wend


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Related to wend: Wendish

Wend

 (wĕnd)
n.
1. Any of a group of Slavic peoples formerly inhabiting much of what is now eastern Germany and western Poland, especially the present-day Sorbs.
2. Any of various other non-Germanic peoples living in central Europe during late antiquity and the Middle Ages.

[German Wende, from Middle High German Winde, Wende, from Old High German Winid; see wen- in Indo-European roots.]

Wend adj.

wend

 (wĕnd)
v. wend·ed, wend·ing, wends
v.tr.
To proceed on or along; go: wend one's way home.
v.intr.
To go one's way; proceed.

[Middle English wenden, from Old English wendan.]

wend

(wɛnd)
vb
to direct (one's course or way); travel: wend one's way home.
[Old English wendan; related to Old High German wenten, Gothic wandjan; see wind2]

Wend

(wɛnd)
n
1. (Peoples) (esp in medieval European history) a Sorb; a member of the Slavonic people who inhabited the area between the Rivers Saale and Oder in the early Middle Ages and were conquered by Germanic invaders by the 12th century. See also Lusatia
2. (Historical Terms) (esp in medieval European history) a Sorb; a member of the Slavonic people who inhabited the area between the Rivers Saale and Oder in the early Middle Ages and were conquered by Germanic invaders by the 12th century. See also Lusatia

wend

(wɛnd)

v. wend•ed (Archaic) went; wend•ing. v.t.
1. to pursue or direct (one's way).
v.i.
2. to proceed or go; travel.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English wendan, c. Old Saxon wendian, Old High German wentan, Old Norse venda, Gothic wandjan to turn, turn away; causative of -windan to wind2]

Wend

(wɛnd)

n.
[1780–90; < German Wende, Old High German Winida, c. Old English Winedas (pl.)]

wend


Past participle: wended
Gerund: wending

Imperative
wend
wend
Present
I wend
you wend
he/she/it wends
we wend
you wend
they wend
Preterite
I wended
you wended
he/she/it wended
we wended
you wended
they wended
Present Continuous
I am wending
you are wending
he/she/it is wending
we are wending
you are wending
they are wending
Present Perfect
I have wended
you have wended
he/she/it has wended
we have wended
you have wended
they have wended
Past Continuous
I was wending
you were wending
he/she/it was wending
we were wending
you were wending
they were wending
Past Perfect
I had wended
you had wended
he/she/it had wended
we had wended
you had wended
they had wended
Future
I will wend
you will wend
he/she/it will wend
we will wend
you will wend
they will wend
Future Perfect
I will have wended
you will have wended
he/she/it will have wended
we will have wended
you will have wended
they will have wended
Future Continuous
I will be wending
you will be wending
he/she/it will be wending
we will be wending
you will be wending
they will be wending
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been wending
you have been wending
he/she/it has been wending
we have been wending
you have been wending
they have been wending
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been wending
you will have been wending
he/she/it will have been wending
we will have been wending
you will have been wending
they will have been wending
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been wending
you had been wending
he/she/it had been wending
we had been wending
you had been wending
they had been wending
Conditional
I would wend
you would wend
he/she/it would wend
we would wend
you would wend
they would wend
Past Conditional
I would have wended
you would have wended
he/she/it would have wended
we would have wended
you would have wended
they would have wended
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.wend - direct one's course or way; "wend your way through the crowds"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"

wend

verb
wend your way go, move, travel, progress, proceed, make for, direct your course sleepy-eyed commuters who wended their way to work

wend

verb
To move along a particular course:
Translations

wend

[wend] VT (liter) to wend one's way toenderezar sus pasos a
to wend one's way home (hum) → encaminarse a casa

wend

[ˈwɛnd] vt
to wend one's way (= make one's way) → se mettre en cheminWendy house [ˈwɛndihaʊs] n (British)cabane f de jeu

wend

vt to wend one’s way home/to the bar etcsich auf den Heimweg/zur Bar etc begeben

wend

[wɛnd] vt (frm) to wend one's way homeincamminarsi verso casa
References in classic literature ?
And thou, Waldemar, wilt thou take lance and shield, and lay down thy policies, and wend along with me, and share the fate which God sends us?
Aye, and all the surrounding country was early awake, too, and began to wend their way to Finsbury Field, a fine broad stretch of practice ground near Moorfields.
It was not far from the Buytenhof to Hoogstraet (High Street); and a stranger, who since the beginning of this scene had watched all its incidents with intense interest, was seen to wend his way with, or rather in the wake of, the others towards the Town-hall, to hear as soon as possible the current news of the hour.
When to the lake's sun-dimpled marge the bright procession wends, The languid lilies raise their heads as though to greet their friends; When down the river-banks they roam, The white moon-lady leads them home.
Professor Wend, will go head-tohead with a range of high profile individuals including broadcaster Shereen Nanjiani and actor Alan Bisset, in a battle to see who can sell the most copies and raise the most funds for the Big Issue and Scottishbased charity International Network of Street Papers.
The Wends, known as Sorbs in Germany, began leaving eastern Germany in the mid-19th century to preserve their language, their Lutheran religion, and a culture rich in folklore and traditions.
On behalf of the people we serve, we at World Bicycle Relief appreciate the support from Stiv Wilson, Editor in Chief, and everyone at Wend Magazine.
For example, Pughneere is a legitimate child, whereas his brother, Wend Kuuni, was adopted.
Marshalling their thoughts around a table away from the throng, a group from Skegness - Patricia, Monica, Wend and Chrissie - were taking in their first experience of the royal meeting, and getting over an eight-hour journey that ended with the discovery that there was no paper in the ladies' toilets in the coach park.
To find the mill, you wend your way through a special industrial zone, where you are greeted by several large billboards announcing the virtues of industrial development.
Knollwood Country Club, an open-to-the-public course that is part of the Los Angeles County system, is another reasonably priced layout and one that offer great variety in its holes, which wend through a well-established neighborhood filled with large trees.
The faeries, demons, and spirits of Celtic provenance that wend through the work of British poet John Keats (1795-1821), were not born of the usual literary sources such as Spenser, Shakespeare, and Milton, says Gallant (English literature, Georgia State U.