wet-nurse


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wet-nurse

(wĕt′nûrs′)
tr.v. wet-nursed, wet-nurs·ing, wet-nurs·es
1. To serve as wet nurse for.
2. To treat with excessive care.

wet′ nurse`


n.
a woman hired to suckle another's infant.
[1610–20]

wet′-nurse`



v.t. -nursed, -nurs•ing.
1. to act as a wet nurse to (an infant).
2. to give excessive care or attention to.
[1775–85]

wet-nurse


Past participle: wet-nursed
Gerund: wet-nursing

Imperative
wet-nurse
wet-nurse
Present
I wet-nurse
you wet-nurse
he/she/it wet-nurses
we wet-nurse
you wet-nurse
they wet-nurse
Preterite
I wet-nursed
you wet-nursed
he/she/it wet-nursed
we wet-nursed
you wet-nursed
they wet-nursed
Present Continuous
I am wet-nursing
you are wet-nursing
he/she/it is wet-nursing
we are wet-nursing
you are wet-nursing
they are wet-nursing
Present Perfect
I have wet-nursed
you have wet-nursed
he/she/it has wet-nursed
we have wet-nursed
you have wet-nursed
they have wet-nursed
Past Continuous
I was wet-nursing
you were wet-nursing
he/she/it was wet-nursing
we were wet-nursing
you were wet-nursing
they were wet-nursing
Past Perfect
I had wet-nursed
you had wet-nursed
he/she/it had wet-nursed
we had wet-nursed
you had wet-nursed
they had wet-nursed
Future
I will wet-nurse
you will wet-nurse
he/she/it will wet-nurse
we will wet-nurse
you will wet-nurse
they will wet-nurse
Future Perfect
I will have wet-nursed
you will have wet-nursed
he/she/it will have wet-nursed
we will have wet-nursed
you will have wet-nursed
they will have wet-nursed
Future Continuous
I will be wet-nursing
you will be wet-nursing
he/she/it will be wet-nursing
we will be wet-nursing
you will be wet-nursing
they will be wet-nursing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been wet-nursing
you have been wet-nursing
he/she/it has been wet-nursing
we have been wet-nursing
you have been wet-nursing
they have been wet-nursing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been wet-nursing
you will have been wet-nursing
he/she/it will have been wet-nursing
we will have been wet-nursing
you will have been wet-nursing
they will have been wet-nursing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been wet-nursing
you had been wet-nursing
he/she/it had been wet-nursing
we had been wet-nursing
you had been wet-nursing
they had been wet-nursing
Conditional
I would wet-nurse
you would wet-nurse
he/she/it would wet-nurse
we would wet-nurse
you would wet-nurse
they would wet-nurse
Past Conditional
I would have wet-nursed
you would have wet-nursed
he/she/it would have wet-nursed
we would have wet-nursed
you would have wet-nursed
they would have wet-nursed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wet-nurse - a woman hired to suckle a child of someone elsewet-nurse - a woman hired to suckle a child of someone else
nanny, nursemaid, nurse - a woman who is the custodian of children
Verb1.wet-nurse - give suck to; "The wetnurse suckled the infant"; "You cannot nurse your baby in public in some places"
suck - draw into the mouth by creating a practical vacuum in the mouth; "suck the poison from the place where the snake bit"; "suck on a straw"; "the baby sucked on the mother's breast"
feed, give - give food to; "Feed the starving children in India"; "don't give the child this tough meat"
Translations

wet

(wet) adjective
1. containing, soaked in, or covered with, water or another liquid. We got soaking wet when it began to rain; His shirt was wet through with sweat; wet hair; The car skidded on the wet road.
2. rainy. a wet day; wet weather; It was wet yesterday.
verbpresent tense ˈwetting: past tense, past participles wet, ~ˈwetted
to make wet. She wet her hair and put shampoo on it; The baby has wet himself / his nappy / the bed.
noun
1. moisture. a patch of wet.
2. rain. Don't go out in the wet.
ˈwetness noun
wet blanket
a depressing companion.
ˈwet-nurse noun
a woman employed to breast-feed someone else's baby.
ˈwetsuit noun
a rubber suit for wearing in cold conditions when diving etc.
wet through
soaked to the skin.
References in classic literature ?
A stout waist, the plumpness of a wet-nurse, strong dimpled arms, red hands, were all in keeping with the swelling outlines and the fat whiteness of Norman beauty.
Now this very Eudosia Halfacre has no more mother, in the last sense, than you have a wet-nurse.
I liked this offer very well, and accordingly hired a coach on purpose, and taking my child, and a wet-nurse to tend and suckle it, and a maid-servant with me, away I went for London.
Consequently, according to the Prime Minister, state-owned enterprises remain a wet-nurse and the foundation of corruption in the country.
As a manager you can only do so much for a player; you cannot wet-nurse him.
London, October 11 ( ANI ): A study has revealed that some subordinate female meerkats wet-nurse a dominant female's offspring in exchange for not being evicted from the group.
There was considerable debate in the run up to George's birth over whether the duchess would hand her child off to a royal wet-nurse or feed through formula.
His grandfather) Kehat called him Avigdor ("source of protection"), because on his account God's protecting hedge grew up around Israel, so that the Egyptians could no longer cast their sons into the Nile; his wet-nurse called him Avi-Soko ("source of shelter"), because God would cover him with a canopy to conceal him from the Egyptians; and the Israelites called him Shemayah ben-Netanel ("the Eternal One has heard; God has given"), because in his times God hearkened to their outcry (Otzar ha-Midrashim, Moshe 4).
Analyzing advertisements for wet-nurses during the US colonial period, Golden notes that Southerners rarely specified the race of the potential wet-nurse; rather, the ads focused on the health and "supply" of the wet-nurse.
Arresting drunks in the town centre has a knock-on effect for the police in having to wet-nurse these people until they are fit to be dealt with, coupled with all the information and evidence required by CPS and the courts.
That the wet-nurse was also thought to have an irredeemable influence on children's personality may be evinced by the fact that some sixteenth and seventeenth century wills left extra money to those children who were breastfed by their mother 'at the expense of those put out to nurse.
Kate Garraway meets a variety of individuals who are open to the idea of cross-feeding - allowing other women to wet-nurse their babies.