wheat


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wheat

 (wēt, hwēt)
n.
1. Any of various annual cereal grasses of the genus Triticum of the Mediterranean region and southwest Asia, especially T. aestivum, widely cultivated in temperate regions in many varieties for its commercially important edible grain.
2. The grain of any of these grasses, ground to produce flour used in breads, pasta, and other foods.

[Middle English whete, from Old English hwǣte; see kweit- in Indo-European roots.]

wheat

(wiːt)
n
1. (Plants) any annual or biennial grass of the genus Triticum, native to the Mediterranean region and W Asia but widely cultivated, having erect flower spikes and light brown grains
2. (Cookery) the grain of any of these grasses, used in making flour, pasta, etc
[Old English hwǣte, related to Old Frisian, Old Saxon hwēti, Old High German hweizi, Old Norse hveiti; see white]

wheat

(ʰwit, wit)

n.
1. the grain of any cereal grass of the genus Triticum, esp. T. aestivum, used in the form of flour.
2. the plant itself.
[before 900; Middle English whete, Old English hwǣte, c. Old Saxon hwēti, Old High German weizi, Old Norse hveiti, Gothic hwaiteis; akin to white]
wheat′less, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wheat - annual or biennial grass having erect flower spikes and light brown grains
cereal, cereal grass - grass whose starchy grains are used as food: wheat; rice; rye; oats; maize; buckwheat; millet
genus Triticum, Triticum - annual cereal grasses from Mediterranean area; widely cultivated in temperate regions
wheat berry - a grain of wheat
durum, durum wheat, hard wheat, macaroni wheat, Triticum durum, Triticum turgidum - wheat with hard dark-colored kernels high in gluten and used for bread and pasta; grown especially in southern Russia, North Africa, and northern central North America
soft wheat - wheat with soft starch kernels used in pastry and breakfast cereals
common wheat, Triticum aestivum - widely cultivated in temperate regions in many varieties for its commercially important grain
spelt, Triticum aestivum spelta, Triticum spelta - hardy wheat grown mostly in Europe for livestock feed
emmer, starch wheat, Triticum dicoccum, two-grain spelt - hard red wheat grown especially in Russia and Germany; in United States as stock feed
Triticum dicoccum dicoccoides, wild emmer, wild wheat - found wild in Palestine; held to be prototype of cultivated wheat
2.wheat - grains of common wheat; sometimes cooked whole or cracked as cereal; usually ground into flour
food grain, grain, cereal - foodstuff prepared from the starchy grains of cereal grasses
bulghur, bulgur, bulgur wheat - parched crushed wheat
cracked wheat - grains of wheat that have been crushed into small pieces
wheat germ - embryo of the wheat kernel; removed before milling and eaten as a source of vitamins
common wheat, Triticum aestivum - widely cultivated in temperate regions in many varieties for its commercially important grain
3.wheat - a variable yellow tintwheat - a variable yellow tint; dull yellow, often diluted with white
yellow, yellowness - yellow color or pigment; the chromatic color resembling the hue of sunflowers or ripe lemons
Translations
قَمْحقَمْح، حِنْطَه
pšenice
hvede
vehnä
pšenica
búza
hveiti
小麦
kviečiaikviečiųkvietinis
kvieši
pšenica
vete
ข้าวสาลี
lúa mì

wheat

[wiːt]
A. Ntrigo m
to separate the wheat from the chaffseparar la cizaña or la paja del buen grano
B. CPDde trigo, trigueño
wheat loaf Npan m de trigo

wheat

hwiːt] nblé m, froment m

wheat

nWeizen m; to separate the wheat from the chaff (fig)die Spreu vom Weizen trennen

wheat

[wiːt] ngrano, frumento

wheat

(wiːt) noun
a type of grain from which flour, much used in making bread, cakes etc, is obtained.
ˈwheaten adjective
made of wheat. a wheaten loaf.

wheat

قَمْح pšenice hvede Weizen σιτάρι trigo vehnä blé pšenica grano 小麦 tarwe hvete pszenica trigo пшеница vete ข้าวสาลี buğday lúa mì 小麦

wheat

n. trigo;
___ germgermen de ___.

wheat

n trigo
References in classic literature ?
I hope there will be more wheat and fewer tares every year," said Amy softly.
Sup- pose this--suppose all of the wheat, the corn, the oats, the peas, the potatoes, were all by some mira- cle swept away.
We were talking about what it is like to spend one's childhood in little towns like these, buried in wheat and corn, under stimulating extremes of climate: burning summers when the world lies green and billowy beneath a brilliant sky, when one is fairly stifled in vegetation, in the color and smell of strong weeds and heavy harvests; blustery winters with little snow, when the whole country is stripped bare and gray as sheet-iron.
As the enraptured Ichabod fancied all this, and as he rolled his great green eyes over the fat meadow lands, the rich fields of wheat, of rye, of buckwheat, and Indian corn, and the orchards burdened with ruddy fruit, which surrounded the warm tenement of Van Tassel, his heart yearned after the damsel who was to inherit these domains, and his imagination expanded with the idea, how they might be readily turned into cash, and the money invested in immense tracts of wild land, and shingle palaces in the wilderness.
cried Ahab, aye, Queequeg, the harpoons lie all twisted and wrenched in him; aye, Daggoo, his spout is a big one, like a whole shock of wheat, and white as a pile of our Nantucket wool after the great annual sheep-shearing; aye, Tashtego, and he fan-tails like a split jib in a squall.
And soon the dogs were all tearing down the field of young wheat next to ours.
The million workers in the nation's wheat fields have worked a hundred days each, and the total product of the labor is a billion bushels, so the value of a bushel of wheat is the tenth part of a farm labor-day.
In all lies there is wheat among the chaff; I must get at the wheat in this case: so I sent for the girl and she came.
The principal products raised upon it were tobacco, corn, and wheat.
The plan of a drain, the change of a fence, the felling of a tree, and the destination of every acre for wheat, turnips, or spring corn, was entered into with as much equality of interest by John, as his cooler manners rendered possible; and if his willing brother ever left him any thing to inquire about, his inquiries even approached a tone of eagerness.
Patches of poor rye where com should have been, patches of poor peas and beans, patches of most coarse vegetable substitutes for wheat.
Spenlow solemnly, in conclusion; but when the price of wheat per bushel had been highest, the Commons had been busiest; and a man might lay his hand upon his heart, and say this to the whole world, - 'Touch the Commons, and down comes the country