whatness

whatness

(ˈwɒtnəs)
n
what something is; the essence of something
References in periodicals archive ?
His topics include whatness and Aristotelian essentialism about a god as secondary substance, a Thomistic perspective on the complexity of a god, a Hegelian view of the essence of a god in appearances, a Sartrean idea of existence preceding essence in a god, and Derridean differential ontology for a god beyond anti-essentialism.
It sustained and composed a model of womanhood in the sphere of domesticity that pushed women to purchase new appliances, compiling a set of essentialist characteristics tied to the way of finding domestic happiness through how-to manuals--building up instructions and tips to domestic, social and family life--and in the end reduced women "to the essential whatness of motherhood.
Heidegger argues that "the division into whatness and thatness does not just contain a doctrine of metaphysical thinking.
In the former question essence is understood initially in the sense of whatness (quidditas) or material content (realitas), whereas truth is understood as a characteristic of knowledge.
However, Aristotle's original phrase does not refer to an adjectival feature of something, its whatness, as the Latin essentia suggests.
The "soul" of the commonest object, "its whatness leaps to us from the vestment of its appearance" (Stephen Hero 216).
His own thesis, which he is alone concerned to prove, runs as follows: From the fact that man has no essence and whatness designed and conceived in advance that could have been invented and then imparted to him by a divine manufacturer, it may be inferred that in the case of man, existence precedes essence.
Perhaps the fictional thing's whatness becomes the fiction's how-ness, or maybe it is vice versa, or these functions are inseparable; hence the serious limits of the old chestnut 'show don't tell'.
The statement of Dietrich effaces not only the distinction in reality between whatness and existence, or strictly speaking, that between man and God, but it highlights, by its line of reasoning, the origin of effectuation of such an effacement.
If he retains anything of this discussion it is the Scholastic sense of 'quidditas, the whatness of a thing"' (Verene, 2003: 18).
By chance, Ellul was born on January 6, the Feast of the Epiphany, a coincidence that would have delighted James Joyce who defined an epiphany as the sudden "revelation of the whatness of a thing," In our time, no man has revealed more of the "whatness" of technology than Ellul, and in Perspectives on Our Age he sums up a lifetime of devotion and thought centered upon the significant quests of our world.
it, on getting a tiny are of whatness in, the circle open,