weird


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weird

 (wîrd)
adj. weird·er, weird·est
1. Strikingly odd or unusual, especially in an unsettling way; strange: He lives in a weird old house on a dark street. Your neighbor is said to be a little weird. I felt a little weird after drinking that tea.
2. Suggestive of the supernatural: weird stories about ghosts.
3. Archaic Of or relating to fate or the Fates.
n. Archaic
1. Fate; destiny.
2. One's assigned lot or fortune, especially when evil.
tr. & intr.v. weird·ed, weird·ing, weirds
Slang To experience or cause to experience an odd, unusual, and sometimes uneasy sensation. Often used with out.

[Middle English werd, wird, fate (often in the pl. wirdes, the Fates), from Old English wyrd; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

weird′ly adv.
weird′ness n.
Synonyms: weird, eerie, uncanny, unearthly
These adjectives refer to what is of a mysteriously strange, usually frightening nature. Weird may suggest the operation of supernatural influences, or merely the odd or unusual: "Nameless voices—weird sounds that awake in a Southern forest at twilight's approach,—were crying a sinister welcome to the settling gloom" (Kate Chopin). "The platypus ... seemed so weird when first discovered that a specimen sent to a museum was thought to be a hoax: bits of mammal and bits of bird stitched together" (Richard Dawkins).
Something eerie inspires fear or uneasiness and implies a sinister influence: "His white countenance was rendered eerie by the redness of the sagging lids below his eyes" (John Updike).
Uncanny refers to what is impossible to explain or accept: "My mother had an uncanny ability to see right through to my motives. At the time I wondered if she had ESP" (Porter Shreve).
Something unearthly seems so strange and unnatural as to come from or belong to another world: "The joy of having escaped death made the unearthly ruins of Hamburg seem more like a smoldering paradise than the purgatory other people thought our once lovely city had become" (Marione Ingram).

weird

(wɪəd)
adj
1. (Alternative Belief Systems) suggestive of or relating to the supernatural; eerie
2. strange or bizarre
3. (Classical Myth & Legend) archaic of or relating to fate or the Fates
n
4. fate or destiny
5. (Classical Myth & Legend) one of the Fates
6. dree one's weird Scot See dree
vb
(tr) Scot to destine or ordain by fate; predict
[Old English (ge)wyrd destiny; related to weorthan to become, Old Norse urthr bane, Old Saxon wurd; see worth2]
ˈweirdly adv
ˈweirdness n

weird

(wɪərd)

adj. -er, -est,
n. adj.
1. involving or suggesting the supernatural; unearthly or uncanny: a weird sound.
2. strange; unusual; peculiar: a weird costume.
3. Archaic. concerned with or controlling fate or destiny.
n. Chiefly Scot.
4. fate; destiny.
[before 900; (n.) Middle English (northern form of wird), Old English wyrd; akin to worth2; (adj.) Middle English, orig. attributive n. in phrase werde sisters the Fates (popularized as appellation of the witches in Macbeth)]
weird′ly, adv.
weird′ness, n.
syn: weird, eerie, uncanny refer to that which is mysterious and apparently outside natural law. weird suggests the intervention of supernatural influences in human affairs: weird doings in the haunted house; a weird coincidence. eerie refers to something ghostly that makes one's flesh creep: eerie moans from a deserted house. uncanny refers to an extraordinary or remarkable thing that seems to defy the laws established by experience: an uncanny ability to recall numbers.

weird


Past participle: weirded
Gerund: weirding

Imperative
weird
weird
Present
I weird
you weird
he/she/it weirds
we weird
you weird
they weird
Preterite
I weirded
you weirded
he/she/it weirded
we weirded
you weirded
they weirded
Present Continuous
I am weirding
you are weirding
he/she/it is weirding
we are weirding
you are weirding
they are weirding
Present Perfect
I have weirded
you have weirded
he/she/it has weirded
we have weirded
you have weirded
they have weirded
Past Continuous
I was weirding
you were weirding
he/she/it was weirding
we were weirding
you were weirding
they were weirding
Past Perfect
I had weirded
you had weirded
he/she/it had weirded
we had weirded
you had weirded
they had weirded
Future
I will weird
you will weird
he/she/it will weird
we will weird
you will weird
they will weird
Future Perfect
I will have weirded
you will have weirded
he/she/it will have weirded
we will have weirded
you will have weirded
they will have weirded
Future Continuous
I will be weirding
you will be weirding
he/she/it will be weirding
we will be weirding
you will be weirding
they will be weirding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been weirding
you have been weirding
he/she/it has been weirding
we have been weirding
you have been weirding
they have been weirding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been weirding
you will have been weirding
he/she/it will have been weirding
we will have been weirding
you will have been weirding
they will have been weirding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been weirding
you had been weirding
he/she/it had been weirding
we had been weirding
you had been weirding
they had been weirding
Conditional
I would weird
you would weird
he/she/it would weird
we would weird
you would weird
they would weird
Past Conditional
I would have weirded
you would have weirded
he/she/it would have weirded
we would have weirded
you would have weirded
they would have weirded
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Weird - fate personified; any one of the three Weird Sisters
Anglo-Saxon deity - (Anglo-Saxon mythology) a deity worshipped by the Anglo-Saxons
Adj.1.weird - suggesting the operation of supernatural influencesweird - suggesting the operation of supernatural influences; "an eldritch screech"; "the three weird sisters"; "stumps...had uncanny shapes as of monstrous creatures"- John Galsworthy; "an unearthly light"; "he could hear the unearthly scream of some curlew piercing the din"- Henry Kingsley
supernatural - not existing in nature or subject to explanation according to natural laws; not physical or material; "supernatural forces and occurrences and beings"
2.weird - strikingly odd or unusual; "some trick of the moonlight; some weird effect of shadow"- Bram Stoker
strange, unusual - being definitely out of the ordinary and unexpected; slightly odd or even a bit weird; "a strange exaltation that was indefinable"; "a strange fantastical mind"; "what a strange sense of humor she has"

