whakapapa


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whakapapa

(ˈhwækəpæpə; ˈfæk-)
n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) NZ genealogy; family tree
[Māori]
References in periodicals archive ?
maki, was revealed during the dawn blessing and recognises the whakapapa of mana whenua.
Redirecting responsibilities for strategic and industrial bargaining and campaign activity on the basis of whakapapa alone, and in isolation to wider resource considerations, will not necessarily deliver equity for Maori members working for iwi and Maori providers.
Originally team selection was 'loosely' governed in terms of heritage, but now all players must have Maori whakapapa or genealogy confirmed in order to represent the side.
This whakapapa continues, to tell the stories of the stars, the children of the heavens, and is common to many Pacific stories, as the basis of traditional astronomical concepts and way-finding, for example on the Hawaiian and Gilbert Islands;
I use the term Moanan (2) to indicate the whakapapa connections the poets have with other poets in the Pacific Islands who have the term 'moana' or 'ocean' in their indigenous languages.
They shall also add to my deep passion for teaching nursing history that contributes to our nursing whakapapa in the "knowledge for nursing practice" course taught to our year-one bachelor of nursing students here at Unitec.
There is a large corpus of tribal specific waiata that are important tribal identity markers and transmit whakapapa (genealogy) and knowledge about important localised historical events.
Such knowledge is passed down within the Maori culture in oratory, and waiata and haka convey history, whakapapa and current day messages to the audience (Smith, 2003).
In the Maori world view, "all things animate and inanimate are linked and all Maori are linked to members of the natural world; all whakapapa descend from one extended family.
Lest critics accuse me of being racially insensitive, I am married into iwi, my children can trace their whakapapa.