whip in


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whip

 (wĭp, hwĭp)
v. whipped also whipt, whip·ping, whips
v.tr.
1. To strike with a strap or rod; lash: whipped the horse with the reins.
2. To afflict, castigate, or reprove severely: "For nonconformity the world whips you with its displeasure" (Ralph Waldo Emerson).
3. To strike or affect in a manner similar to whipping or lashing: Icy winds whipped my face.
4. To arouse or excite, especially with words: whipped the audience into a rage.
5. To beat (cream or eggs, for example) into a froth or foam.
6. Informal To snatch, pull, or remove in a sudden manner: He whipped off his cap.
7. To sew with a loose overcast or overhand stitch.
8. To wrap or bind (a rope, for example) with twine to prevent unraveling or fraying.
9. Nautical To hoist by means of a rope passing through an overhead pulley.
10. Informal To defeat soundly: Our team can whip your team.
v.intr.
1. To move in a sudden, quick manner; dart: whipped out to the airport.
2. To move in a manner similar to a whip; thrash or snap about: Branches whipped against the windows.
n.
1. An instrument, either a flexible rod or a flexible thong or lash attached to a handle, used for driving animals or administering corporal punishment.
2. A whipping or lashing motion or stroke; a whiplash.
3. A blow, wound, or cut made by whipping.
4. Something, such as a long radio antenna on a motor vehicle, that is similar to a whip in form or flexibility.
5. Sports Flexibility, as in the shaft of a golf club: a fishing rod with a lot of whip.
6. Sports A whipper-in.
7.
a. A member of a legislative body, such as the US Congress or the British Parliament, charged by his or her party with enforcing party discipline and ensuring attendance.
b. A call issued to party members in a lawmaking body to ensure attendance at a particular time.
8. A dessert made of sugar and stiffly beaten egg whites or cream, often with fruit or fruit flavoring: prune whip.
9. An arm on a windmill.
10. Nautical A hoist consisting of a single rope passing through an overhead pulley.
11. A ride in an amusement park, consisting of small cars that move in a rapid, whipping motion along an oval track.
Phrasal Verbs:
whip in
To keep together, as members of a political party or hounds in a pack.
whip up
1. To arouse; excite: whipped up the mob; whip up enthusiasm.
2. Informal To prepare quickly: whip up a light lunch.
Idiom:
whip into shape Informal
To bring to a specified state or condition, vigorously and often forcefully.

[Middle English wippen, whippen; see weip- in Indo-European roots.]

whip′per n.

whip in

vb (adverb)
1. (Hunting) (intr) to perform the duties of a whipper-in to a pack of hounds
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (tr) chiefly US to keep (members of a political party, etc) together
References in classic literature ?
When a young gentleman like Dunsey is reduced to so exceptional a mode of locomotion as walking, a whip in his hand is a desirable corrective to a too bewildering dreamy sense of unwontedness in his position; and Dunstan, as he went along through the gathering mist, was always rapping his whip somewhere.
Many of them he could whip in single fight; but single fight was denied him.
Pickwick advancing towards him with the chaise whip in his hand, than he exchanged the rotary motion in which he had previously indulged, for a retrograde movement of so very determined a character, that it at once drew Mr.