References in classic literature ?
At length, however, the mournful notes of a whip-poor-will became blended with the moanings of an owl; his heavy eyes occasionally sought the bright rays of the stars, and he then fancied he saw them through the fallen lids.
Then, as he wended his way by swamp and stream and awful woodland, to the farmhouse where he happened to be quartered, every sound of nature, at that witching hour, fluttered his excited imagination, --the moan of the whip-poor-will from the hillside, the boding cry of the tree toad, that harbinger of storm, the dreary hooting of the screech owl, to the sudden rustling in the thicket of birds frightened from their roost.
I was not only nearer to some of those which commonly frequent the garden and the orchard, but to those smaller and more thrilling songsters of the forest which never, or rarely, serenade a villager -- the wood thrush, the veery, the scarlet tanager, the field sparrow, the whip-poor-will, and many others.
The whip-poor-will was still sending out his lonesome call.
Thus, Whip-poor-will abundance would be predicted to respond positively to landscapes where the required patches are in close proximity (Ries and Sisk 2004).
Kroods ma spends an entire early-May night (20:10-05:04), following one male Whip-poor-will (Caprimulgus vociferus), and counts 20,898 tuck-wHIP-poor-WILLs--2,300 songs/hr and 40 songs/min in just under 9 hr.
Kroodsma spends an entire early-May night (20:10-05:04), following one male Whip-poor-will (Caprimulgus vociferus), and counts 20,898 tuck-WHIP-poor-WILLs--2,300 songs/hr and 40 songs/min in just under 9 hr.
Thus young readers will learn about the songs or sounds of American Robins, White-throated Sparrows, Yellow Warblers, Barred Owls, Black-capped Chickadees, Eastern Whip-poor-wills, Mallards, American Woodcocks, White-breasted Nuthatches, Anna's Hummingbirds, House Sparrows, and Downy Woodpeckers.
Eastern Whip-poor-wills (Antrostomus vociferus) and Common Poorwills (Phalaenoptilus nuttallii) have also been reported to leave eggs unattended at dawn and dusk when adults exchange incubation duties (Cink 2002, Woods et al.
I'm thinking moonshine and cicadas and the scent of mimosa on the evening breeze, and the sound of whip-poor-wills calling across the cooling plains.