having considerable weight; heavy; ponderous.
2. burdensome or troublesome.
3. important or momentous.
4. having or exerting influence, power, etc.
[1480–90]
weight′i•ly, adv.
weight′i•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.weighty - having relatively great weightweighty - having relatively great weight; heavy; "a weighty load"; "a weighty package"
weightless - having little or no weight or apparent gravitational pull; light; "floating freely in a weightless condition"; "a baby bat...fluffy and weightless as a moth"; "jackets made of a weightless polyester fabric"
2.weighty - powerfully persuasiveweighty - powerfully persuasive; "a cogent argument"; "a telling presentation"; "a weighty argument"
persuasive - intended or having the power to induce action or belief; "persuasive eloquence"; "a most persuasive speaker"; "a persuasive argument"
3.weighty - of great gravity or crucial importweighty - of great gravity or crucial import; requiring serious thought; "grave responsibilities"; "faced a grave decision in a time of crisis"; "a grievous fault"; "heavy matters of state"; "the weighty matters to be discussed at the peace conference"
important, of import - of great significance or value; "important people"; "the important questions of the day"
4.weighty - weighing heavily on the spirit; causing anxiety or worry; "weighty problems"
heavy - marked by great psychological weight; weighted down especially with sadness or troubles or weariness; "a heavy heart"; "a heavy schedule"; "heavy news"; "a heavy silence"; "heavy eyelids"
5.weighty - excessively fatweighty - excessively fat; "a weighty man"  
fat - having an (over)abundance of flesh; "he hadn't remembered how fat she was"

weighty

adjective
2. heavy, massive, dense, hefty (informal), cumbersome, ponderous, burdensome Simon lifted a weighty volume from the shelf.
3. onerous, taxing, demanding, difficult, worrying, crushing, exacting, oppressive, burdensome, worrisome, backbreaking the weighty responsibility of organizing the entire event

weighty

adjective
1. Having a relatively great weight:
3. Requiring great or extreme bodily, mental, or spiritual strength:
4. Having great consequence or weight:
5. Having or exercising influence:
Translations
ثَقيلمُهِم
betydningsfuldtungvigtig
áhrifamikill, mikilvægurmjög òungur
pádny

weighty

[ˈweɪtɪ] ADJ (weightier (compar) (weightiest (superl)))
1. (lit) [load] → pesado
a weighty tome or volumeun tomo de peso
2. (fig) [matter, problem] → grave; [argument, reason] → importante, de peso; [burden] → pesado; [responsibility] → grande

weighty

[ˈweɪti] adj
(= heavy) [object] → pesant(e)
(= serious) [matter, subject] → pesant(e)

weighty

adj (+er)
(lit)schwer
(fig)gewichtig; (= influential) argumentschwerwiegend, gewichtig; (= burdensome) responsibilityschwerwiegend, schwer

weighty

[ˈweɪtɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (fig) (problems, duties, considerations) → importante

weigh

(wei) verb
1. to find the heaviness of (something) by placing it on a scale. He weighed himself on the bathroom scales; You must have your luggage weighed at the airport.
2. to be equal to in heaviness. This parcel weighs one kilo; How much / What does this box weigh?
3. to be a heavy burden to. She was weighed down with two large suitcases.
weight (weit) noun
1. the amount which a person or thing weighs. He's put on a lot of weight (= got much fatter) over the years.
2. a piece of metal etc of a standard weight. seven-pound weight.
3. a heavy object, especially one for lifting as a sport. He lifts weights to develop his muscles.
4. burden; load. You have taken a weight off my mind.
5. importance. Her opinion carries a lot of weight.
verb
1. to attach, or add, a weight or weights to. The plane is weighted at the nose so that it balances correctly in flight.
2. to hold down by attaching weights. They weighted the balloon to prevent it from flying away.
ˈweightless adjective
not affected by the earth's gravity pull. The astronauts became weightless on going into orbit round the earth.
ˈweightlessness noun
ˈweighty adjective
1. important. a weighty reason.
2. heavy.
ˈweightily adverb
ˈweightiness noun
ˈweighing-machine noun
a (public) machine for weighing people, loads etc; a scale. I weighed myself on the weighing-machine at the railway station.
ˈweightlifting noun
the sport of lifting weights.
weigh anchor
to lift a ship's anchor in preparation for sailing.
weigh in to find one's weight before a fight, after a horse-race etc ( ˈweigh-in) noun
weigh out
to measure out by weighing. He weighed out six kilos of sand.
weigh up
to calculate, estimate; to consider. He weighed up his chances of success.
References in classic literature ?
It was known, by all present, to be the brave precursor of a weighty and important judgment.
Hence, too, might be drawn a weighty lesson from the little-regarded truth, that the act of the passing generation is the germ which may and must produce good or evil fruit in a far-distant time; that, together with the seed of the merely temporary crop, which mortals term expediency, they inevitably sow the acorns of a more enduring growth, which may darkly overshadow their posterity.
So, one fine morning I ascended the flight of granite steps, with the President's commission in my pocket, and was introduced to the corps of gentlemen who were to aid me in my weighty responsibility as chief executive officer of the Custom-House.
Still more, for the ample fins, I here saw but a few disordered joints; and in place of the weighty and majestic, but boneless flukes, an utter blank
Their good luck, they felt, had given them the right to think about a home; and sitting out on the doorstep that summer evening, they held consultation about it, and Jurgis took occasion to broach a weighty subject.
The objections which have been brought against a standing army, and they are many and weighty, and deserve to prevail, may also at last be brought against a standing government.
Thus: If one's duties have kept him in the house all the week, it will rest him to be out on Sunday; if his duties have required him to read weighty and serious matter all the week, it will rest him to read light matter on Sunday; if his occupation has busied him with death and funerals all the week, it will rest him to go to the theater Sunday night and put in two or three hours laughing at a comedy; if he is tired with digging ditches or felling trees all the week, it will rest him to lie quiet in the house on Sunday; if the hand, the arm, the brain, the tongue, or any other member, is fatigued with inanition, it is not to be rested by added a day's inanition; but if a member is fatigued with exertion, inanition is the right rest for it.
ONE of the reasons why Tom's mind had drifted away from its secret troubles was, that it had found a new and weighty matter to interest itself about.
Whether Catherine had spent her tears, or whether the grief were too weighty to let them flow, she sat there dry-eyed till the sun rose: she sat till noon, and would still have remained brooding over that deathbed, but I insisted on her coming away and taking some repose.
With a lightened heart, though with a profound sense of the weighty importance of my task, I devoted the whole afternoon to the composition of the draft of this letter; for which great purpose, Agnes relinquished her desk to me.
That part of the subject (I reminded her) involved matters which could form no part of my explanation, for they were the weighty secrets of another.
I see,'' said he, ``Sir Sluggish Knight, that thou art a man of prudence and of counsel; and moreover, I see that my poor monastic fare likes thee not, accustomed, perhaps, as thou hast been, to the license of courts and of camps, and the luxuries of cities; and now I bethink me, Sir Sluggard, that when the charitable keeper of this forest-walk left those dogs for my protection, and also those bundles of forage, he left me also some food, which, being unfit for my use, the very recollection of it had escaped me amid my more weighty meditations.