well-attested

well-attested

adj (well attested when postpositive)
widely affirmed as correct or true
References in periodicals archive ?
This, by now well-attested finding is the best argument for the intrusion of outsiders into the homes of neglectful or cruel caregivers, and it is the best explanation for the observation that poverty accompanies lower achievement all over the world.
Kaskal' 5 [2008]: 1-47), in which case Ur-Nanse's plaque could be a forerunner of a future, well-attested artistic agenda.
The only massacre by the Gaddafi regime, involving hundreds of victims, which is so far well-attested, is the killings at Abu Salim prison in Tripoli in 1996, when up to 1,200 prisoners died, according to a credible witness who survived.
This ritual is well-attested from other pyramids, so, from what I can see, Behenu's copy does not add much new.
Keller argues that there are no well-attested miracles in the sense of events that the action of a deity would be required to effect.
His accuracy in covering events is well-attested to.
If we pursue his biological logic, what would we make of the well-attested fact that the most reproductively successful element of the population from the mid-18th century by far has been the least economically successful element of the English population.
Interestingly enough, Wetherbee himself cites the example of Pyramus's mulberry being "read in a well-attested exegetical tradition as standing for the Cross of Christ" (211).
Unfortunately, her own equally radical, attempt to reinterpret the work's composition and content less in terms of its well-attested Tractarian sub-text and more in relation to what she calls Millais's 'probable dialogue (p.
When combined with an historically well-attested aversion to direct confrontation, it is little wonder that Wales is too often the land of the pulled punch.
Salzman examines several well-attested episodes from the western empire in the fourth and fifth centuries, including an incident in the Val di Non, Italy, in 397, three episodes of violence in North Africa in 399, 408, and 420, and pagan-Christian violence in Gaul in the late fourth century.
This process reflects the general tendency of any kind of intervention to persist and grow, leading in this case to the well-attested phenomenon of "imperial overreach.