whakairo


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whakairo

(fɑːkɑːiːrɒ)
n
(Crafts) NZ the art of carving
[Māori]
References in periodicals archive ?
These oral traditions were transmitted across generations using purakau (storytelling), waiata (song), whakairo (carving), raranga (weaving), moteatea (chants), oriori (lullabies) and pepeha (genealogical narrative) (Lee, 2009; Pihama, Te Nana & Cameron et al, 2015; Smith, 2008; Wirihana, 2012).
ori, as well as providing training in whakairo and raranga, Mr Flavell says.
132-33), and materialized in practices and forms of carving, or whakairo.
Whakairo Tuhonohono Keynote speech, 3rd National Australian Indigenous Education Conference, Ballarat, Victoria.
The family or personal house is not however, in Maori terms, an ultimate state/us symbol since it is at the whare whakairo, the carved meeting house where the ancestral memories are preserved, the whakapapa and stories told, that the novel concludes, leaving the reader to consider the relative significance of each of the character's lives.
The Maori proverb 'He whakatauiki: He toi whakairo, he mana tangata' (where there is artistic excellence, there is human dignity) certainly applies forcefully to both of them.
On the face of it there is little problem with this, but in relation to whakairo (carving), for example, there have been sweeping changes in the way in which it has been articulated in the thousand years since Maori first came to Aotearoa/New Zealand.
315) of whakairo can be read into the `halo', as can a representation of the rays of the sun.
Meeting houses, termed whare nui (large houses) or whare whakairo (carved houses), typically represent the ancestors of iwi (tribes) and local hapu (sub-tribes), and are said to embody their mana.
The applicant had assumed that the whakairo were there to be photographed, that they were inanimate or lacking their own life.