white horse


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white horse

n
1. (Archaeology) the outline of a horse carved into the side of a chalk hill, usually dating to the Neolithic, Bronze, or Iron Ages, such as that at Uffington, Berkshire
2. (Physical Geography) (usually plural) a wave with a white broken crest
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.white horse - a wave that is blown by the wind so its crest is broken and appears whitewhite horse - a wave that is blown by the wind so its crest is broken and appears white
moving ridge, wave - one of a series of ridges that moves across the surface of a liquid (especially across a large body of water)
Translations
مَوْجَةٌ يُغَطّي الزَّبَدُ قِمَّتها
bølge med skum på toppen
tajtékos hullám
hvítfyssandi alda
spenená vlna
köpüklü dalga

white horse

n (on wave) → cresta di spuma (dell'onda)

white

(wait) adjective
1. of the colour of the paper on which these words are printed. The bride wore a white dress.
2. having light-coloured skin, through being of European etc descent. the first white man to explore Africa.
3. abnormally pale, because of fear, illness etc. He went white with shock.
4. with milk in it. A white coffee, please.
noun
1. the colour of the paper on which these words are printed. White and black are opposites.
2. a white-skinned person. racial trouble between blacks and whites.
3. (also ˈegg-white) the clear fluid in an egg, surrounding the yolk. This recipe tells you to separate the yolks from the whites.
4. (of an eye) the white part surrounding the pupil and iris. The whites of her eyes are bloodshot.
ˈwhiten verb
to make or become white or whiter. She used a little bleach to whiten the sheets.
ˈwhiteness noun
ˈwhitening noun
a substance used to make certain things (eg tennis shoes) white again.
ˈwhitish adjective
fairly white; close to white.
ˌwhite-ˈcollar adjective
(of workers, jobs etc) not manual; (working) in an office etc.
white elephant
a useless, unwanted possession.
white horse noun
(usually in plural) a wave that has a crest of white foam.
ˌwhite-ˈhot adjective
(of metals) so hot that they have turned white. a white-hot poker.
white lie
a not very serious lie. I'd rather tell my mother a white lie than tell her the truth and upset her.
ˈwhitewash noun
a mixture of usually lime and water, used for whitening walls.
verb
to cover with whitewash.
ˈwhitewashed adjective
white winewine
References in classic literature ?
I'm the Poet of White Horse Vale, sir, With liberal notions under my cap.
Long before the time during which we will know him, he was a doctor and drove a jaded white horse from house to house through the streets of Winesburg.
To the unaided eye there is nothing but a black figure on a white horse, tracing slow zigzags against the slope of a distant hill - so slowly they seem almost to creep.
The Great White Horse is famous in the neighbourhood, in the same degree as a prize ox, or a county-paper-chronicled turnip, or unwieldy pig-- for its enormous size.
The foremost, wearing a Cossack cloak and lambskin cap and riding a white horse, was Prince Bagration.
Saturday being a holiday, they were going to have the old white horse, drive to North Riverboro three miles away, eat a twelve o'clock dinner with Emma Jane's cousins, and be back at four o'clock punctually.
I believed blindly at such times that by some miracle, by some external circumstance, all this would suddenly open out, expand; that suddenly a vista of suitable activity--beneficent, good, and, above all, ready made (what sort of activity I had no idea, but the great thing was that it should be all ready for me)--would rise up before me--and I should come out into the light of day, almost riding a white horse and crowned with laurel.
On one of these, an old white horse, the cacique sprung, taking with him his little son.
I saw, as clearly as I now see you, a black shadow riding a white horse that was as like Cesar as two peas
He remembered how he had stood, a small, thrillful boy, prepared to follow the dingy lady upon the white horse, or the band in its faded chariot.
By eleven he was at the foot of White Horse, and that night saw him camped beyond the Box Canon, the last bad river-stretch behind him, the string of lakes before him.
He rode the great white horse which you have seen so often in illustrated papers and Academy pictures; and you may be sure that the salute they gave him was not merely ceremonial.