weir


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weir

 (wîr)
n.
1. A fence or wattle placed in a stream to catch or retain fish.
2. A dam placed across a river or canal to raise or divert the water, as for a millrace, or to regulate or measure the flow.

[Middle English were, from Old English wer; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

weir

(wɪə)
n
1. (Civil Engineering) a low dam that is built across a river to raise the water level, divert the water, or control its flow
2. (Angling) a series of traps or enclosures placed in a stream to catch fish
[Old English wer; related to Old Norse ver, Old Frisian were, German Wehr]

Weir

(wɪə)
n
1. (Biography) David (Russell). born 1979, English wheelchair athlete; won ten medals for Britain, including six golds, over three Olympic Games (2004–2012); won the London Marathon six times
2. (Biography) Judith. born 1954, Scottish composer: her operas include A Night at the Chinese Opera (1987), and Armida (2005)
3. (Biography) Peter. born 1944, Australian film director; his films include Dead Poets Society (1989), The Truman Show (1998), and Master and Commander (2003)

weir

(wɪər)

n.
1. a small dam in a river or stream.
2. a fence, as of brush, or a net set in a stream, channel, etc., for catching fish.
[before 900; Middle English were, Old English wer, derivative of root of werian to defend, dam up]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.weir - a low dam built across a stream to raise its level or divert its flowweir - a low dam built across a stream to raise its level or divert its flow
dam, dike, dyke - a barrier constructed to contain the flow of water or to keep out the sea
2.weir - a fence or wattle built across a stream to catch or retain fish
fence, fencing - a barrier that serves to enclose an area
Translations
سَد صَغير، قَنْطَرَة إحْتِجاز
dæmning
bukógát
stíflugarîur
aizsprostsdambis
hať
bentdalyan

weir

[wɪə>ʳ] N
1. (= dam) → presa f
2. (= fish trap) → encañizada f, cañal m

weir

[ˈwɪər] nbarrage m

weir

n
(= barrier)Wehr nt
(= fish trap)Fischreuse f

weir

[wɪəʳ] nsbarramento

weir

(wiə) noun
a dam across a river, with a drop on one side.
References in classic literature ?
John says if I don't pick up faster he shall send me to Weir Mitchell in the fall.
The skies they were ashen and sober; The leaves they were crisped and sere -- The leaves they were withering and sere; It was night in the lonesome October Of my most immemorial year: It was hard by the dim lake of Auber, In the misty mid region of Weir: -- It was down by the dank tarn of Auber, In the ghoul-haunted woodland of Weir.
We noted not the dim lake of Auber,(Though once we had journeyed down here) We remembered not the dank tarn of Auber, Nor the ghoul-haunted woodland of Weir.
They were never out of the sound of some purling weir, whose buzz accompanied their own murmuring, while the beams of the sun, almost as horizontal as the mead itself, formed a pollen of radiance over the landscape.
A flow of words doth ever ease the heart of sorrows; it is like opening the waste weir when the mill dam is overfull.
At the end of five minutes, I thought we ought to be pretty near the weir, and I looked up.
It may not have been so always, for I remember a black night when a poor lieutenant lay down in an oarless boat and let it drift toward the weir.
At any rate, I could catch her to Samoa, and change at Apia to one of the Weir Line freighters.
The hymn must therefore be later than that date, though Terpander, according to Weir Smyth (16), may have only modified the scale of the lyre; yet while the burlesque character precludes an early date, this feature is far removed, as Allen and Sikes remark, from the silliness of the "Battle of the Frogs and Mice", so that a date in the earlier part of the sixth century is most probable.
The Reverend Septimus Crisparkle (Septimus, because six little brother Crisparkles before him went out, one by one, as they were born, like six weak little rushlights, as they were lighted), having broken the thin morning ice near Cloisterham Weir with his amiable head, much to the invigoration of his frame, was now assisting his circulation by boxing at a looking-glass with great science and prowess.
It was an awful sort of fishing, but it no more disconcerted Mr Inspector than if he had been fishing in a punt on a summer evening by some soothing weir high up the peaceful river.
The country was hilly, with occasional fir plantations and bleak upland spaces, but also with numerous farms, and the hills were deeply intersected by the gorges of several winding rivers interrupted at intervals by the banked-up ponds and weirs of electric generating wheels.