whips


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whip

 (wĭp, hwĭp)
v. whipped also whipt, whip·ping, whips
v.tr.
1. To strike with a strap or rod; lash: whipped the horse with the reins.
2. To afflict, castigate, or reprove severely: "For nonconformity the world whips you with its displeasure" (Ralph Waldo Emerson).
3. To strike or affect in a manner similar to whipping or lashing: Icy winds whipped my face.
4. To arouse or excite, especially with words: whipped the audience into a rage.
5. To beat (cream or eggs, for example) into a froth or foam.
6. Informal To snatch, pull, or remove in a sudden manner: He whipped off his cap.
7. To sew with a loose overcast or overhand stitch.
8. To wrap or bind (a rope, for example) with twine to prevent unraveling or fraying.
9. Nautical To hoist by means of a rope passing through an overhead pulley.
10. Informal To defeat soundly: Our team can whip your team.
v.intr.
1. To move in a sudden, quick manner; dart: whipped out to the airport.
2. To move in a manner similar to a whip; thrash or snap about: Branches whipped against the windows.
n.
1. An instrument, either a flexible rod or a flexible thong or lash attached to a handle, used for driving animals or administering corporal punishment.
2. A whipping or lashing motion or stroke; a whiplash.
3. A blow, wound, or cut made by whipping.
4. Something, such as a long radio antenna on a motor vehicle, that is similar to a whip in form or flexibility.
5. Sports Flexibility, as in the shaft of a golf club: a fishing rod with a lot of whip.
6. Sports A whipper-in.
7.
a. A member of a legislative body, such as the US Congress or the British Parliament, charged by his or her party with enforcing party discipline and ensuring attendance.
b. A call issued to party members in a lawmaking body to ensure attendance at a particular time.
8. A dessert made of sugar and stiffly beaten egg whites or cream, often with fruit or fruit flavoring: prune whip.
9. An arm on a windmill.
10. Nautical A hoist consisting of a single rope passing through an overhead pulley.
11. A ride in an amusement park, consisting of small cars that move in a rapid, whipping motion along an oval track.
Phrasal Verbs:
whip in
To keep together, as members of a political party or hounds in a pack.
whip up
1. To arouse; excite: whipped up the mob; whip up enthusiasm.
2. Informal To prepare quickly: whip up a light lunch.
Idiom:
whip into shape Informal
To bring to a specified state or condition, vigorously and often forcefully.

[Middle English wippen, whippen; see weip- in Indo-European roots.]

whip′per n.

whips

(wɪps)
pl n
(often foll by of) informal Austral a large quantity: I've got whips of cash at the moment.
References in classic literature ?
They knew now that we of the Whips could be killed even as they themselves were killed.
Nicholas standing in a fallow field could see all his whips.
Two young fellows in the cart were just getting whips ready to help Mikolka.
His preference was to remain where he was, but from behind, through the bars of the cage, came shouts and yells, the lash of whips, and the painful thrusts of the long iron forks.
The dragon then flew away, and they journeyed on with their little whip.
The master is fre- quently compelled to sell this class of his slaves, out of deference to the feelings of his white wife; and, cruel as the deed may strike any one to be, for a man to sell his own children to human flesh-mongers, it is often the dictate of humanity for him to do so; for, unless he does this, he must not only whip them himself, but must stand by and see one white son tie up his brother, of but few shades darker com- plexion than himself, and ply the gory lash to his naked back; and if he lisp one word of disapproval, it is set down to his parental partiality, and only makes a bad matter worse, both for himself and the slave whom he would protect and defend.
When a young gentleman like Dunsey is reduced to so exceptional a mode of locomotion as walking, a whip in his hand is a desirable corrective to a too bewildering dreamy sense of unwontedness in his position; and Dunstan, as he went along through the gathering mist, was always rapping his whip somewhere.
my life' and 'my soul,' and his stay and prop- may and ought to whip himself for her and take all the trouble required for her disenchantment.
As nearly as could be expressed, they could be comprised in very few words: to teach them to mind when they were spoken to; to teach them the catechism, sewing, and reading; and to whip them if they told lies.
While this was being done, slowly, amidst mutterings and restlessness on the part of the onlookers, one of the house-boys fetched a heavy-handled, heavy-lashed whip.
Then he stepped through into the moonlit inner campong--the bull whip in his right hand, a revolver in his left.
and putting one foot into it, so as the better to secure his slippery hand-hold on the whip itself, the hoisters ran him high up to the top of the head, almost before Tashtego could have reached its interior bottom.