whininess

whininess

(ˈwaɪnɪnɪs)
n
the quality of being whiny
References in periodicals archive ?
Avoidance: Perhaps voters see themselves as a people apart, instinctively detached from politicians' bromides and the press's whininess.
Sarah Silverman's character, Cheri Meyerowitz, is the most stereotyped, and "Jewish," of the ensemble, and she goes all outas perhaps only she canto embody middle-child Cheri in all her bratty, obnoxious whininess.
The other guys had been hardened by one awful job after another and did their work without the slightest display of whininess.
Prochnik has an excellent ear for good stories, but a book like this sits perilously close to the unlovely neighborhoods of whininess and precious self-regard.
Parents often report externalizing symptoms, such as irritability, moodiness, whininess, and loss of interest, while adolescents when questioned report internalizing symptoms, such as sadness, suicidal thoughts, and sleep disturbances not apparent to parents (Jeffrey et al.
That both clients are young women seems to dovetail with the protagonist's mix of horniness, loneliness and whininess.
In Vietnam, Nicholas alternated between clingy whininess and a manic whirl of kung-fu punches on the streets.
It may also have had something to do with the grating whininess of Capshaw's nightclub singer, easily the weakest female character in the series.
I always thought that Bush's whininess was just Bush being whiny, but maybe it's a Texas thing.
Which is a very useful question, two simple words, which, depending on their inflection, can express everything from dark-night-of-the-soul delving to adenoidal, self-pitying whininess, either one of which is suitable to the occasion of graduating from college.
From the callousness of the voters to the whininess of the expelled.
I read the whininess and the admonitions as evidence of tango women's rebellion.