whiplash


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Related to whiplash: whiplash injury

whip·lash

 (wĭp′lăsh′, hwĭp′-)
n.
1. The lash of a whip.
2. An injury to the cervical spine caused by an abrupt jerking motion of the head, either backward or forward.

whiplash

(ˈwɪpˌlæʃ)
n
1. (Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) a quick lash or stroke of a whip or like that of a whip
2. (Pathology) med See whiplash injury

whip•lash

(ˈʰwɪpˌlæʃ, ˈwɪp-)

n.
1. the lash of a whip.
2. an abrupt snapping motion resembling the lash of a whip.
3. a neck injury caused by a sudden jerking of the head backward, forward, or both.
[1565–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.whiplash - an injury to the neck (the cervical vertebrae) resulting from rapid acceleration or deceleration (as in an automobile accident)whiplash - an injury to the neck (the cervical vertebrae) resulting from rapid acceleration or deceleration (as in an automobile accident)
harm, hurt, injury, trauma - any physical damage to the body caused by violence or accident or fracture etc.
2.whiplash - a quick blow delivered with a whip or whiplike object; "the whip raised a red welt"
blow - a powerful stroke with the fist or a weapon; "a blow on the head"
Translations
سَيْر مَشْدود في طَرَف السَّوْط
piskesmæld
korbácsolásostorcsapás-sérülésostorszíj
svipuhögg
hyperflexia krkuremienok biča
boyun zedelenmesikamçı

whiplash

[ˈwɪplæʃ] N
1.tralla f, latigazo m
2. (Med) (also whiplash injury) → traumatismo m cervical

whiplash

hwɪplæʃ] n (also whiplash injury) → coup m du lapinwhipped cream ncrème f fouettée

whiplash

[ˈwɪpˌlæʃ] n (blow from whip) → frustata (Med) (also whiplash injury) → colpo di frusta

whip

(wip) noun
1. a long cord or strip of leather attached to a handle, used for punishing people, driving horses etc. He carries a whip but he would never use it on the horse.
2. in parliament, a member chosen by his party to make sure that no one fails to vote on important questions.
verbpast tense, past participle whipped
1. to strike with a whip. He whipped the horse to make it go faster; The criminals were whipped.
2. to beat (eggs etc).
3. to move fast especially with a twisting motion like a whip. Suddenly he whipped round and saw me; He whipped out a revolver and shot her.
ˈwhiplash noun
1. (the action of) the lash or cord of a whip.
2. a neck injury caused by a sudden movement of the head. He escaped the car crash with whiplash and a few bruises.
whipped ˈcream noun
liquid cream that has become thick by whipping it with a whisk. Whipped cream can be taken with ice-cream, coffee and cakes.
whip up
1. to whip. I'm whipping up eggs for the dessert.
2. to produce or prepare quickly. I'll whip up a meal in no time.

whiplash

n latigazo (cervical)
References in classic literature ?
At that word "deception," spoken with such self-contempt, the color flashed back into Hilda's face as suddenly as if she had been struck by a whiplash.
I suppose," said the pedlar, throwing back his whiplash, to bring it down like a feather on the mare's flank, "you have not seen anything of old Mr.
As her beautiful head fell upon her chest I saw the clear red weal of a whiplash across her neck.
Anne would have infinitely preferred a whipping to this punishment under which her sensitive spirit quivered as from a whiplash.
If the rate is left as it is, it will more than cancel out any savings delivered by whiplash reform.
Ciaran Phelan of the Irish Br ais Brokers' Association said: "We absolutely need to tackle the issue of whiplash awards.
Whiplash fraud remains a major concern, Aviva said, with bodily injury frauds such as exaggerated or bogus whiplash claims continuing to account for the majority of fraud Aviva identifies.
A Whiplash injuries occur when the head is jolted beyond its normal range of motion, resulting in damage to the soft tissue (the muscles, ligaments and tendons) of the neck.
The firm revealed whiplash claims alone added PS93 to the average annual premium.
Whiplash claims are 50% higher than they were a decade ago, with the epidemic being fuelled by a predatory claims industry that encourages minor, exaggerated and fraudulent claims, it said.
The Government has welcomed proposals to crack down on false whiplash claims
Premiums are continuing to rise, with an AA insurance expert pointing the finger at the "continuing whiplash epidemic" - as well as the cost to insurers of price comparison sites.