white asbestos


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Related to white asbestos: chrysotile

white asbestos

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The Cabinet decided to differ the ban on the use of white asbestos for state institutions but will continue the ban on blue asbestos with effect from 1st January 2018, Minister of Health, Nutrition, and Indigenous Medicine and Co-Cabinet Spokesman Dr.
The dangers include trafficking, violence, exploitation of unaccompanied children and the abuse, including rape of women [-] Other sources of danger to human health include toxic white asbestos giving rise to the rise of carcinogenic disease.
The three types are blue, brown and white asbestos, but as it was often mixed with other materials it can be hard to know if you've found it or not.
However, Russia and Kazakhstan (supported until recently by Canada) argue that the mining and processing of white asbestos can be made safe (Ustinov and Karagulova 2013).
DOZENS of workers were switched from their duties in a major safety alert at Birmingham's new PS550 million rail station after a large quantity of white asbestos was uncovered.
A single form of serpentine asbestos, called, chrysotile or white asbestos, is the most commonly used form of asbestos, and accounts for approximately 95% of the asbestos found in buildings throughout the United States.
Signed by former Health Minister Suleiman Franjieh and former Environment Minister Akram Chehayeb, the law bars the importing of Crocidolite, Amosite, Anthophyllite, Actinolite and Tremolite but allows a common asbestos called Crysotile, known as white asbestos.
Heaters in all Merseyrail's trains, some of which are 34-years-old, contain white asbestos.
Gardeners at the allotments in Widdrington Station, Northumberland, were finally given the green light to start cultivating their plots again in March this year following a four-year stay-clear after traces of white asbestos were found in the soil.
White asbestos was not banned from use in the UK until 1999.
However, with its readily accessible deposits of chrysotile, or white asbestos, in Quebec dwindling, Canada's exports have ebbed, according to a report in the journal Lancet .
Andrew Murphy, managing director of Boss Training, said: "Because the use of brown and blue asbestos was only banned in 1985 and white asbestos as late as 1999, there are still many buildings which were built prior to those dates where asbestos can be found.