weird

adjective
1. strange, odd, unusual, bizarre, ghostly, mysterious, queer, unearthly, eerie, grotesque, supernatural, unnatural, far-out (slang), uncanny, spooky (informal), creepy (informal), eldritch (poetic) I had such a weird dream last night.
strange natural, normal, regular, usual, ordinary, typical, mundane
2. bizarre, odd, strange, unusual, queer, grotesque, unnatural, creepy (informal), outlandish, freakish I don't like that guy - he's really weird.
bizarre common, natural, normal, regular, usual, ordinary, typical

weird

adjective
1. Of a mysteriously strange and usually frightening nature:
Informal: spooky.
3. Causing puzzlement; perplexing:
Translations
عَجِيبغَريب
podivný
underlig
omituinen
čudan
annarlegur, dularfullur
変な
별난
dīvainsmistisks
čuden
konstig
แปลกประหลาด
kỳ dị

weird

[wɪəd] ADJ (weirder (compar) (weirdest (superl))) → raro, extraño
the weird thing is thatlo raro es que ...
all sorts of weird and wonderful thingstodo tipo de cosas extraordinarias

weird

[ˈwɪərd] adj [person, appearance] → bizarre; [experience, coincidence, feeling] → bizarre
It felt weird going back to Liverpool → Cela faisait bizarre de revenir à Liverpool.

weird

adj (+er) (= uncanny)unheimlich; (inf: = odd) → seltsam

weird

[wɪəd] adj (-er (comp) (-est (superl))) → strano/a, bizzarro/a

weird

(wiəd) adjective
odd or very strange. a weird story; She wears weird clothes.
ˈweirdly adverb
ˈweirdness noun

weird

عَجِيب podivný underlig seltsam αλλόκοτος extraño omituinen bizarre čudan bizzarro 変な 별난 vreemd underlig dziwny esquisito сверхъестественный konstig แปลกประหลาด acayip kỳ dị 怪异的
References in classic literature ?
Hagar, the witch, chanted an awful incantation over her kettleful of simmering toads, with weird effect.
And in the gleams, constantly growing brighter as more fuel was piled on, the young inventor and his chum saw a weird sight.
In the solitude of night, with the hum of the great city rising below her-- at times even in theatres or crowded assemblies of men and women-- she forgot herself, and again stood in the weird brilliancy of that moonlight night in mute worship at the foot of that slowly-rising mystic altar of piled terraces, hanging forests, and lifted plateaus that climbed forever to the lonely skies.
Laughing so shrilly that all the market-place could hear her, the weird old gentlewoman took her departure.
It was a weird sight, there on the killing beds--a throng of stupid black Negroes, and foreigners who could not understand a word that was said to them, mixed with pale-faced, hollow-chested bookkeepers and clerks, half-fainting for the tropical heat and the sickening stench of fresh blood--and all struggling to dress a dozen or two cattle in the same place where, twenty-four hours ago, the old killing gang had been speeding, with their marvelous precision, turning out four hundred carcasses every hour!
Huge pomegranate trees, with their glossy leaves and flame-colored flowers, dark-leaved Arabian jessamines, with their silvery stars, geraniums, luxuriant roses bending beneath their heavy abundance of flowers, golden jessamines, lemon-scented verbenum, all united their bloom and fragrance, while here and there a mystic old aloe, with its strange, massive leaves, sat looking like some old enchanter, sitting in weird grandeur among the more perishable bloom and fragrance around it.
These weird apparitions had been handsome youths, clad in fashionable attire, fifteen minutes before, but now they did not resemble any beings one ever sees unless in nightmares.
Now a weird flash turned night into day and showed every little grass-blade, separate and distinct, that grew about their feet.
They found new corridors and corners and flights of steps and new old pictures they liked and weird old things they did not know the use of.
From the streets beyond the high wall and the strong gate, there came the usual night hum of the city, with now and then an indescribable ring in it, weird and unearthly, as if some unwonted sounds of a terrible nature were going up to Heaven.
She uttered the word with an eager look, and with strong emphasis, and with a weird smile that had a kind of boast in it.
If the veil of melancholy over those adorable features had not still appeared to the young man as the last trace of the weird drama in whose toils that mysterious child was struggling, he could have believed that Christine was not its heroine at all.