wheels


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wheel

 (wēl, hwēl)
n.
1. A solid disk or a rigid circular ring connected by spokes to a hub, designed to turn around an axle passed through the center.
2. Something that rotates like a wheel or or has a wheel as its principal part or characteristic, as:
a. The steering device on a vehicle.
b. A potter's wheel.
c. A water wheel.
d. A spinning wheel.
e. Games A device used in roulette and other games of chance.
f. A firework that rotates while burning.
g. Informal A bicycle.
3. A large, roughly circular block of cheese.
4. A wheel-shaped instrument on which victims were bound for torture and execution in medieval and early modern Europe.
5. wheels Forces that provide energy, movement, or direction: the wheels of commerce.
6. The act or process of turning; revolution or rotation.
7. A military maneuver executed in order to change the direction of movement of a formation, as of troops or ships, in which the formation is maintained while the outer unit describes an arc and the inner or center unit remains stationary as a pivot.
8. wheels Slang A motor vehicle or access thereto: Do you have wheels tonight?
9. Slang A person with a great deal of power or influence: a wheel in state government.
v. wheeled, wheel·ing, wheels
v.tr.
1. To roll, move, or transport on wheels or a wheel.
2. To cause to turn around or as if around a central axis; revolve or rotate.
3. To provide with wheels or a wheel.
v.intr.
1. To turn around or as if around a central axis; revolve or rotate.
2. To roll or move on or as if on wheels or a wheel.
3. To fly in a curving or circular course: A flock of gulls wheeled just above the dock.
4. To turn or whirl around in place; pivot: "The boy wheeled and the fried eggs leaped from his tray" (Ivan Gold).
5. To reverse one's opinion or practice: Don't be surprised if the boss wheels about on that idea.
Idioms:
at/behind the wheel
1. Operating the steering mechanism of a vehicle; driving.
2. Directing or controlling; in charge.
wheel and deal Informal
To engage in the advancement of one's own interests, especially in a canny, aggressive, or unscrupulous way.

[Middle English, from Old English hwēol; see kwel- in Indo-European roots.]

wheels

(wiːlz)
pl n
1. the main directing force behind an organization, movement, etc: the wheels of government.
2. (Automotive Engineering) an informal word for car
3. wheels within wheels a series of intricately connected events, plots, etc

wheels

  • gurney - A stretcher with wheels.
  • axel, axle - Axel is the figure-skating jump; axle is the pin or rod between two wheels.
  • dry steering - The act of turning the wheels of a car that is not moving.
  • three-point landing - An aircraft landing in which the two wheels of the main landing gear and the tail or nose wheel touch the ground simultaneously.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
At last he came to a part of the road where the wheels sank half-way into the mire, and the more the horses pulled, the deeper sank the wheels.
One wheel slowly moved, another was set in motion, and a third, and wheels began to revolve faster and faster, levers and cogwheels to work, chimes to play, figures to pop out, and the hands to advance with regular motion as a result of all that activity.
A misshapen-looking peasant covered with dirt, in a cap from which his tangled hair stuck out all round, passed by that window, stooping down to the carriage wheels.
But it differed from human beings in this respect, that instead of hands and feet there grew at the end of its arms and legs round wheels, and by means of these wheels it rolled very swiftly over the level ground.
They were going out for a ride into the hills Sunday morning on their wheels, which did not interest Martin until he learned that Ruth, too, rode a wheel and was going along.
The tumultuous noise resolved itself now into the disorderly mingling of many voices, the gride of many wheels, the creaking of waggons, and the staccato of hoofs.
The wood is alive with them, and full of confused noises: the occasional rattle of wheels as a battery of artillery goes into position to cover the advance; the hum and murmur of the soldiers talking; a sound of innumerable feet in the dry leaves that strew the interspaces among the trees; hoarse commands of officers.
Chanticleer observing that they were but thin fellows, and not likely to take up much room, told them they might ride, but made them promise not to dirty the wheels of the carriage in getting in, nor to tread on Partlet's toes.
Another thing, they scarcely ever put on the brake, however steep the downhill may be, and thus bad accidents sometimes happen; or if they do put it on, they often forget to take it off at the bottom of the hill, and more than once I have had to pull halfway up the next hill, with one of the wheels held by the brake, before my driver chose to think about it; and that is a terrible strain on a horse.
A high chair on wheels moved by, through the field of red light, carrying a shadowy figure with floating hair, and arms furiously raised and lowered working the machinery that propelled the chair at its utmost rate of speed.
If the gentleman's servant would wheel along the paths, he could keep nigh us, and we could lift it over the stiles, and that.
At the bottom of the excavation they constructed a wheel of oak, a kind of circle strongly bolted together, and of immense strength.